33 Days Remain to Help Hot New App for Diabetes on MEDSTARTR

33 Days left to help Jennifer assist diabetic patients with her new App.

Donate on MedStartr:  http://beta.medstartr.com/projects/19-endogoddess-diabetes-app-clinical-trial-fundraiser

 MEDSTARTR is the new crowdfunding source for hot Health products. YOU get to donate to the best ones.
    

The EndoGoddess App is terrific for diabetics. It’s created by someone who knows what her patients need.

Today, I’m talking to Jennifer Shine Dyer,MD, MPH, a stylish pediatric endocrinologist and tech entrepreneur with Duet Health Eproximiti.  This former Texan now living in Ohio, loves NYC, fashion, politics, and food is also the founder of EndoGoddess, LLC.

Jennifer is a dynamo who created an App called, The EndoGoddess App to help diabetes patients track their glucoselevels. No more self-entry journaling.  Patients use the App upon checking of glucoses with each meal and bedtime or just once daily to enter all of the glucoses for the day. But she makes it fun. It’s a 21st Century Glucose Journal that rewards you with  free iTunes and a whole lot more.

The EndoGoddess App utilizes a unique social business model for iTunes downloads. The revenue for the iTunes downloads comes from the user’s family and friends who sponsor the user which is a social business model unique to the EndoGoddess App.  That’s right.  Your friends and family reward you when you follow doctor’s orders.

Here’s how it works:  The user enters the sponsor’s email address, and a link to the user’s iTunes account is sent to the sponsor who then submits their desired payment into the user’s account. The feature will be live in coming months.

The main behavior focus of the EndoGoddess App: self-entry glucose. But it also has unique personal, social media, and patient community features. Within the app, users can submit daily diabetes-specific motivational quotes which are screened by Jennifer and then featured on the home page of the app.

The EndoGoddess App also allows the user to customize glucose-check reminder alarms so that adherence triggers are personalized, an additional unique feature. Finally, the EndoGoddess App makes sharing glucose results with doctors and family easy by just touching the share button.

Another cool feature is that information about how to get involved in the diabetes online community (moderated twitter chats, blogs, diabetes camp links, charity links) is provided in addition to original multimedia basic diabetes education content.

Anyone with diabetes who is instructed by their doctor to check their blood sugars 4 times per day can use the EndoGoddess App. It’s also for patients who are checking their blood sugars 4 times per day; typically anyone with insulin-dependent type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Moms who are pregnant, checking their blood sugars frequently due to gestational diabetes can also use the EndoGoddess App.

It provides a more modern form of journal for your glucoses than an old-fashioned paper journal, which also has corresponding carb intake and insulin dosing. The journal has a rewards and points feature.

No more paper journals that look like the one pictured here.

In the next month or so, you will be able to download an iTunes song weekly if your points are high enough. You can keep track of your points on the home page currently upon entering glucoses into the app.

The EndoGoddess App got it’s name from a nickname a patient gave her. ‘Endo’ because she’s an endocrinologist and ‘goddess’ because she likes to wear a little bling everyday.

She was inspired to create the App when she started texting teen patients. She then created a texting app, studied the results in a small pilot study (http://mobihealthnews.com/8599/texting-imrpoves-type-1-diabetes-adherence/) amongst her teen patients which proved that mobile phones make life with diabetes healthier.

Jennifer says, “I then developed The EndoGoddess App to improve upon the initial texting app that I first studied. My patients were the ones that really inspired me to take the plunge into medical technology entrepreneurship full-time so as to get the product in their hands faster.”

Diabetes is hard, and often, patients lose motivation to keep up with it. Diabetes is a unique chronic disease in which the decisions most affecting the health and well-being of patients are made by the patients themselves.

This is the critical reason that the EndoGoddess App targets patient/consumer empowerment primarily rather than just the physician’s efforts to make the largest impact on diabetes-related health outcomes, quality, and costs. In other words, making diabetes easier is a big deal and is the primary focus of the EndoGoddess App.

I asked Jennifer how she thought the EndoGoddess App would change healthcare for the better. She said that in order for doctors to prescribe the EndoGoddess App and for health insurance companies to perhaps even pay people with diabetes to use the app, a clinical trial must prove that apps make people with diabetes healthier.

So Jennifer is pursuing funding in a creative way using new healthcare crowdfunding site, MedStartr. Traditional funding for clinical trials typically comes from federal sources such as NIH which requires that researchers be either part of a university or a non-profit organization. Most funding mechanisms exclude small businesses like startups.

Medstartr allows the public to be involved in funding projects that they think are important and in new technology that they would like to see in healthcare. I think that this mechanism for funding will confirm to investors that the EndoGoddess App is a product that patients want and will hopefully result in new ventures to allow further growth and development of new products.

As the future, Jennifer is super excited to announce that work on the EndoGoddess Kids App started on June 25th through the 10x accelator program, a mentorship-driven investment program designed for energetic and game-changing entrepreneurs. 10x has partnered with Ohio’s New Entrepreneurs (ONE) Fund, an innovative business accelerator designed to attract and retain the best and brightest talent in Ohio.

Teams such as the EndoGoddess Team are awarded $20,000 to bring a project to life over a 10-week period culminating in a pitch day presentation to interested investors within the community.

The EndoGoddess Team will be creating the new EndoGoddess Kids App built for young children with type 1 diabetes and their families. The app will include a new rewards and gaming feature similar in concept to the classic Tamagotchi virtual pet (pictured attached above). The virtual pet, which will need to be ‘fed’ by recording glucoses within the app, is expected to encourage engagement in daily diabetes glucose checking by the child based on appointment dynamic game mechanics theory. It should be available for download at the end of September or early October 2012.


The EndoGoddess Kids App virtual pet will include a reincarnation of her sweet golden retriever, Cooper Dyer, who passed away last year due to cancer (picture with me and Cooper dressed up in our Golden Globes watching attire is attached). So, needless to say, the EndoGoddess Kids App is a labor of love for me.

You’re going to be seeing or hearing about a lot of new Apps in Health, but the problem is the best ones are not necessarily the ones getting funded.

Some get promoted by people who have a vested interest in it or they have a personal relationship with the person, so a lot of crap gets a green light. The person who ends up suffering is the health consumer.  I love products that are actually developed by people who are passionate about helping people and have found a need through their own work and personal experience.  I like to feature people and products or services that end up helping you and deserve funding.  Fortunately, there is now a crowdfunding source for health.  Medstartr.  It allows the community to pick the Best in Class helping it come to market. EndoGodess App is on it. 

So, let’s  help Jennifer Shine Dyer SHINE: People can now donate to the EndoGoddess App here:  http://beta.medstartr.com/projects/19-endogoddess-diabetes-app-clinical-trial-fundraiser

 
 

You can follow Jennifer on the following:

Jennifer’s Blog/website: http://endogoddess.blogspot.com/

Jennifer’s Website: http://www.duethealth.com/

Jennifer on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifershinedyer drjenshinedyer@gmail.com

Jennifer on Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/EndoGoddess

Here is a video of Jennifer explaining the name of EndoGoddess at an international conference in Paris last month:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4GMjwIZPEg

 

 

Diabetes facts

The prevalence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions

WHO predicts that developing countries will bear the brunt of this epidemic in the 21st century. Currently, more than 70% of people with diabetes live in low- and middle income countries.

  • An estimated 285 million people, corresponding to 6.4% of the world’s adult population, will live with diabetes in 2010. The number is expected to grow to 438 million by 2030, corresponding to 7.8% of the adult population.
  • While the global prevalence of diabetes is 6.4%, the prevalence varies from 10.2% in the Western Pacific to 3.8% in the African region. However, the African region is expected to experience the highest increase.
  • 70% of the current cases of diabetes occur in low- and middle income countries. With an estimated 50.8 million people living with diabetes, India has the world’s largest diabetes population, followed by China with 43.2 million.
  • The largest age group currently affected by diabetes is between 40-59 years. By 2030 this “record” is expected to move to the 60-79 age group with some 196 million cases.
  • Diabetes is one of the major causes of premature illness and death worldwide. Non-communicable diseases including diabetes account for 60% of all deaths worldwide.

Lack of sufficient diagnosis and treatment

  • In developing countries, less than half of people with diabetes are diagnosed. Without timely diagnoses and adequate treatment, complications and morbidity from diabetes rise exponentially.
  • Type 2 diabetes can remain undetected for many years and the diagnosis is often made from associated complications or incidentally through an abnormal blood or urine glucose test.
  • Undiagnosed diabetes accounted for 85% of those with diabetes in studies from South Africa, 80% in Cameroon, 70% in Ghana and over 80% in Tanzania.
  • The number of deaths attributable to diabetes in 2010 shows a 5.5% increase over the estimates for the year 2007. This increase is largely due to a 29% increase in the number of deaths due to diabetes in the North America & Caribbean Region, a 12% increase in the South East Asia Region and an 11% increase in the Western Pacific Region.
  • Type 2 diabetes is responsible for 85-95% of all diabetes in high-income countries and may account for an even higher percentage in low- and middle-income countries.
  • 80% of type 2 diabetes is preventable by changing diet, increasing physical activity and improving the living environment. Yet, without effective prevention and control programmes, the incidence of diabetes is likely to continue rising globally.
  • Insulin is vital for the survival of people with type 1 diabetes and often ultimately required by people with type 2 diabetes. Even though insulin’s indispensible nature is recognised by its inclusion in the WHO’s Essential Medicines List, insulin is still not available on an uninterrupted basis in many parts of the developing world.

Diabetes costs – a burden for families and society

  • The financial burden borne by people with diabetes and their families as a result of their disease depends on their economic status and the social insurance policies of their countries. In the poorest countries, people with diabetes and their families bear almost the whole cost of the medical care they can afford.
  • In Latin America, families pay 40-60% of medical care expenditures from their own pockets. In Mozambique, diabetes care for one person requires 75% of the per capita income; in Mali it amounts to 61%; Vietnam is 51% and Zambia 21%.
  • Expressed in International Dollars (ID), which correct for differences in purchasing power, estimated global expenditures on diabetes will be at least ID 418 billion in 2010, and at least ID 561 billion in 2030. An estimated average of ID 878 per person will be spent on diabetes in 2010 globally.
  • Besides excess healthcare expenditure, diabetes also imposes large economic burdens in the form of lost productivity and foregone economic growth. The largest economic burden is the monetary value associated with disability and loss of life as a result of the disease itself and its related complications.
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) predicted net losses in national income from diabetes and cardiovascular disease of ID 557.7 billion in China, ID 303.2 billion in the Russian Federation, ID 336.6 billion in India, ID 49.2 billion in Brazil and ID 2.5 billion in Tanzania (2005 ID), between 2005 and 2015.
  • Unless addressed, the mortality and disease burden from diabetes and other NCDs will continue to increase. WHO projects that globally, deaths caused by these health problems will increase by 17% over the next decade, with the greatest increase in low- and middle-income countries, mainly in the African (27%) and Eastern Mediterranean (25%) regions.

Source: IDF, Diabetes Atlas, 4th edition

 

In 2009, Manny Hernadez published a two-part series on HealthCentral.com reviewed all services that offer online blood glucose tracking tools that he was aware of. He reviewed 7 options. They’re worth a look to see how Glucose Tracking has progressed.
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Again, let’s help Jennifer Shine Dyer SHINE & help diabetic patients by donating to the EndoGoddess App here: http://beta.medstartr.com/projects/19-endogoddess-diabetes-app-clinical-trial-fundraiser 
 
 

Friday Fireside Chat: Dr. Booker, founder, OnPulse

Today, I’m talking to Dr. Corenthian “Corey” Booker.

Corey Booker, not to be confused with the mayor of Newark, is a physician. He received his undergraduate degree in Neurobiology and Physiology at the University of Maryland College, and his medical degree from Creighton University.

Thanks for talking to MedCrunch. What is OnPulse?

OnPulse is a new healthcare product designed to get you, the patient, on the same page as anyone involved in your healthcare. It’s an online environment allowing providers to communicate to one another and their patients. Not only physicians, but staff members –anyone who owns a piece of patient care. With instant online access through the product’s patient profile, connected health teams can view and share relevant information, no matter what EMR they use, or whether they’re at the office, at home or on the road.

Who should use OnPulse?

Any healthcare provider who is currently communicating by email or any specialist trying to manage a large team with email should love OnPulse. Also, any patient who emails their provider should use OnPulse.

How do patients access OnPulse?

It’s web based now (mobile app will be available this summer), so they would log on at http://www.onpulse.com and enter a username and login. Right now, it is by Invitation Only. You can request an invitation at our website. We will release it to more people next month. It can be accessed on iPads and will eventually be available on mobile phones.

What makes OnPulse different from anything else out there?

What makes OnPulse different is we allow the individuals who have an account to own their information. The difference is whenever you stop receiving care somewhere and close an account, you no longer have access to that information. With OnPulse, if you end a relationship with a doctor or provider, you own your information and you can share it with another provider anywhere or anytime you want or the next time you need to access care you can share it with that provider. As a system, multiple providers from different organizations can communicate. It’s based on 4 things: 1. Simplicity. 2. Access. 3. Peace of Mind. 4. On-line teams communicating in one place.

What regulations exist concerning ownership of patient health information?

Multiple state statutes, regulations, and cases govern the ownership of health information and the information contained in medical records. The classic statement of the rule concerning ownership of medical records is that the provider owns the medical records maintained by the provider, subject to the patient’s rights in the information contained in the record.

 
But,under the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), every person “has a right of access to inspect and obtain a copy of protected health information.” The Meaningful Use regulations require that outpatient providers give patients clinical summaries within three business days for at least half of all office visits, if requested. Hospitals have to provide an electronic copy of discharge instructions upon request.

 
The stage two meaningful use places a much greater emphasis on patient engagement and set high standards for making data electronically available to patients. Physicians should think about these requirements as they work to implement a new EHR system. The new rules state that a professional must make electronic records available to 50 percent of their patients. Furthermore, 10 percent of a physician’s patients must actually view and download these records.

Should people be concerned about privacy?


As a patient no one knows you have an OnPulse account unless you tell them. Under HIPPA they allow providers to do what they currently do and allow them to invite other providers to the health team. Everyone on the team knows who has access to information. The system is only transparent to those using it.

When did you develop the idea for OnPulse?
I was exposed to communication in our healthcare system during my first summer of medical school. Writing HEDIS measures for the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), as a Washington Health Policy Fellow intern, taught me that our system was fragmented.

My understanding of communication in healthcare matured in residency when I became responsible for confused patients, busy consultants and returning phone calls to referring doctors for unreceived faxes, but I didn’t do anything about it until my fellowship. As a resident, you learn to communicate with everyone involved, you manage the communication with among your resident colleagues, consultants, patients and the people who are training you. As a resident, you learn to communicate with everyone involved, you manage the communication with among your resident colleagues, consultants, patients and the people who are training you. As a resident I saw, how our means of communication can fail the provider team and the patient. I didn’t know what to do about it at the time.

Within the first six months of my fellowship, I had a patient who looked at me with tears because she had suffered financially, physically and emotionally –she said, ‘I thought you guys were all communicating.’ That was it. I realized that all the faxes, phone calls and emails had failed her and so did our team, despite our best intentions.

Mostly, I learned even more about communicating in healthcare when I became a patient after I ruptured both of my patellar tendons, which connects your knee cap to your lower legs. I realized how difficult it is to navigate healthcare and to have a choice. I also learned how difficult it was for all of the providers to communicate as they are trying to help you reach a certain outcome, especially when they are not in the same organization. For instance I had an orthopedic surgeon and two physical therapist all in different places. This experience really informed how important the asset a patient was to the health team and really improved the system.

How does a patient get started using it?

The patient can either be invited by their provider or they can open their own account. Adding providers is simple. We recommend they that they invite providers that they have an established relationship with, especially an electronic one. If they have multiple providers helping them on a single issue they can suggest to their primary provider to form a health team in OnPulse. Then, you’re able to exchange messages, create a task and share files. Whenever information is requested by you –you receive a text or email alert that something is available to you.

OnPulse spans the communication needs for across sickness, wellness and fitness . For example, some patients even use it to communicate with their fitness trainer, keeping track of a daily routine, and keeping all their health information in one place.

[click  image below to enlarge]

Are there any costs involved for the patient or the provider?

It is free to an individual patients and individual providers. No fee for individual users either patients or doctors. There are subscription payments as a practice to include your business for independent practices or hospitals.

What are the benefits of using OnPulse?

Medical practices can share vital information with other providers and their mutual patients in an easily accessible, unified place. It gives providers and patients secure access to the entire team of healthcare providers. It gives both peace of mind that what they send is actually received by the right person. It helps streamline communication. And it provides personalized communication with everyone. And it’s free to an individual patient and individual provider to use.

Where do you envision OnPulse in 5 years?

My vision for it is to become the healthcare communication environment of choice for all providers and patients. OnPulse, the new on-line healthcare communication environment for patients and providers.

How did medicine and entrepreneurship meet?

My background is medicine with a consistent thread of entrepreneurship. During my fellowship I completed the masters program in clinical informatics at the Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business to better understand how to apply my ideas to clinical medicine. Prior to this time I dabbled in buying and selling houses, creating an online stationary company for my creative wife Kathy and forming a mobile application development company, but by far (besides my kids) OnPulse is the thing that wakes me up and takes me to bed.

“I believe in better communication in healthcare. That’s why I developed OnPulse, where everyone can easily contribute to the personalized best care for the patient and the patient will own 100 percent of their records, and be able to share them accordingly with their health team of choice.” ~ Corey Booker, MD/founder, OnPulse

[click image above to enlarge]

For More Information visit http://www.onpulse.com

 

If you have any questions for Dr. Booker, feel free to ask them below.

Kaiser Leads Mobile Healthcare

Nearly 9 Million Kaiser Permanente Health Records Securely Available on Mobile Devices

Kaiser Permanente already has the largest electronic medical record system in the world.

The Pew Internet Project reported that 40 percent of American adults access the Internet via their mobile phones, and in some cases, mobile phones are their primary source of Internet access.

Twenty-five percent of smart-phone owners go online primarily using their phone; of these, roughly one-third have no high-speed home broadband connection.

Three months ago, the health care organization announced that 9 million Kaiser Permanente patients now can easily access their own medical information anywhere in the world on mobile devices through a mobile-optimized website.

An additional app for iPhone will be released in the coming months.  Meantime, iPhone users can download a shortcut icon to kp.org

In 2011 alone, more than 68 million lab test results were made available online to Kaiser Permanente patients.

Kaiser Permanente patients will have 24/7 access to lab results, diagnostic information…

direct and secure email access to their doctors, and will also be able to order prescription refills.

Kaiser Permanente had more than 12 million e-visits in 2011 alone, and they expect that number to rise.

The Android app is available now in the Android Market at no charge.

Users of other mobile devices can access the same set of care-support tools at no charge through the new secure, mobile-optimized member website, which is available through smart-phone Internet browsers.

Kaiser Permanente patients or family members who can act on their behalf, now have 24/7 access from their mobile devices to view their secure personal health record, email their doctors, schedule appointments, refill prescriptions and locate Kaiser medical facilities on kp.org

“This is the future of health care. Health care needs to be connected to be all that it can be. This new level of connectivity is happening real time, and it is happening on a larger scale than anything like it in the world,” said George Halvorson, chairman and chief executive officer of Kaiser Permanente.

“The fact that a Kaiser Permanente patient in an emergency room in Paris or Tokyo can simply pull out their mobile device and have immediate and current access to their own medical information is an evolutionary and revolutionary breakthrough for medical connectivity.”

“Our members love our current connectivity tools,” said Christine Paige, senior vice president of marketing and Internet services.

“Now we will extend our entire connectivity tool kit for patients through a mobile phone. Our mobile-optimized site and app take connectivity to the next level by making the mobile experience easy and enjoyable. We believe that convenience, paired with a great user experience, will meet members’ needs and will ultimately result in improved health and patient-physician relationships.”

iPHONE SHORTCUT ICON

  • Go to kp.org on your iPhone mobile Web browser
  • Click on the middle icon at the bottom of your screen
  • Choose “Add to Home Screen
  • A short cut will be added to your iPhone icons

Members using the Android app have access to their kp.org accounts by touching the app icon on their phones.

Those visiting kp.org from a mobile phone Internet browser are seamlessly redirected to the mobile-optimized website, which was designed for optimal viewing on a mobile-phone screen.

In both cases, a streamlined menu of mobile-optimized features helps members find what they need quickly and easily with minimal taps.

“Providing our patients with clear and convenient access to their health information is a step forward in connectivity and improving the health care experience for patients, no matter where they are,” saidJack Cochran, MD, executive director of The Permanente Federation.

“We already have complete connectivity among Kaiser Permanente care sites through Kaiser Permanente HealthConnect®. This new level of connectivity extends the reach of information to our patients in a more convenient and user-friendly format. This new app and mobile-optimized site is very good for patient care and will revolutionize connectivity by bringing health care for the first time to the level of connectivity other parts of our economy have achieved.”

Users’ personal health information is safe and secure while using the new app and the mobile-friendly kp.org, which employ the same security safeguards that protect patient information on the traditional kp.org website, including secure sign-on and automatic sign-out after a period of inactivity.

“The benefits of mobile extend beyond member engagement,” said Philip Fasano, executive vice president and chief information officer of Kaiser Permanente.

“Mobile solutions can have a positive impact on health. Health care, itself, will be much more convenient for many people. The mobile-friendly site and app are also a springboard for new innovations that will inspire members to be aware of their health and take steps to improve it.”

“There has been an explosion in the growth of mobile devices and users are looking for new and improved ways to manage their lives online,” Halvorson said.

“It is time to make health information easily accessible from mobile devices.”

This is a major new connectivity offering, but it is not Kaiser Permanente’s first mobile app. Other, more targeted tools, were released earlier. Kaiser Permanente launched its first mobile application, KP Locator for iPhone, in July 2011.

The facility-finder app has been downloaded 42,000 times.

KP Locator combines the power of kp.org’s robust facility directory and the iPhone’s GPS capabilities to make searching for Kaiser Permanente facilities fast and easy for patients on the go.

It answers three of the most basic, but vital, user questions thoroughly and simply — where are the Kaiser Permanente locations close to me, how can I contact and get to them, and what departments and services can I access there? Kaiser Permanente also released its Every Body Walk! app two months ago to help encourage people to walk and maintain healthy activity levels, and that app was rated No. 5 in the Top 100 Green Apps by Eco-Libris.

Kaiser Permanente is known for its leadership in the use of health information technology. The Kaiser Permanente electronic health record is the largest non-governmental medical record system in the world. KP HealthConnect enables all of Kaiser Permanente’s nearly 16,000 physicians to electronically access the medical records of all 8.9 million Kaiser Permanente members nationwide and serves as a model for other care systems.

Kaiser Permanente has received numerous awards for its health IT expertise, including four 2011 eHealthcare Leadership Awards.

You can learn more about how patients, clinicians and researchers are using My Health Manager and KP HealthConnect by checking out Kaiser Permanente’s YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/kaiserpermanenteorg. Kaiser Permanente also has what might be the world’s most complete electronic medical library to support its caregivers by providing convenient access to the best and most current medical science. That electronic medical library is for internal use only.

Nearly 9 Million Kaiser Permanente Health Records Securely Available on Mobile Devices

Kaiser Sunset Hospital in Los Angeles, CA

Kaiser Sunset Hospital in Los Angeles, CA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)