7 Ways To Prevent Melanoma This Summer by Maria Dorfner

summerondock Remember, even though you look better tanned, it’s the opposite of healthy skin.  Here’s how to protect your skin:

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1.  AVOID TANNING BOOTHS

Obvious, but teens & adults still frequent tanning booths.  They can be just as dangerous as arsenic, asbetos and cigarettes.

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2.  AVOID THE SUN BETWEEN 10 A.M. AND 4 P.M.

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3.  USE SUNSCREEN

The SPF should be at least 15. Reapply every 2 hours to ALL exposed areas of skin. Reapply MORE often if you swim or sweat.

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4. WEAR A HAT

A wide brim hat is better than a baseball cap.  If you drive a convertible, protect yourself.

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5.  COVER UP

Dark covered clothes reflect UV rays best.  Cover your arms and legs in tightly woven clothes.

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6.  BE CAUTIOUS ON CLOUDY DAYS AS SUN’S UV RAYS PENETRATE CLOUDS

The sun’s UV rays on a cloudy day can even affect your skin under a beach umbrella. Use all the tips here, sun or clouds.

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7.  SEE YOUR DERMATOLOGIST TO GET ANY EXISTING MOLES CHECKED

Make sure those cute freckles are just that.  Get a clean skin bill of health at the start of summer. Then, protect yourself.  If you need a recommendation to a good one, contact us.  Be sure to protect little kids and babies too!

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Melanoma is the deadliest type of skin cancer.  It develops in the cells of your skin that produce melanin, the pigment that gives your skin its color.  Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from tanning beds or the sun increases your risk. When untreated, the melanoma can travel throughout the body, attack organs and be fatal.  That’s NOT hot.

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You are at even greater risk if you have a history of sunbruns, many moles, a family history of melanoma, are blond, red headed, fair skinned, light eyed, although people with dark skin are not immune.

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If found early, melanoma is curable.  Check your skin and your partner’s skin regularly. 

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Remember the A, B, C, D of suspicious, potentially cancerous moles:

ASYMMETRICAL – Two halves of the mole do not match

BORDERS – The edges of the mole are not even or smooth

COLOR – The mole has multiple shades or colors

DIAMETER – Cancerous moles are larger than an eraser on a pencil

EVOLVING – The mole is changing shape, color, growing, itching or bleeding

If you find a suspicious one take a photo. Then, take another photo 2 months later, and see if it’s changed. If so, see a Dermatologist immediately.

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PROTECT YOURSELF SO YOU CAN HAVE FUN IN THE SUN.  

Related articles

MedCrunch is a division of Healthy Within Network (HWN) founded by Maria Dorfner.  Health tips? Health stories? 
Contact: maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

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STAY HEALTHY, EVERYONE! :-)

8 Things Your Hair Says About Your Health

Experts say the health of our hair and scalp can be a major tip-off to a wide variety of health conditions.  Here, eight red flags that tell you it’s time to pay more attention to the health of your hair –and your overall health.

Red flag #1: Dry, limp, thin-feeling hair

What it means: Many factors can lead to over-dry hair, including hair dyes, hair blowers, and swimming in chlorinated water. But a significant change in texture that leaves hair feeling finer, with less body, can be an indicator of an underactive thyroid, known as hypothyroidism.   Other signs of hypothyroidism: fatigue, weight gain, slow heart rate, and feeling cold all the time.  A telltale sign: when the outermost third of the eyebrow thins or disappears.

 
Red flag #2: Scaly or crusty patches on the scalp, often starting at the hairline

What it means: When a thick crust forms on the scalp, this usually indicates psoriasis, which can be distinguished from other dandruff-like skin conditions by the presence of a thickening, scab-like surface, says Lawrence Greene, MD, a spokesperson for the National Psoriasis Foundation.  It often occurs in concert with other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Up to 30 percent of people with psoriasis develop a condition called psoriatic arthritis, which causes painful swelling of the joints.

Red flag #3: Thinning hair over the whole head

What it means: When you notice considerably more hairs in your brush after you shampoo — or when hair appears to be coming out in clumps – it’s time for concern. One common cause: a sudden psychological or physical stressor, such as a divorce or job loss. Another: having a high fever from the flu or an infection. Diabetes and a number of medications also cause hair loss as a side effect. For more information and a list of which meds cause hair loss and what to do about it see  link below.

Red flag #4: Overall hair loss that appears permanent, often following traditional pattern baldness

What it means: Both women and men are subject to what’s formally known as androgenetic and androgenic alopecia. It’s usually caused by a change in the pattern of the sex hormones, but diseases and other underlying conditions can cause this type of hair loss by affecting the hormones. In women, a derivative of testosterone is often the culprit, shrinking and eventually killing off hair follicles. Traditionally known as “male pattern baldness,” this type of hair loss is often hereditary and is typically permanent if not treated with medication, says Larry Shapiro, a dermatologist and hair surgeon in Palm Beach, Florida.  Diabetes also can cause or contribute to hair loss. Over time, diabetes often leads to circulatory problems; as a result, the hair follicles don’t get adequate nutrients and can’t produce new hairs. Hair follicles can eventually die from lack of nutrition, causing permanent hair loss.

Red flag #5: Dry, brittle hair that breaks off easily

What it means: When individual hairs litter your pillow in the morning, this typically indicates breakage rather than hair falling out from the follicle, says Chicago dermatologist Victoria Barbosa. Breakage is most frequently the result of hair becoming over-brittle from chemical processing or dyeing. “Bleaching, straightening, and other chemical processing techniques strip the cuticle to let the chemicals in, which makes the hair shaft more fragile,” Barbosa explains.  However, certain health conditions also lead to brittle, fragile hair.  Click on the link below to find out which ones.

Red Flag #6: Hair falling out in small, circular patches

What it means: The body’s immune response turns on the hair follicles themselves, shrinking them and causing hair to fall out entirely in small, typically round patches. This kind of hair loss — which experts call alopecia areata — can also occur at the temples or at the part line. Diabetes can trigger the onset of such hair loss in some people. And it can continue to spread; in extreme cases, sufferers lose all their hair or lose hair over their entire body.  Alopecia areata can also cause the eyebrows or eyelashes to fall out, which in addition to the circular pattern can distinguish it from other types of hair loss. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition and has been shown to be more common in families with a tendency toward other autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, early-onset diabetes, and thyroid disease.

Red flag #7: Yellowish flakes on the hair and scaly, itchy patches on the scalp

What it means: What most of us grew up calling dandruff is now understood to be a complicated interaction of health issues that deserve to be taken seriously. Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the scalp that causes skin to develop scaly patches, often in the areas where the scalp is oiliest. When the flaky skin loosens, it leaves the telltale “dandruff” flakes.

Red flag #8: Gray hair

What it means: While they can’t yet prove or explain it, many researchers now believe that stress may trigger a chain reaction that interferes with how well the hair follicle transmits melanin, the pigment that colors hair. Researchers are looking at the role of free radicals, which are hormones we produce when under stress, and studies seem to show that they can block the signal that tells the hair follicle to absorb the melanin pigment.  Other experts argue that a trauma or stressful event causes the hair to stop growing temporarily and go into a resting phase. Then when the hair follicles “wake up” and begin turning over again, a lot of new hair grows in all at once, making it appear that a great deal of gray has come in all at the same time.

FOR MORE INFORMATION and WHAT TO DO if you have any of the above, be sure to read the entire article here: http://www.caring.com/articles/eight-things-hair-says-about-health

                                                                                                                                          

This content was originally published by Caring.com: “8Things Your Hair Says About Your Health” and this excerpt reprinted here with permission.

Stay healthy! :-)

Mayo Clinic Study: Dramatic Skin Cancer Rise 18-39

Health officials are specifically citing tanning salons as a major source of the increase, the April issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings suggests.

Researchers examined records from a decades-long database of all patient care in Olmsted County, Minn., and looked for first-time diagnoses of melanoma in patients ages 18-39 from 1970 to 2009, writes Janice Lloyd for USA Today. Melanoma cases increased eightfold among women in that time and fourfold for men, the authors say.

Report co-author Jerry Brewer, a dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic told Lloyd: “We need to get away from the idea that skin cancer is an older person’s disease.”

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/18GtB)

Know What to Look for: the ABCDE’s of Skin Cancer:

A — asymmetry: one side of a mole or dark spot looks different from the other side

B — border: instead of being circular or oval, the mole has a jagged edge

C — color: the mole has more than one color, a dark area, a light area or the colors red, white or blue within it

D — diameter: the mole is larger than 6 mm across, roughly the size of a pencil eraser

E — evolution: any other changes are noted in the mole, even if the change can’t be categorized by A, B, C or D, above. Any itching or bleeding in a mole is also important

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/04/02/study-finds-dramatic-rise-in-skin-cancer-among-young-adults/?xid=rss-topstories#ixzz1quSbONne

                                Suzanne in San Diego Shares Her Story:

This is what skin cancer looks like

 
 
Can you find it? Yeah, thought so. The above circle is a Basal Cell Carcinoma. It is skin cancer. Fortunately, I became sun smart around 5 years ago. I knew well of my fun yet reckless relationship with the sun and what it could possibly bring to me one day.
 
Years of living near the beach as a child with the pre-sun aware generation, sun drenched sunscreen-free days as a teenager swimming at the beach and practicing tennis August, September and October (some of the hottest months in San Diego) without protection came back to kick me in the ass early in life. I can’t even count how many times I was burned.
 
I know I have been sun poisoned on several occasions. Oh and the kicker… I started tanning in what I will refer as the skin cancer chamber, AKA: the tanning bed. Boy did I feel so beautiful with a golden glow! It looked SO healthy! I would parade around in my favorite fashions (and God knows I LOVE to wear clothes) and not feel like Casper.
 
Then I wised up. I grew up. My Husband was freaked out a bit I was starting to turn darker than him. He is part Mexican and naturally tan. I did not want to look like a catcher’s mitt when I grew older.
 
My history made me more aware of my skin. I would stare at any sign of an asymmetrical mole. More stories about being sun smart were found and heard on TV and in magazines other than the Reader Digest crowd. I started to wear sunscreen on my face every day and stayed in the shade while outdoors. I tried, but not hard enough. They say the damage has been done early in life.
 
It started out as a tiny pearly bump on my upper forehead (seen on the above picture while in Hawaii). I could barely point it out to people. It stayed and slowly became a bit bigger, but barely.
 
The skin cancer flags went off in my head when one morning I noticed it was scaling over and bleeding. It was indented in the middle. I soon made an appointment to see my primary care doctor who referred me to see a dermatologist. She thought nothing of it, but I knew better.
 
Several months later I finally came around to seeing the dermatologist. I had to point out the tiny lesion. There guess was it was an Actinic Keratosis (pre-skin cancer). They chose to try and freeze it off (cryosurgery) twice within a year. The lesion stayed. It actually got smaller.
 
I was supposed to go in every 6 months, but several more passed. The “lesion” was barely noticeable. I had microdermabrasion done and I was SO pleased with the results. I had my 3rd dermatology appointment a week later.
 
The dermatologist came in and automatically looked concerned the lesion was still noticeable. They looked again under their special light and ordered a biopsy right away. I was sick. They had said no lesion would be there unless there was cancer brewing under my skin. It could be like the tip of a glacier with all the skin cancer under my forehead. Within the next hour they numbed up my forehead twice and took a tiny cookie cutter of skin off my forehead. I was on my way home until further notice.
 
I did not hear anything for 7 days and was so excited. No news is good news, right? WRONG. I came in to get my forehead stitches out and found my doctor was at a conference. I left excited to have my forehead back and a promise to wear lot’s of sunscreen for the rest of my life along with the senior citizen style hats while in the direct sun.
 
I came home. Eric Skyped me and I received a call at the same time. I answered when I noticed it was from the US Government and when I put two and two together I realized it may be the Naval Hospital. It was my doctor. He mentioned he was sorry he missed me and wanted to tell me in person, but I did in fact have Basal Cell Carcinoma.
 
He wanted to start Aldara immediately. Aldara puts your immune system into hyper drive to try and kill off the cancer cells. It is considered a topical chemo. He told me how it worked and I gasped a bit through nervous laughter. He thought it was the best non-invasive way to try and get rid of the cancer. I was ready to get it over with and start ASAP.
 
I cancelled fun plans and started sun free days right away. I told Eric and cried. One more thing to worry about. I tried to reassure myself what I had was the best type of cancer to have! BCC is rare to metastasize and grows slowly! Yippee!
 
The next five weeks sucked. I threw up out of nowhere the first week on the medication and had muscle and stomach aches. I had hot flashes throughout the day. It scared me that this small amount of cream was so poisonous. I read about the awful side effects online and decided that was a bad idea to research and forced myself to stop googling.
 
The last 3 weeks have been full of spine and lower back pain mixed with a massive amount of fatigue. The lesion grew everyday and got uglier. I had to use ALL of the cream. It scabbed over, would crack, then pus from the middle and drain out to the rest of my forehead.
 
I would put the cream on at night and wash it off in the morning as it ripped off my skin and would slightly bleed. I am nearing the end. My doc gave me the OK to cut my cream application in half and stop this week. I am already feeling better other than the part where I want to SCRATCH MY FOREHEAD OFF!!!!
 
I am not out of the running for Moh’s Surgery that will leave a big scar on my forehead. We will see how the lesion heals and if the cancer is still there with another biopsy. It can come back. It may have never gone away. I have increased my chances for Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Melanoma. My chance of getting more of these on my face is increased greatly.
 
Being tan is NOT worth it. If anything, be vain and think of all the photo aging the sun does.
 
I LOVE the outdoors more than your typical person, but now I choose to do it safely. I have invested in SPF clothing some amazing hats and great sunscreen applied properly on my face and exposed body. I bought a super cute parasol. I have large SPF 50 sun tents now for outdoor activities.
 
I have embraced my HEALTHY skin. Eric loves me pale and I am embracing it and rocking it!
 
Hoping this six weeks will be the last with my battle of the lesion!
 
The first week.
 
My Husband took a few days leave to support me during a crazy schedule! LOVE this man!
 
Week Three…that is ALL cancer being attacked.
 
Week Four…starting to really hurt :-(
 
Thankfully I can rock the you know what out of a hat and have tons of cute ones now! Another reason to shop!
 
At my worst. Week 5
 
Week five and over it! My face was so tender and swollen here.
 
Hoping it does not leave too bad of a scar. Thankful for laser treatment!
 

SHINE ON: Foods for Healthy, Glowing Skin

Well, I got messages from my last blog saying my face isn’t shiny…it’s GLOWING.  Ha!  Turns out, some health experts agree. 

While Negative Nancys point out how celebs like Gwenyth are too shiny, other articles tell you HOW to get SHINY skin.  I prefer to error on the side of GOOD HEALTH, so shine on! 

Here’s how to nourish your skin from the inside/out:

Foods that make Skin Beautiful & Shiny

Everyone wants to have a beautiful and shiny skin.  A healthy lifestyle i.e. daily exercise, adequate sleep as well as nutritionally-balanced diet helps to get a beautiful skin and improve overall health. Consume a healthy and well-balanced diet that rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, whole grains to ensure your skin gets all the nutrients it requires.

Foods that make Skin Beautiful & Shiny

Make Skin Beautiful & Shiny by eating below foods:

Walnuts

For a healthy skin, the best-known essential fatty acids i.e. omega 3 and omega 6 must be in balance. Walnuts are an excellent source of Omega-3 fatty acids, which help to make skin smoother and younger looking. Walnuts also provide other health benefits, for example put shine in hair, increase vision properties, and help to build strong bones. To enjoy their benefits, you don’t need to consume cupfuls of walnuts. Just consume handful of walnuts or throw some in your pasta, salad, or dessert.

Green Vegetables

Dark green vegetables are great source of nutrients and antioxidants. They contain potassium, vitamin C, vitamin A, β-carotene, iron, vitamin B6, omega-3 fatty acids and folic acid in good amount. Vitamin A helps in the formation of new cells; thus it keeps the skin, eyes and hair beautiful, shiny and bright. The good content of iron contained in these vegetables can recover iron-deficiency anemia, and make the skin shiny and ruddy.

Garlic

Only a small clove of garlic offers so many health benefits. Garlic has natural blood thinner properties so it improves blood circulation. Also, it is a good source of anti-oxidants which destroy free radicals and prevent premature aging. People having oily and acne prone skin can also get benefit from garlic due to anti-septic properties of it. In many ways garlic can be used to battle beauty problems; however regular intake of fresh garlic can help to prevent the topical use of garlic. Consume a clove of minced or chopped garlic every day to get all the beneficial properties.

Green Tea

In the list of skin-friendly beverages, green tea is on top as it is a storehouse of polyphenols. Green tea is one of the best foods for healthy skin as it protects cells and helps to prevent skin cancer and other skin-related disorders. Whether you take it orally or applied on the skin directly, the anti-inflammatory properties of green tea would surely give you glowing skin. Green tea can decrease the risk of damage from ultraviolet light (the burning rays of the sun), and thus decrease the risk of skin cancer. All these properties of green tea are beneficial to skin health overall.

Ginger

Fresh ginger roots contain volatile oils, phenol compounds which are utilized to treat inflammatory conditions, digestive disorders and many other ailments. For beautiful skin, circulation of blood is very important as when circulation is increased, puffiness is decreased and the blood is better capable to provide skin cells with nutrients/take waste away. Ginger increases blood flow, stimulates skin, and will provide a warming effect when utilized to cleanse skin.

Dark Chocolate

Many people have misconceptions that chocolate is responsible for acne but they are not aware about the fact that chocolate is actually helpful to get beautiful skin. Consumption of dark chocolate keeps the skin hydrated for longtime and protects it from sun damage, which is almost contrary to acne belief. Before you include dark chocolate in your diet, remember that the best type of chocolate has at least 60 percent cacao and high flavanol content.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are the richest source of lycopene, the anti-aging antioxidant. Lycopene present in tomatoes is more easily absorbed by body when it is taken in cooked or processed form. So, ensure to take tomato juice, canned tomato sauce, and ketchup. Besides being an excellent source of the antioxidant lycopene, tomatoes are also regarded as a high-carotenoid fruit. One study has found that lycopene-rich tomato paste helps to prevent sunburn when it is combined with olive oil and applied on skin daily for ten weeks.

Avocados

Avocado is a high-fat fruit which contains vitamins A, D, and E in good amount. Also, it is an excellent source of biotin, vitamin H. Due to all these nutrients, avocado offers a natural way to keep skin moisturized. Also, it helps to soften the skin and prevent brittle hair and nails. It also works well topically. Peel the fruit and mash an avocado; apply the mashed flesh on your skin. Let it on skin for 15 minutes and then rinse it off with a cool washcloth. If you are prone to acne, don’t use it on your skin too frequently.

Nutritionist, Lisa Drayer, MA, says the Top 10 Foods for gorgeous skin and hair are:

1.   Blueberries

2.  Wild Salmon

3.  Spinach

4.  Oysters

5.  Tomatoes

6.  Walnuts

7.   Kiwis

8.  Dark Chocolate

9.  Yogurt

10.  Sweet Potatoes

Fortunately, those are all favorites of mine and you can add my favorite snack to the list as a bonus.  Almonds are a super food for super skin.  Love it.

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An Overview of Your Skin from The Cleveland Clinic:

The basics

Skin is the largest organ on our body, made up of several different components, including water, protein, lipids and different minerals and chemicals. It takes a lot to protect you, too: just about six pounds (that’s roughly how much your skin would weigh by itself). Throughout your life your skin will change, for better or worse. In fact, your skin will regenerate itself approximately every 27 days. Proper care and treatment is essential to maintaining the health and vitality of this crucial protection.

What your skin demands daily

It’s easy to skip that glass of water during the haste of your daily routines or to cleanse yourself. But over time, those bad habits can take a toll on your skin. Each day you should make certain to provide your skin with

  • Plenty of water.
  • Thorough cleansing – You should perform this twice daily. At night, make sure you remove all your make-up and cleanse properly before going to bed.
  • Balanced nutrition.
  • Toning – that is, after you cleanse with your bar soap or other cleanser, make sure you use a formulated toner or astringent to remove fine traces of oil, dirt, and make-up that you may have missed when cleansing.
  • Moisturizing - this is a necessary step even for those who have oily skin. There are plenty of moisturizers on the market that are oil-free.

Over the course of your life, you should pay attention to all parts of your skin. Familiarize yourself with it, so you’ll notice any changes that might occur, such as different moles or patches that might require further attention.

This information serves as an overview only, and should not replace a professional’s advice.

The skin’s structure

Epidermis: The outer layer

It’s the thinnest layer, but it’s responsible for protecting you from the harsh environment, with five layers of its own: stratum germinativum, stratum spinosum, stratum granulosum, stratum lucidum, and stratum corneum. The epidermis also hosts different types of cells: keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. Keratinocytes produce the protein known as keratin, the main component of the epidermis. Melanocytes produce your skin pigment, known as melanin. Langerhans cells prevent things from getting into your skin!

Dermis: The middle layer

This is the layer responsible for wrinkles. The dermis is a complex combination of blood vessels, hair follicles, and sebaceous (oil) glands. Here, you’ll find collagen and elastin, two proteins necessary for skin health because they offer support and elasticity. Fibroblasts are the cells you’ll find in this layer, because they synthesize collagen and elastin. This layer also contains pain and touch receptors.

Hypodermis: The fatty layer

Reduction of tissue in this layer is what contributes to sagging skin. This layer is also known as the subcutis. It hosts sweat glands, and fat and collagen cells, and is responsible for conserving your body’s heat and protecting your vital inner organs.

The skin’s proteins

Collagen:

It’s the most abundant protein in the skin, making up 75 percent of your skin. This is also your fountain of youth, for it’s responsible for warding off wrinkles and fine lines. Over time, environmental factors and aging diminish your body’s ability to produce collagen.

Elastin:

Think elastic. This protein is found with collagen in the dermis.

It’s another protein, responsible for giving structure to your skin and organs. As with collagen, elastin is affected by time and the elements. Diminished levels of this protein cause your skin to wrinkle and sag.

Keratin:

This dominant protein in your skin makes up hair, nails and the surface layer of the skin. Keratin is what forms the rigidity of your skin.

Can’t find the health information you’re looking for?

This information is provided by the Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________

More Skin care Tips from THE MAYO CLINIC:

Good skin care — including sun protection and gentle cleansing — can keep your skin healthy and glowing for years to come.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Don’t have time for intensive skin care? Pamper yourself with the basics. Good skin care and healthy lifestyle choices can help delay the natural aging process and prevent various skin problems. Get started with these five no-nonsense tips.

1. Protect yourself from the sun

One of the most important ways to take care of your skin is to protect it from the sun. A lifetime of sun exposure can cause wrinkles, age spots and other skin problems — as well as increase the risk of skin cancer.

For the most complete sun protection:

  • Use sunscreen. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. When you’re outdoors, reapply sunscreen every two hours — or more often if you’re swimming or perspiring.
  • Seek shade. Avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun’s rays are strongest.
  • Wear protective clothing. Cover your skin with tightly woven long-sleeved shirts, long pants and wide-brimmed hats. Also consider laundry additives, which give clothing an additional layer of ultraviolet protection for a certain number of washings, or special sun-protective clothing — which is specifically designed to block ultraviolet rays.

2. Don’t smoke

Smoking makes your skin look older and contributes to wrinkles. Smoking narrows the tiny blood vessels in the outermost layers of skin, which decreases blood flow. This depletes the skin of oxygen and nutrients that are important to skin health. Smoking also damages collagen and elastin — the fibers that give your skin its strength and elasticity. In addition, the repetitive facial expressions you make when smoking — such as pursing your lips when inhaling and squinting your eyes to keep out smoke — can contribute to wrinkles.

If you smoke, the best way to protect your skin is to quit. Ask your doctor for tips or treatments to help you stop smoking.

3. Treat your skin gently

Daily cleansing and shaving can take a toll on your skin. To keep it gentle:

  • Limit bath time. Hot water and long showers or baths remove oils from your skin. Limit your bath or shower time, and use warm — rather than hot — water.
  • Avoid strong soaps. Strong soaps and detergents can strip oil from your skin. Instead, choose mild cleansers.
  • Shave carefully. To protect and lubricate your skin, apply shaving cream, lotion or gel before shaving. For the closest shave, use a clean, sharp razor. Shave in the direction the hair grows, not against it.
  • Pat dry. After washing or bathing, gently pat or blot your skin dry with a towel so that some moisture remains on your skin.
  • Moisturize dry skin. If your skin is dry, use a moisturizer that fits your skin type. For daily use, consider a moisturizer that contains SPF.

4. Eat a healthy diet

A healthy diet can help you look and feel your best. Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins. The association between diet and acne isn’t clear — but some research suggests that a diet rich in vitamin C and low in unhealthy fats and processed or refined carbohydrates might promote younger looking skin.

5. Manage stress

Uncontrolled stress can make your skin more sensitive and trigger acne breakouts and other skin problems. To encourage healthy skin — and a healthy state of mind — take steps to manage your stress. Set reasonable limits, scale back your to-do list and make time to do the things you enjoy. The results might be more dramatic than you expect.

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More Than Skin Deep

I uploaded a new photo to Facebook.  It always catches me off guard when it pops up JUMBO size.   I’m thinking, WHOA…

JUMBO shiny face.

It doesn’t bother me.  It bothers other people.  Okay, two.  TWO people. My sister and my niece laugh and ask,  “Why is your face so shiny?” in the same tone they ask, “Is THAT what you’re wearing?” right as I am about to dash out the door.

I don’t see the shine as a problem.  But I caught the following headline from SEVENTEEN MAGAZINE, which brought back a stab of teenage angst:

“GET A SHINE-FREE FACE: Some things may look better shiny, but never your face!”

NEVER?

Maybe it IS a problem.  Saturday Night Live would definitely file this under, “White People’s Problems.”  That’s when you don’t have any, and start making s@%t up.

Well, SEVENTEEN MAGAZINE has some remedies. Apparently, I was too busy working at that age to flip through beauty magazines. I was into reading  encyclopedias.  My Dad refused to buy them.  Salesmen sold them door-to-door back then.   If you had them, you were rich.

My aunt & uncle must have been loaded because they had a complete A to Z set.  So I ran around the block to their house every night to read them.  My uncle nicknamed me, “Maria, Go Home.”  I’d say, “NO! I’m not finished.”  I had to read very fast.  Clearly, he was annoyed at having to walk me home each night.

1976 was the worst.  David Berkowitz went on a notorious killing spree in Brooklyn.  That really cut into my encyclopedia reading.  I had to wear a scarf on my head and SPRINT around the block because he was randomly shooting brunettes in the head.  I was just  a kid.  Didn’t matter.

My genetic hair color made me look like a turkey out on Thanksgiving Eve.  Then the New York Post released Generic Man sketch.  I couldn’t even talk to anyone I knew without secretly thinking he was a killer.  After awhile, I started looking at family members with a raised eyebrow.  Where were YOU last night?

I digress.  Back to shiny things.  Below is my Facebook photo.  Shinier than an NBA championship trophy.  Did you think it was the one at the top of the page?

Below are thoughts from SEVENTEEN MAGAZINE readers who don’t have to worry about getting murdered.  It’s fun reading their home remedies, as I can tell they are real and not from people being paid to tell you something works.  Thank goodness beauty is more than skin deep.

Meanwhile, let’s look at  that article to find out what teens do for their overproduction of oil because let’s FACE it –they have more time to CLEAR things up.  Although, I’m a little concerned about Tiffany.  And Shanniqua?  You go girl.

SEVENTEEN MAGAZINE

GET A SHINE-FREE FACE

Some things may look better shiny, but never your face! Get an oil-free, healthy glow with these real-girl tips!

“My mom taught me to put rubbing alcohol on a cotton ball and rub that on your face. It grabs oil and leaves your face shine-free — it works every time!” –Stephanie, 14, Melville, NY

Clean & Clear oil-blotting sheets don’t clog pores, and after a couple of blots your skin goes from shiny to a healthy, smooth glow. Plus, a 50-sheet pack can fit anywhere, even the tiniest of purses!” –Danielle, 16, Vienna, VA

“Make a mask from eggs and sugar. It’s great for everyone!” –Haley, 15, Gastonia, NC

“Rub a drier sheet over your face right after getting out of the shower!” –Tiffany, 15, Boonville, IN

“Once a week, I mix the juice from an orange and some egg yolk and put it on my face for about 10 minutes. It sounds disgusting, but it totally works!” –Caitlin, 17, Toronto, ON, Canada

“Wear face moisturizer with a sheer powder on top of that. It keeps your skin shine-free for up to 10 hours!” –Krystal, 15, Havre, MT

“If I’m out and need to de-shine, I grab a toilet seat cover (unused!) from a public bathroom and use it like an oil-absorbing sheet. It works and it’s free!” –Shanniqua, 16, Ventura, CA

“Caress Body Soap dries up my skin a bit, and leaves my face not shiny or oily at all!” –Jenna, 15, Melrose, MN

“I mix baking soda and water and leave it on my skin for 10 minutes, then I rinse it and put witch hazel on. It makes my skin smooth and oil-free!” –Ashley, 14, Philadelphia, PA

“I use a light, gentle moisturizer every night. Keeping your skin hydrated (and clean) keeps your pores from producing oil.” –Rachel, 14, Rocky Hill, CT

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PROFESSIONAL SHINE-CONTROL:

CAMERAMEN CARRY GEL TO PREVENT T-ZONE SHINE on WHOEVER THEY’RE FILMING.   MATT CONLAN RECOMMENDED ONE WHICH I NOW OWN.   IT’S LANCOME PURE FOCUS, Gel Pudre’ T-Zone, Matite Express, T-Zone, Powder Gel For Instant Shine Control, Non-Gras, Oil-Free.  1.0 FL. OZ.  It is used under makeup & dabbed over makeup to retouch.   Here is what it looks like:


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    THE BOTTOM LINE IS WHEN IT COMES TO HEALTH SHINE IS NOT BAD.   DERMATOLOGISTS CALL IT “LUCK”.  BEST KIND OF SKIN.  So don’t sweat it if nothing works. I’m not.  Healthy skin is a combination of good nutrition, exercise, plenty of rest, lots of hydration (water) and being a person of integrity. That means honesty when communicating.  Also, be grateful your entire Summer isn’t ruined by having to worry about getting shot by a mad man.