New Healthy Vending Machine Partners with College

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Thrilled to learn about FRESH FRIG health vending kiosks becoming popular by demand. I’ve always been disappointed when I go to a vending machine and there are no healthy choices or the ones deemed healthy are simply better than the alternative.

People usually go to a vending machine when they can’t get to a store or a dining area at a school or workplace is closed. No one should feel held hostage to unhealthy choices.

It’s even worse when that vending machine is located within a hospital, school, workplace or gym –all places you expect to care about your health and wellness. There are some vending machines that toss in a few items you know are loaded with sugar or carbs as there are a lot of fake “healthy” foods out there. So, it’s refreshing when a real healthy choice is available.

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I interviewed Brad Callow, the CEO of 6AM HEALTH, who says his mission has always been to help people live healthier. He says he’s interested in psychology and behavioral economics. He knows from observation that people will make healthier choices or poorer choices depending on their environment.

So, he first started a delivery company called 5AM Juice to deliver a healthier choice.

He laughs as he recalls friends telling him the number 5 in the name looked like the letter “S” and people kept asking why he started a company called Sam Juice.

Then, he thought it’d be better to bring healthier foods to highly trafficked areas, like colleges, hospitals, airports, malls and large office parks.

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So far, so good. He placed them at Tuck University and there is one in South Station in Boston.

Callow says,

“You can reserve items in advance. If you know you’ll be arriving at Penn Station in New York City and there is a FRESH FRIG there, you can pre-select what you’d like from your phone. Scan upon arrival.”

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The FRESH FRIG is provided to locations free of cost as long as there are guaranteed sales from being in a highly trafficked area.

Fresh food selections include veggie salads and high protein items. They also include beverage choices of green juice, carrot apple juice, cleanse juice and coffee as well.

Individual item costs in the kiosk are from $6. – $9. which may seem high, but most nearby establishments charge $10. and above when open.

New “Healthy Vending Machine” Company 6AM Health Partners with Tuck Student Team

A team of Tuck students is working with 6AM Health, a specialty food business founded by Brad Callow T’13, to help bring the company to scale.

The first 6AM Health fresh fridge was installed in March in Tuck’s PepsiCo Dining Room.

MEDIA | INVESTOR INQUERIES: Contact Brad@6amhealth.com

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BY KIRK KARDASHIAN

Brad Callow T’13 is quick to find the common thread in his post-MBA career: health care.

In his first few jobs, this is clear. He began working in the therapeutics space, and then switched to diagnostics and health care technology. But in 2017, he went in a different direction. That’s when he founded 6AM Health, a specialty food business that focused on green juices. He soon expanded to fresh salads and meals, delivering them directly to his customers in the Boston Metro area before 6 a.m. For Callow, food is the first medicine—both preventative and healing.

“I realized that problems like obesity have a lot of co-morbidities,” he says, “so if we use food to minimize obesity, we can prevent a lot of other diseases at the same time.”

Instead of selling food to individual customers through a subscription delivery service, 6AM Health will begin installing “fresh fridges”—think healthy vending machines—at locations across the Northeast.

Now Callow is partnering with Tuck students on a First-Year Project (FYP) to take his company to scale. As he learned more and more about the food industry, he discovered that success is mostly about logistics. You can have the freshest, best-tasting food, but without an efficient way to deliver it to customers, it’s not worth much.

So instead of selling food to individual customers through a subscription delivery service, 6AM Health will begin installing “fresh fridges”—think healthy vending machines—at locations across the Northeast.

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The first one was installed in March at Tuck, in the PepsiCo Dining Room. He’s counting on the First-Year Project students to bring an entrepreneurial focus to the Fresh Fridge, testing pricing and product combinations and solving logistical problems.

“Having the FYP team will be incredibly helpful,” Callow says. “What we need to do is continue learning and sorting out what people like and don’t like. And I would love this to eventually be something like TuckStuff or theBOX, where it’s student-run and it becomes a permanent operation there.”

Callow is counting on the First-Year Project students to bring an entrepreneurial focus to the Fresh Fridge, testing pricing and product combinations and solving logistical problems.

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Elizabeth Kachavos T’20 knows theBOX well: she’s worked there since arriving at Tuck last summer. The FYP with 6AM Health was a natural choice for her, since she’s interested in the food industry and looking for more opportunities for real-world learning in that sector. “We’ve seen there’s a great demand for healthier fresh food on campus—especially on the weekends when the dining hall is closed,” she says. “I’d love to play a role in increasing those options at Tuck.”

Another member of the FYP team is Elisa Scudder D’14, T’20. She gravitated toward 6AM Health because she’s interested in product entry strategy and market entry.

“This fits that niche perfectly,” she says. “It’s not too early-stage: the business model is set up but it’s just expanding into this new market.”

Scudder is also excited about working on a project that can have a real impact on campus. “We’re going to physically see what we’re working on and hear our classmates talk about how they like it or don’t like it,” Scudder says.

HAVING THE FYP TEAM WILL BE INCREDIBLY HELPFUL. WHAT WE NEED TO DO IS CONTINUE LEARNING AND SORTING OUT WHAT PEOPLE LIKE AND DON’T LIKE. AND I WOULD LOVE THIS TO EVENTUALLY BE SOMETHING LIKE TUCKSTUFF OR THEBOX, WHERE IT’S STUDENT-RUN AND IT BECOMES A PERMANENT OPERATION THERE.

At first, the Fresh Fridge will be stocked with food prepared at 6AM Health’s kitchen outside Boston, and will be re-stocked every week. During the course of the FYP, Callow hopes the team can find a more local farm to partner with, and the most efficient and cost-effective way to prepare and package the items. It might involve working with the Byrne servery, or the team from theBOX.

“This FYP is really about e-ship,” Callow says. “What’s the best, most sustainable way to keep this going? I’m also just fired up to work with Tuckies.”

This story will appear in the summer 2019 issue of Tuck Today magazine.

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Check Out This Healthy Food Vending Machine Coming to South Station

Waltham-based meal prep company 6AM Health is making moves with what they’re calling a Fresh Fridge.
by TESSA YANNONE

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While vending machines have traditionally had a bad reputation for stocking unhealthy snacks, sodas, and candies the wellness world is busy revamping them. Last week, this one was installed at Brandeis University with healthcare products like condoms and Plan B. And at the beginning of May, meal prep company 6AM Health is installing one at South Station with a ton of healthy food.

The Waltham-based meal delivery service has been delivering healthy fare to the Boston area since 2017. Their process works much like any other meal prep service. You choose from a menu of pre-made meals and snacks like fresh salads, overnight oats, grain bowls, and juices. Then, they’ll have them delivered to your door-step before you even rise in the morning. Hence the name, 6AM Health.

Owner and founder, Brad Callow tells me the initial idea for the company was that if they can change people’s environment, by providing easy access to affordable and healthy food, they can help them make better nutrition choices. But they quickly realized just how much running around the city they were doing. And they saw a need for something just a little more convenient. Enter: the healthy food vending machine.

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On May 6, whether you’re traveling out of town or commuting through South Station, you’ll be able to easily purchase meals or snacks from 6AM Health in a vending machine.

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They’re calling it a Fresh Fridge and each item is packaged in mason jars, making it easy to eat on the go. And they’re not just stopping with one fridge. Callow says they hope to have 30 all around the Boston area by the end of June. Right now, there is currently one at Dartmouth in New Hampshire. And later this week a few more will be installed at places like the North Shore Mall.

Inside the vending machine you’ll find everything you see on their online menu. Callow explains that since things like salads have a shorter shelf life, there is some more maintenance involved in re-stocking and keeping the food fresh. They do plan to re-stock it every day.

“Grab-and-go food doesn’t need to be fast food or something that’s crappy for you,” he says. “Food is super impulsive. If we place these Fresh Fridges in convenient locations we can change the way people eat on the go.”

Eventually, the whole operation will be even more convenient with a mobile app, currently in the works. Through the app, customers will not only be able to find the nearest Fresh Fridge to them but they will also be able to search and reserve certain menu items at a specific location. So, if you’re really craving a buffalo chicken bowl you can be sure that when you get to the fridge there’s one waiting for you.

And the best part? Bowls and salads will cost you around $7-$8 and a 10 ounce juice will only put you back $5. Compare that to a $10+ Sweet Green salad and a $6.50 small juice from Jugos. You can also request to have a Fresh Fridge at your office, park, or building if you want.

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This new concept checks all the boxes on convenience, accessibility, and affordability. And we’re totally here for it—just as long as the juices remain cold and the salads stay crunchy.

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MEDIA | INVESTOR INQUERIES: Contact Brad@6amhealth.com

Or Visit: http://www.6amhealth.com

We love it.

Longevity: Secrets To Aging Well Longer

SALT2019 is a global thought leadership forum devoted to unlocking growth opportunities in finance, economoics, entrepreneurship, public policy, technology and philanthropy. Founded in 2009, it brings together 2000 of the world’s foremost investors, policy experts, politicians and business leaders.

#SALT2019 #SALTConference #MoochandtheMrs

Diamandis gave a presentation at the SALT Conference advances in medical/health and how the future will have people living far longer than they ever dreamed of and also being able to detect illness or disease earlier —before it becomes fatal.
More on Peter Diamandis’s talk later, but know it was EPIC!

Genetics and environmental factors aside, you actually have a lot of control over how well you age and how long you live. It’s good news because every day you have an opportunity to make better, healthier choices.

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In 2012, U.S. News and World Reports published the How to Live to 100 Project.

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Lindsay Lyon, staff writer and senior editor for the Consumer Advice section, compiled research findings by different age groups. She found there are over 20 basic lifestyle choices you can control to age well naturally. Many seem like basic things you should already know, but they’re worth repeating.

 

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All ages:

STAY ACTIVE

 

Cut your chances of being mowed down prematurely by major scourges like heart disease and cancer by exercising regularly. Get your heart rate up for 150 minutes each week through moderately intense aerobic activities, such as brisk walking, or for 75 weekly minutes through more intense activities, such as jogging.

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Strength training at least twice a week is also important, according to the CDC.

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STAY LEAN

Extra pounds can set the stage for arthritis and mobility problems.

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EAT WISELY

Fruit, vegetables, and fish are staples of a healthy diet.

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LIMIT OR AVOID RED MEAT

Limit red meat to no more than 18 (cooked weight) ounces per week, suggests the American Institute for Cancer Research.

Harvard School of Public Health researchers recently linked daily consumption of red meat—particularly processed varieties—with increased risk of premature death, especially from cancer and heart disease.

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DRINK WATER – LIMIT OR AVOID ALCOHOL COMPLETELY

Limit alcohol: no more than two daily drinks for men and one for women.

 

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FLOSS DAILY

Floss daily to prevent the buildup of gum-disease-causing bacteria, which are increasingly being implicated in heart disease.

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PRIORITIZE SLEEP

Too little sleep can  lower your immunity and invite obesity to accidents. One sleepless night can be the equivalent of being drunk, so you don’t want to drive. Consistently getting at least 9 hours of sleep is best. 10 hours for teenagers.

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KICK THE HABIT

Even at older ages, quitting smoking may still add years to your life. Here’s a research-tested trick: When the urge to light up strikes, imagine, say, having to breathe through a tracheotomy tube as opposed to the feel-good sensation of taking a drag. Evoking smoking’s serious potential consequences helps quell cravings.

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KEEP YOUR BRAIN STIMULATED 

Flex your mental muscle by writing, reading, or playing games, such as crossword puzzles. Despite there being no proven way to cut the chances of Alzheimer’s, some research suggests that keeping the brain active from childhood on may somewhat armor against the disease.

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WEAR SUNSCREEN

Apply and reapply sunscreen and sport a brimmed hat and UV-blocking shades whenever it’s sunny to avoid skin cancer and cataracts.

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LIMIT EXPOSURE TO RADIATION

Excessive testing—even preventive screenings—and over-reliance on medications, such as antibiotics, can actually be harmful. Before taking any medication or agreeing to any procedure, discuss with your doctor the pros and cons. If you’re uncertain, don’t hesitate to get a second opinion.

BEWARE ANTI-AGING TREATMENTS

Watch out for anti-aging treatments: Nothing can turn back the clock and some therapies can be dangerous. Your money and health are on the line.

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You can get a ballpark idea of how long you can expect to live with centenarian researcher Thomas Perls’Life Expectancy Calculator. The roughly 10-minute, 40-question test helps reveal the affect your health-related behaviors could have on your longevity, and suggests ways to adjust your lifestyle to add years.

20s and 30s:

HABITS IN 20S & 30S AFFECT AGING

 

Your lifestyle now can affect how well (or poorly) you age.

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DEVELOP POSITIVE COPING MECHANISMS FOR STRESSORS

Develop “positive coping skills,” or healthy ways to manage life’s stressors. Deadline looming? Rather than shoveling chips into your mouth, go on a run or bike ride. Meditate. Now’s the time to lay down a lifelong foundation for healthy living.

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BE POSITIVE

Cultivate a positive outlook on aging. No one wants to grow old, but evidence
suggests a link between harboring a negative view and heart attack and stroke susceptibility.

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PROTECT YOUR HEARING

Safeguard your hearing. Noises over 85 decibels, roughly the volume of a hair dryer, can inflict permanent damage.

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MAINTAIN A HEALTHY WEIGHT FOR YOUR HEIGHT

Maintain a healthy weight.

40s and 50s:

LIMIT PROCESSED FOODS AND SUGARS

Limit processed foods that combine sugar and fat; research suggests this combo is highly addictive.

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UTILIZE WEIGHTS

Keep up with weekly strength-training sessions to maintain lean muscle mass.

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NATURAL SUNLIGHT IS BEST TO GET YOUR DAILY VITAMIN D

Don’t skimp on calcium and vitamin D—both promote bone health. This chart, from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), outlines recommended daily intake by age and gender.

Men and women ages 51 to 70 are generally advised to get 1,000 milligrams and 1,200 mg of calcium, respectively, and 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D each day.

(Read labels. Don’t overdo any supplement –or you can damage liver and kidneys)

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60s and up:

GET YOUR EYES CHECKED ANNUALLY

Once you turn 65, make sure to get an annual eye exam. Age-related vision problems can arise slowly, often unnoticed.

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FALL PROOF YOUR HOME

Take care to avoid falls—the No. 1 cause of injury-related death for the 65-plus set. Potential preventives include balance-building activities such as tai chi, and making practical changes around the house, like installing “grab bars” near the shower.

 

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CONTINUE TO EXERCISE DAILY

Maintain your fitness to prolong good health and ability to live independently. If 150 minutes of physical activity per week seems daunting, try dividing it into three 10-minute blocks, five days per week.

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KEEP UP WITH ANNUAL SCREENINGS

Stay up to date on recommended cancer screening tests, such as colonoscopies, and immunizations, such as flu and pneumonia shots, especially ages 50 plus.

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KNOW SIGNS OF A STROKE AND CALL 911 IMMEDIATELY

Know the warning signs of top killers, such as stroke. Call 911 immediately if you notice symptoms. For stroke, they include numbness in your face and limbs, sudden difficulty seeing or speaking, dizziness, and/or a sudden severe headache.

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CHECK out How to Live 100 ebook now available.

 

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Fun Fact:

Healthy, positive, supportive relationships are a big part of aging well. Turns out, married men are healthier, wealthier and live longer. The longest-running study of longevity ever conducted is the Terman Life-Cycle Study, begun in 1921. 1,528 men and women, were 11-years old when the study started, were followed for their lifetime. The group who lived the longest were those who got married and stayed married. The study revealed consistency made a positive difference in their lives. You’re more likely to stick to healthy habits when your partner is like-minded.

U.S. News How to Live to 100 project,

Saturday, April 13, tune into Dr. Sanjay Gupta on CHASING LIFE. He travels the world to find not so common secrets to living well longer. 9pmET/PT on CNN.

CHECK OUT HIS BOOK HERE:

 

Be sure to click Follow on this blog for the best in Health

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Maria Dorfner

Maria Dorfner is a health journalist and producer, who began her career at NBC in 1983 working behind-the-scenes on the Today Show. Three years after commuting from Brooklyn, New York, she moved to New York City. In 1989, she purchased her first car, which she needed to drive from New York City to Ft. Lee, New Jersey with fellow producers to help launch CNBC. She then worked as a reporter for Top Cops, syndicated by CBS and as a producer for The Rush Limbaugh Show and Profiles with Liz Smith pilots, nationally syndicated. In 1993, she created and produced Healthy Living, Lifestyles and Longevity, Healthcare Consumers and more. The shows generated more revenue and profits for the production company than any others in their history. She covered health for NBC Miami and  produced the weekly JAMA Report airing on all networks, co-founded and launched Cleveland Clinic News Service. While based in North Carolina for two years, she field produced and directed  21st Century Medicine for Discovery. She traveled extensively for the documentary series, conducting interviews with pioneers in medicine.

She is the recipient a Medical Reporting Scholarship from the American Medical Association, Freddie Award for Excellence in Medical Reporting,  Media Recognition Award from the American Heart Association for her series, Heart Smart airing on NBC, nominated for an Alfred I. DuPont Award for best new talk show, Outstanding Leadership Abilities Award from Pace University and National Association of Female Executives, an Advanced Writing Scholarship from NBC, Commitment to the Advancement of Women in Media Award, and a 2019 Albert Nelson Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in her field.  Maria mentors journalism and marketing students at her alma mater, Pace University, where she was a member of the National English Honor Society and won Miss Pace University and an Outstanding Achievement Award from Pace and March of Dimes. She was awarded an Advanced Writing scholarship for graduate work at Columbia University from NBC NEWS and wrote The Ivy League Roundup covering health.

She is the author of Healthy Within and PRESSure: Break Into Broadcasting and an Italian cookbook based on her grandmother’s recipes. Health Heart and Humor in an Italian-American Kitchen.

You can follow her on Twitter at @Maria_Dorfner | maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

She is the founder of NewsMD.

This is her blog.