Best Food Sources and Vitamins for Diabetics

Sugar (sucrose) is a highly addictive drug, aggressively marketed to you. Government has used billions of your tax dollars to fund study after study to find out what causes diabetes, depression, heart disease, ADD, ADHA, obesity, Alzheimer’s, some cancers, and inflammation in the body and brain.

The common link was the highly addictive drug, SUGAR.

It’s not the kind in fruits and vegetables. It’s refined sugars in practically everything else. Did the government or any government agency care about your health and ban refined sugars in foods and beverages and the advertisement and selling of it, especially to children? Did they ban the sale of it in schools? Workplaces?

No. They funded pharmaceutical Research & Development (R&D) to treat Diabetes.

Chocolate brands paid physicians and bogus non-profit agencies to state, “There is no evidence that sugar…”

And they bought more advertisement on TV and sent out press releases which medical correspondents rip and read saying, “New (bogus) study says chocolate is good for you…” Most holidays sell you more of this drug.

Then, the following buzz words are used to downplay anyone with a high IQ who knows the truth:

“Experts” (paid-for flacks) will use words like:

Stigma

Stigmatize

Anti-(whatever)

Hesitancy

OK in Moderation (if it’s highly-addictive, there is no such thing)

Those words are used anytime an unhealthy food brand, for profit disguised as non-profit agency or government are on a mission to create more customers for the pharmaceutical industry, who gives money to politicians, and currently have the most lobbyists in D.C.

Anyone profiting from you getting or being sick wants you to get or stay that way.

Here’s an example of gaslighting you. They want people sick, so if you are obese and probably diabetic or pre-diabetic, instead of saving you from potential foot amputations, blindness, disability, pain, premature death all the negative things that comes with diabetes, it is called and showcased as, “Body Positivity.” That way you take pride of your addiction and stay in your state of denial.

The Government does not care about your Health or you. They will legalize anything, as long as they can profit it. They will allow anything that harms or kills you to remain if they profit it. The tide only turns when people wake up. Here’s another tip.

Whenever you see the words “racism, racist, sexist, hate crimes, protests” “homophobic” “gender” it’s to make you fight with each other instead of looking at how they studied, knew and allow what harms or kills you anyway. The studies funded with your tax dollars are used against you. The Government even funded studies on what Isolation does to people, especially the elderly. They found it causes depression, exacerbates any underlying condition and causes premature death.

What did they do with those results? They isolated the elderly.

The people asking YOU to follow the science have not followed it themselves. They have followed the money.

They’re going after HEALTHY PEOPLE now too. There is zero, zero reason for any sugar to be in vitamins. They placed it in our vitamins. Then, they made sugar dummies to appeal to kids.

Selling what they know is a highly addictive drug, known to cause diabetes, obesity, heart disease, etc. is abhorrent. Two of those gummy vitamins daily add up to the same sugar in a candy bar for kids.

Make no mistake. They are attempting to make healthy people unhealthy and get to them younger and younger. Whenever a billion dollar study is funded it’s not to help you –it’s to help fund a treatment you never needed in the first place.

We already know the cause. Get rid of the cause, instead of popping a pill.

That pill will cause more long-term inflammation inside of you, and not get rid of the initial inflammation. By now, pharmaceutical companies are also aware the long-term effects will happen down the line, and you won’t think to connect it to your current health issues or premature death. It will also have the lovely side effect of suicide or whatever else is on the mile long, microscopic or read too fast in a TV ad warning label.

Media has led you to believe telling people the truth about health prevents people from getting help. HELP is removing the cause of your mental or physical ailments.

Depressed? Remove sugar. Anxious or unable to sleep? Remove caffeine. You can find articles on How To Detox from Sugar or How To Detox from Caffeine.

Oversimplification?

Ha. Giving everyone with different bodies and genes the same pill is what is “OVERSIMPLIFICATION.”

Those pills are highly addictive too. Once you’re addicted to sugar you’ve let them know you’ll be addicted to whatever they sell you –more $ for them.

There is a proliferation of fake health websites, fake blue check mark reporters and fake fact-checkers out there, who are pushing that there is misinformation out there and THEY are the misinformation.

When you purchase vitamins look for ones without sugar. Bring a magnifying glass to check labels.

BY MANEERA SAXENA BEHL

Eating a varied diet rich in natural sources of vitamins is a good idea for diabetics. Nutritional support is critical for diabetics because diabetes  tends to drain nutrients. 

When levels of glucose are high in the blood, the body tries to ‘wash’ the excess sugar out.

This is why diabetics need to use the washroom frequently. Unfortunately, diabetics also lose nutrients via their urine. Research studies show that diabetics are repeatedly found to be deficient in important water-soluble vitamins and minerals.

What’s more, the loss of these vitamins worsens the body’s ability to manage blood sugar, creating a vicious cycle.  

Combining a healthy diabetes nutrition plan and a daily exercise routine with the best vitamin supplements for diabetics goes a long way in achieving stable blood sugar levels.

What Vitamins Are Diabetics Deficient In?

The term vitamin is short for “Vital Amino Acid”. This means that these are vital for the proper functioning of hundreds of chemical processes in the body which the body cannot manage by itself. Proper blood sugar control is one such function for which vitamins are critical. There are 13 essential vitamins that the human body requires and they must be obtained from an external source — through food and/or supplements.

Diabetics need two kinds of vitamins:

Water Soluble – Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, C, Biotin, and Folate are water-soluble and cannot be stored in the body for longer periods of time. Diabetics are often deficient in these vitamins since they pass greater amounts of urine daily. As their body tries to get rid of extra sugar, diabetics lose more water-soluble vitamins than most others. That’s why diabetics need to to get these vitamins daily in doses larger than what normal people need. Luckily, you can get all of these in a single, high potency multivitamin, which you can take twice a day, and thus make up for most of the vitamins lost.

Fat Soluble – Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble, which is yet another reason why we  highly recommend a Low Carb-High Fat (LCHF) diet for diabetics. If you eat a diet that is high in good fats, the fat soluble vitamins can be stored in the body for longer periods of time.RELATED: 8 Top Research-Backed Diabetes Superfoods

What Do The 13 Vitamins do?

Let’s take a look at all 13 essential vitamins and then figure out the best vitamins for diabetes type 2. Remember: diabetes is not just about blood sugar control., Rather, it’s about reducing inflammation in the body. So these vitamins help foster good health in many ways.

We’re also giving you the best food sources for these vitamins. Recommended Daily Allowance or RDA for each as per government guidelines is included. Please note that doctors of nutritional medicine often recommend higher doses, based on latest research and their clinical experience. Government guidelines take time to be updated . With fat soluble vitamins, it is advisable to consult your doctor.

1. Vitamin A (Retinol and Beta Carotene)

Vitamin A can help prevent diabetic retinopathy

With strong antioxidant properties, Vitamin A helps improve immune health by facilitating healthy mucus membranes that can fight diseases better. It’s crucial  in building strong teeth and bones. It also helps delay Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, heart diseases and age-related muscular degeneration problems. For diabetics, the carotenoids in Vitamin A can help prevent diabetic retinopathy (a condition which leads to loss of eyesight and fuzzy vision).

Good food sources of Vitamin A include dairy products, eggs, fish liver oil, beef, kidney, chicken, leafy vegetables, carrots, sweet potatoes, winter squash, apricots and cantaloupe.

RDA: 700-900mcg (2300-3000 IU)

What doctors recommend: 10,000IU

2. Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Seeds are good sources for Vitamin B1

The job of Vitamin B1 is to help convert food into energy. It’s essential for healthy skin, hair, brain, heart, and for normal nerve functioning. It may also help prevent indigestion, heart disease and kidney stones. Vitamin B1 is critical for nerve health in diabetics specifically.. Thiamine can offer protection from the nerve damage that diabetics face due to excess sugar in their blood.

Good food sources of Vitamin B1 include pork chops, ham, liver, dried beans, nuts and seeds.

RDA: 1.2mg

What doctors recommend: 50mg

3. Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Soya contains Vitamin B2 which improves the body’s metabolic activity, boosts the immune system, and promotes the health of the nervous system

Vitamin B2 improves the body’s metabolic activity, boosts the immune system and promotes the health of the nervous system.

Good food sources of Vitamin B2 include dairy products, soybeans, whole grains, meat and poultry, liver, eggs and mushrooms.

RDA: 1.3mg

What doctors recommend: 50mg

4. Vitamin B3 (Niacin, nicotinic acid)

Vitamin B3 helps for fatigue, indigestion, high blood pressure and blood cholesterol, diabetes, skin disorders, and migraines.

This vitamin is important for the nervous system, digestive system, skin health, hair and brain. Vitamin B3 also helps convert food into a readily available source of energy. It’s especially helpful for those who suffer from fatigue, indigestion, high blood pressure and blood cholesterol, diabetes, skin disorders and migraines.

Good food sources of Vitamin B3 include meat, mushrooms, poultry, whole grains, peanut butter and potatoes.

RDA: 16mg

What doctors recommend: 130mg[mc4wp_form id=”12950″]

5. Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)

Poultry products contain Vitamin B 5 which help with neurological problems and a burning sensation in the feet

Vitamin B5 aids in converting the food we eat, into energy that fuels bodily functions. It also helps make lipids and hemoglobin. Deficiency can cause neurological problems and a burning sensation in the feet (both of which are also common in diabetics).

Good food sources of Vitamin B5 include whole grains, mushrooms, broccoli, tomatoes, avocadoand poultry.

RDA: 5mg

What doctors recommend: 150mg

6. Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

Vitamin B6 is the best diabetic vitamin supplements- Oats, Bananas and Nuts

The job of Vitamin B6 is to help the body use up proteins and glycogen. It also helps form hemoglobin which carries blood in the body. Its deficiency can cause or worsen seizures in infants. One of the best diabetic vitamin supplements, Vitamin B6 supports nerve health, which is critical in addressing conditions such as diabetic neuropathy.

Good food sources of Vitamin B6 are meat, potatoes, poultry, soybeans, bananas, nuts, bran, oats, lentils, chickpeas and sunflower seeds.

RDA: 1.7mg

What doctors recommend: 110mgRELATED: 3 Amazing Benefits Of Vitamin B6 For Diabetics

7. Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

Vitamin B7 aids in glucose synthesis

Vitamin B7 aids in glucose synthesis and helps break down fatty acids. It allows the body to use proteins, fats and carbohydrates from the food consumed.

Good food sources of Vitamin B7 include whole grains, non-fat milk and yogurt, sweet potatoes, peanuts, almonds, eggs, liver, poultry meat, organic meats and fortified soy milk.

RDA: 30mcg

What doctors recommend: 300mcg

8. Vitamin B12 (Methylcobalamin)

Dairy products contain vitamin B12 which is the best vitamin for diabetics who suffer from neuropathy

Vitamin B12 boosts the central nervous system and helps improve body metabolism while also synthesizing red blood cells. It’s one of the best vitamins for diabetics who suffer from neuropathy and a compromised immune system.

Good food sources of Vitamin B12 are animal food sources such as meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, milk and other dairy products.

RDA: 2.4mcg

What doctors recommend: 100mcg

9. Folate

Vitamin B9 protect against certain types of cancers

Folate (not to be confused with Folic Acid) is vital for new cell creation, which is why it’s recommended during pregnancy. It may also protect against certain types of cancers.

Good food sources of Folate are asparagus, spinach, okra, broccoli, legumes like chickpeas and black-eyed peas, tomato juice and orange juice.

RDA: 400mcg

What doctors recommend: 400mcg

10. Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)

Vitamin C is an antioxidant that helps boosting the immune system

Vitamin C is an antioxidant that boosts the immune system, maintains healthy tissues and promotes the body’s ability to absorb iron. It also helps lower levels of sorbitol – the sugar that can collect in and damage cells in the eyes, kidneys and nerves. All this makes it a good vitamin for diabetes.

Good food sources of Vitamin C include citrus fruits, broccoli, potatoes, bell peppers, spinach, tomatoes, Brussel sprouts and strawberries.

RDA: 90mg

What doctors recommend: 1,000mg

11. Vitamin D

Vitamin D is essential for good bone health

Vitamin D is essential for good bone health as it plays a crucial role in allowing the body to absorb calcium and phosphorus, making bones and teeth stronger and healthier. It boosts production of antimicrobial peptides called ‘cathelicidins’, which destroy viruses, bacteria and other germs. Since diabetics are highly prone to infections due to diabetic ulcers and gum diseases, it is important to make sure the body has optimal levels of this fat-soluble vitamin.

Good food sources of Vitamin D include milk, fish, eggs, organ meats fish liver oils, and rice beverages.

RDA: 800IU

What doctors recommend: 1,000IURELATED: Is Vitamin E Good For Diabetics?

12. Vitamin E

Green Leafy vegetables are rich in Vitamin E

The body’s premium fat-soluble antioxidant, Vitamin E, improves glucose control and protects blood vessels and nerves from free radical damage which is accelerated by diabetes. This makes it one of the best vitamins for diabetics. Studies have shown that high doses of supplemental vitamin E may even reverse damage to nerves caused by diabetes and protect against diabetic cataracts and atherosclerosis.

Good food sources of Vitamin E include vegetable oils, leafy green vegetables, avocados, some nuts, sunflower seeds, peanut butter and wheat germ.

RDA: 33IU

What doctors recommend: 300IU

13. Vitamin K

Eggs are a rich source of Vitamin K

Vitamin K is essential for activating proteins as well as calcium which aids inblood clotting and can also protect against fractures.

Good food sources of Vitamin K include liver, broccoli, spinach, sprouts, kale, eggs, collard and other leafy green vegetables.

RDA: 90-120mcg

What doctors recommend: 120mcg

Best Vitamin Supplements For Diabetics: What You Should Have for Sure!

Supplementing your body with the best vitamins for diabetics helps increase intake of nutrients that support your body’s ability to use insulin, thus keeping your blood sugar at healthy levels.

Here’s what the scientific research supports, the diabetic supplements that work.

1. Multivitamin:

Taking a high-quality multivitamin and mineral supplement everyday dramatically reduces infections and sick days in diabetics.

According to a study published in American Journal of Epidemiology in 2001, men who took multivitamins had reduced risk of diabetes. Women too benefited, though the gains were marginally lower.

If you prefer to take a high potency multivitamin, you may not need to take individual vitamins separately. However, if you have specific problems that are better addressed by such vitamins or if you have deficiency of a vitamin like vitamin D3, you may want to dose these individually.

2. Vitamin B3:

Researchers from University of Iowa have discovered that Niacin, or Vitamin B3, helped lower blood sugar, reduce fatty liver and also prevent neuropathy in mice with diabetes type 2. The lead authors of the study conducted in May 2016 proved that Niacin protected the pre-diabetic and diabetic mice against nerve damage and helped maintain their normal sensitivity to heat. These findings provide a scientific rationale for conducting human trials to test the effects of Vitamin B3 on metabolic disorders including prediabetes and T2D, as well as obesity, fatty liver disease and neuropathies.

3. Vitamin B6 and B12

A Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was conducted at 5 university medical centers in Canada between May 2001 and July 2007. 238 diabetic participants who received B-vitamin therapy had reduced kidney damage caused by diabetes. Their arterial health improved too. Diabetics with kidney issues are often found to have too much of the harmful chemical homocystiene in their blood. B-vitamin therapy – with folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 have been shown to lower the blood levels of homocysteine.

4. Vitamin C

According to a report published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, diabetes mellitus may lower serum vitamin C concentrations in the blood. Data obtained from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988–1994) showed that mean blood Vitamin C concentrations were significantly lower in persons with newly diagnosed diabetes than in those without diabetes. Another NCBI study found that Vitamin C improves widening of arteries to allow suffient blood flow in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

5. Vitamin D

Published in Endocrine Society, a report concluded that insufficiency of Vitamin D and calcium may negatively influence blood sugar control. It was also found that combined supplementation of both nutrients may be beneficial to control blood sugar. Another Spanish study ascertained that Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to alter insulin synthesis and secretion. Insulin is responsible for escorting sugar into the cells and removing it from the blood.

6. Vitamin E

An Italian study published in American Diabetes Association journal Diabetes Care showed that Vitamin E administration could reduce protein glycosylation in diabetic subjects.

When to Have Vitamins?

The best time to have your vitamins would be with your food. This allows for the nutrients to be absorbed far more easily into the body. Ideally, your vitamins should be split into even doses across the day – morning and night.

Beyond Vitamins: What Else Can Help Manage Diabetics?

Besides the above mentioned best vitamins for Type 2 diabetics, it’s important to note that other supplements like Magnesium, Chromium and Omega 3 fatty acids are also extremely beneficial for diabetes.

RELATED READING: Deaths from Diabetes Worldwide

https://www.statista.com/statistics/495457/deaths-due-to-diabetes-worldwide-number-by-region/


Sugar and Autism and ADHD or ADD: https://www.amenclinics.com/blog/5-foods-can-make-autism-worse/

Remedies For Stress-Related Hair Loss

Hair Health: Click on “View Original Post” to view the entire blog on tips to help your hair grow

NewsMD: What's Hot in Health

stressed woman looking at a laptop
Photo by Anna Shvets onPexels.com

Many people who had Covid-19 are experiencing hair loss. Stress from being diagnosed with it can also wreak havoc on tresses. Others are experiencing hair thinning simply from stress since the pandemic began.

The good news is it’s notpermanent. Read on for more information aboutstress and hair loss.

Is stress-related hair loss permanent?
If your hair loss is caused by stress, it’s possible for your hair to grow back in time. The rate of regrowth will be different for everyone.

If your hair loss has been triggered by stress, managing your stress could be the key to returning to a healthy rate of hair growth.

calm

What you can do
There are a number of things that you can do to reduce hair loss and encourage new growth.

Diet and nutrition

Eating a balanced, nutritious diet of whole foods is necessary for the health of…

View original post 685 more words

Free Mental Help Apps Available for All Issues



While apps are not a replacement for talking to someone in person or Tele-Therapy, where you can talk to someone on-line, they can be of help if you don’t have access to anyone during this time.

Scroll through the list to find out if any can be of help.

My3

Designed to help those stay safe while having thoughts of suicide, MY3 is free and lets you customize your own personal safety plan by noting your warning signs, listing coping strategies, and connecting you to helpful resources to reach out to when you need them most. At your fingertips is a button that puts you in direct contact (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) with a trained counselor from the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline as well as a 911 alert. Additionally, you can choose three people to contact in the event you’re having thoughts of suicide. (Free; iOS and Android)

notOK

NotOK

notOK is a free app developed by a struggling teenager (and her teen brother) for teenagers. The app features a large, red button that can be activated to let close friends, family and their support network know help is needed. Users can add up to five trusted contacts as part of their support group so when they hit the digital panic button, a message along with their current GPS location is sent to their contacts. The message reads: “Hey, I’m not OK! Please call, text, or come find me.” (Free; iOS and Android)

General Mental Health Apps

What’s Up

What's Up

What’s up is a free app that uses Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)and Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) methods to help you cope with Depression, Anxiety, Stress, and more. Use the positive and negative habit tracker to maintain your good habits, and break those that are counterproductive. We particularly love the “Get Grounded” page, which contains over 100 different questions to pinpoint what you’re feeling, and the “Thinking Patterns” page, which teaches you how to stop negative internal monologues. Try it out for yourself. (Free; iOS and Android)

Addiction Apps

While apps are not a replacement for in-person help, they can provide people suffering with recovery resources at the palm of their hands to help track sobriety, monitor triggering behaviors, and give instant access to support. If you are experiencing an addiction and need help, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-4357.

Twenty-Four Hours a Day

twenty-four hours a day

Based on the best-selling book of the same name, Twenty-Four Hours a Day offers 366 meditations from the book, making it easier for people in recovery from addiction to focus on sobriety wherever they are. (Free iOSand Android)

Quit That! – Habit Tracker

quit that!

Quit That! is a completely free app that helps users beat their habits or addictions. Whether you’re looking to stop drinking alcohol, quit smoking, or stop taking drugs, it’s the perfect recovery tool to track and monitor your progress. Track as many vices as you want and find out how many minutes, hours, days, weeks, or years it’s been since you quit. (Free; iOS)

Anxiety Apps

Those with chronic anxiety know the feeling: The angst is always there—lurking around like a stage-five clinger. It’s the kind of condition that, for the 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older who have an anxiety disorder, can be all-consuming when left to its own devices. But anxiety can also be manageable once you learn how to work through all that worry. Seeking help from a mental health professional is the best way to manage anxiety, but, the following apps are great tools to use along the way—like reminding you to focus on your breathing to get out of a vicious thought cycle.

MindShift

mindshift cbt

MindShift is one of the best mental health apps designed specifically for teens and young adults with anxiety. Rather than trying to avoid anxious feelings, Mind Shift stresses the importance of changing how you think about anxiety. Think of this app as the cheerleader in your pocket, encouraging you to take charge of your life, ride out intense emotions, and face challenging situations. (Free; iOS and Android)

Self-Help for Anxiety Management (SAM)

self-management for anxiety SAM

SAM might be perfect for you if you’re interested in self-help, but meditation isn’t your thing. Users are prompted to build their own 24-hour anxiety toolkit that allows you to track anxious thoughts and behavior over time, and learn 25 different self-help techniques. You can also use SAM’s “Social Cloud” feature to confidentially connect with other users in an online community for additional support. (Free; iOS and Android)

CBT Thought Record Diary

CBT thought record diary

The centerpiece of cognitive-behavioral therapy is changing your emotions by identifying negative and distorted thinking patterns. You can use CBT Thought Record Diary to document negative emotions, analyze flaws in your thinking, and reevaluate your thoughts. This is a great app for gradually changing your approach to anxiety-inducing situations and your thinking patterns for future situations. (Free; iOS and Android)

Bipolar Disorder Apps

Just like its name suggests, bipolar disorder is characterized by polar opposite mood swings that go from extreme highs to the lowest of lows. It’s a largely genetic condition that affects up to 5.7 million adults. While bipolar disorder is a serious mental health condition that requires medication and psychotherapy, along with those treatments, apps can be a useful tool to help those with the condition understand and track their moods, identify triggers, and get a handle on the severity of their symptoms. For more help and information about the condition, contact the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA), which offers online and in-person support groups, or the International Bipolar Association Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

eMoods

emoods bipolar disorder app

eMoods is a mood tracking app designed specifically for people with bipolar disorder. Throughout the day, users can track depressive and psychotic symptoms, elevated mood, and irritability and give an indication of the severity of their symptoms. Users can then see their mood changes on a color-coded monthly calendar and even export a monthly summary report to identify specific triggers and better understand their fluctuating mood.  (Free; iOS and Android)

Depression Apps

If you have depression, life can seem like a giant pit of quicksand that’s constantly pulling you under with no way out. Let’s just say, it’s a heavy state of being. And it’s also one of the most common mental health conditions, affecting about 350 million people. If left alone, depression can continue to linger and linger, taking a toll on your quality of life. But there is a bright side: It’s treatable. Seeking help from a mental health professional is the first step. And for those in therapy, there are also some good apps that can do everything from helping to boost your mood to connecting you with a trained professional who can offer virtual counseling. If you are struggling or in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Happify

Happify

Need a happy fix? With its psychologist-approved mood-training program, the Happify app is your fast-track to a good mood. Try various engaging games, activity suggestions, gratitude prompts and more to train your brain as if it were a muscle, to overcome negative thoughts. The best part? Its free!  (Free; iOS and Android)

MoodTools

Mood Tools

MoodTools aims to support people with clinical depression by aiding the path to recovery. Discover helpful videos that can improve your mood and behavior, log and analyze your thoughts using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) principles, develop a suicide safety plan and more with this free app. (Free; iOS and Android)

Eating Disorder Apps

Thinking about food, weight, and body image is a constant battle for the millions of Americans with an eating disorder. In fact, it can consume so much of their waking hours that it often gets in the way of daily functioning. For referrals to treatment options, general concerns, or support, call the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders Helpline at 630-577-1330. And while you’re recovering, the below apps can help foster a better body image and encourage a healthier relationship with food.

Recovery Record

Recovery Record

Recovery Record is a great app for anyone recovering from an eating disorder and wanting to develop a more positive body image. Keep a record of the meals you eat and how they make you feel using the app and complete questionnaires that’ll help you track your progress over time. One user calls Recovery Record a “remarkable recovery tool”; “It helps me stick to my meal plan, provides an outlet to vent about my food concerns and helps me stay intact with my body to work with it rather than against.”  (Free; iOS and Android)

Rise Up and Recover

Rise Up and Recover

Rise Up + Recover is a unique app as it not only allows you to track your meals and how you feel when you eat them, but you can also transcribe your progress into a PDF printout. Pull up the Rise + Recover app on your mobile when you feel the urge to binge or skip a meal, and need quick coping strategies. (Free; iOS and Android)

Lifesum

Lifesum

Unlike the other apps featured in this list, Lifesum is a broader resource for all things healthy living. The app allows you to set personal goals, from eating healthier, to building more muscle and getting in more steps each day. You can also enter your own personal data and let Lifesum generate a “Life Score” to get a personalized roadmap to better health. With reminders to drink water and eat regularly throughout the day, Lifesum is a great option for anyone trying to live healthier, but for people with eating disorders, this app can be used to help you redefine how you think about healthy body image. (Free; iOS and Android)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Apps

Who hasn’t left the house only to turn right back again because you’re worried you left the iron or the stove or the curling iron on? We’re all guilty as charged. But for someone tormented by obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), that same worry can persist all day—even after they’ve gone home to turn off their appliances. OCD, experienced by 2.2 million adults, is characterized by repetitive, unstoppable, intrusive, or obsessive thoughts and irrational urges (compulsions) to do repetitive acts to relieve the anxiety of the obsessions. The obsessions and compulsions can vary greatly. But, with a first-line treatment plan of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and/ or medication, OCD can be effectively managed. To ease the angst on the regular, the following apps identify triggers, help to navigate a bout of OCD when it strikes and provide easy ways to turn around negative thoughts.

nOCD

nocd

nOCD was designed with the help of OCD specialists and patients to incorporate two treatments: mindfulness and Exposure Response Prevention Treatment. You can receive immediate, clinically-supported guidance when an OCD episode strikes, take weekly tests to assess the severity of your OCD, and have motivational support along the way. One user calls nOCD “a free therapist in your pocket!”  (Free; iOS)

GG OCD

GG OCD App

GG OCD aims to improve OCD symptoms by increasing the user’s awareness of negative thoughts and training the brain to push those aside to embrace a more positive outset. The app takes the users through various levels, each consisting of short games around a specific theme. From how to automatically replace negative self-talk with positive thoughts, to belief in change, building self-esteem and more, this app takes its user on a journey towards a healthier thinking pattern. (Free; iOS and Android)

PTSD Coach

ptsd coach

Created by the VA’s National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), PTSD Coach offers everything from a self-assessment for PTSD, to opportunities to find support, positive self-talk, and anger management. What’s great about this app is that you can customize tools based on your own individual needs and preferences, and integrate your own contacts, photos, and music.4  (Free; iOS and Android)

Breathe2Relax

breathe2relax

Sometimes you just need to breathe and remind yourself you are okay. Breathe2Relax is made for just that. Created by the National Center for Telehealth and Technology, this app is a portable stress management tool that teaches users a skill called diaphragmatic breathing. Breathe2Relax works by decreasing the body’s ‘fight-or-flight’ stress response, making it a great option for people suffering from PTSD. (Free; iOS and Android)

Suicide Prevention Hotline 800-273-8255, and Trevor Lifeline, 866-488-7386.

Remember to take care of your mental health daily by:

  1. Get enough sleep each night. Aim for at least 9 hours. Turn off all electronics at least two hours before bedtime.
  2. Avoid sugar and highly processed foods. What you eat will affect how you feel and your mind.
  3. Select healthier snacks like almonds, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, mixed nuts, Koshi cereals, yogurt without sugar with blueberries on top, hard-boiled eggs, look for veggie snacks in chip isle, hummus, carrots, rice cakes, peanut butter, tangerines, mozzarella sticks you can peel.
  4. Eat nutritiously and focus on lots of veggies. If you don’t cook or don’t feel like it, look for microwavable ones and use sea salt. Black beans, lentil or veggies soups are filling too.
  5. Hydrate throughout the day with water. Soda, sugary drinks, power drinks, coffee will all cause jitters, anxiety and you will keep craving more –none are good for your mental health except water. If you need flavor look for sugarless flavor packets in great flavors you can add to it to spice it up.
  6. Get at least 30 minutes of exercise. When you feel stressed or anxious take a 15 minute walk break. If you can get outside in nature, even better. Nature and exercise are both scientifically proven to improve mental health. If your mind races or you feel scattered, there’s nothing better you can do to calm your mind. The key is to fully be in the moment and focus on breathing and your surroundings. Your brain takes in a tremendous amount of information each day. It needs a release. Exercise clears the slate. Your body gets to benefit too and you release natural feel-good hormones you need to feel good. Walking counts. Bonus: There isn’t one harmful side effect.
  7. Limit the amount of negative news you either watch on TV or read on social media. Make time to watch a good movie. Comedies are especially uplifting and will get you outside of your own head. Call a friend. Watch at the same time. Then, compare what you thought. People to avoid: untrustworthy, negative or quick to anger top the list. If you’re trapped with a such a person during Covid –set boundaries and limit your time near them.
  8. Journal and write your thoughts down. What are you feeling? Why? What can you do today or tomorrow to improve that?
  9. Listen to uplifting music.
  10. Make a list of every little thing you are grateful for each day. You can breathe, walk, read –things that seem trivial but if taken away would make you realize how blessed you are.
  11. Remind yourself there is no one else in the world exactly like you. No one. You’re special and beautiful.
  12. Be ask compassionate and forgiving with your own flaws and mistakes as you would be with a best friend. Think of all your mistakes as lessons. Ask yourself what you learned from them and how much wiser you will be next time. Wisdom comes from experience.
  13. Remind yourself you can’t control what other people do or say, but you can control 1) how you react to them and b) how you yourself behave. It’s better to respond than react. That means remembering to count to 10 and breathe or taking a time out as needed. If someone else is yelling, let them. It’s about them, not you. Remain calm.
  14. Give yourself a treat day each week when you can indulge in favorites, ie. pizza, ice cream or whatever. Celebrate you.

    15. Do something nice for someone. Open a door. Lend a helping hand. Ask if someone needs anything. Offer a sincere compliment. Make someone laugh. Refer a good movie or book. Refer someone for a job. Forward job opening that may be of interest to someone you know. Or simply smile. It’s wonderful being around nice people. Be one.

    Everything will be OK.