Tomorrow’s Time Change May Change Your Mood

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Tomorrow marks the end of Daylight Saving Time –when we turn clocks ‘back’ one hour.

According to Scott Bea, PsyD, of Cleveland Clinic, when it gets darker outside sooner, it can impact our likelihood of developing seasonal affective disorder, or ‘SAD.’

“”Of course we know people in Florida aren’’t going to suffer quite as much,”” says Dr. Bea. “

Research shows the rate of seasonal affective disorder down there is about 1.4 percent, but if you get up to New Hampshire, it’s about 9.7 percent. So where you exist in relation to the equator makes a difference.”

 

Dr. Bea says ‘SAD’ is marked by 3 things:

sleepiness

withdrawal

irritability

 

Research has shown that women tend to suffer from ‘SAD’ about four times as much as men do, but when men develop symptoms, they tend to be more severe.

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In addition to longer periods of darkness, the grayness of winter impacts a lot of people.

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About four percent of folks will experience ‘SAD’ during the winter, while another ten percent will get ‘winter blues.’

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Dr. Bea says light therapy works for many people. He suggests getting a light-therapy lamp, sitting in front of it for about 30 minutes every day, ideally in the morning.

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Starting light therapy as early as October and keeping it going through the spring will provide the most benefit.

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And, if nothing else, Dr. Bea says just getting outdoors more often can help too.

“”What people do is they stay indoors and so they don’t get ordinary light exposure.  One of the problems is we’’re not outside enough, even on a cloudy day, if you’re outside for thirty minutes in the morning, you’re going to get enough light exposure and that seems to make a difference.””

Dr. Bea also suggests creating social obligations – meeting up with other people or perhaps taking up an exercise program – can be beneficial for our mental health during colder months.

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Again, to keep smiling through darker, colder weather follow these tips:

  1. GET OUTDOORS, ESPECIALLY IN MORNINGS FOR AT LEAST 30 MINUTES
  2. SOCIALIZE WITH FAMILY AND FRIENDS -LAUGHTER!
  3. MAINTAIN A DAILY EXERCISE ROUTINE
  4. USE LIGHT THERAPY 30 MINUTES DAILY UNTIL SPRING

If you’ve used light therapy in the past, we’d love to hear from you.

There are several brands available on Amazon from small portable ones you can place on your desk for about $39. and ones costing up into the hundreds so if you’ve used one, please let us know if and how it worked for you!

 

Stay healthy!

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SOURCE: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4673349/

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One Woman Starts Legislation Sweeping Nation To Inform Women Of Dense Breast Tissue

 

nancycappello1In 2004, Nancy Cappello, PhD from Connecticut, was diagnosed with advanced stage breast cancer.

She was shocked as she had no prior risk factors, and normal screenings for a decade.

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“I was shocked my cancer had metastasized to 13 lymph nodes and was the size of a quarter, I asked my team of doctors, with my latest ‘normal’ mammogram report in hand, how could this happen since I just had a normal mammogram.” -Nancy

Each physician told her that her cancer was hidden by the mammogram due to her dense breast tissue.

Dense breast tissue is comprised of less fat and more connective tissue which appears white on a mammogram. Cancer also appears white thus tumors are often hidden or masked by the dense tissue.

As a woman ages, her breasts usually become more fatty. However, 2/3 of pre-menopausal and 1/4 of post menopausal women (40%) have dense breast tissue. 

Additionally, as the density of the breast increases, the risk of breast  cancer also increases.

Radiologists have been reporting a woman’s dense breast tissue to her referring doctor for twenty years.   Most often, that information is not conveyed to the patient.

Displaying heterogeneously or extremely dense breast tissue on a mammogram is considered dense (BIRADS C, D). 

Learn More

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Amy Colton, Nancy Cappello

“After an extensive search of the literature, which existed for decades before my diagnosis, I learned that 40% of women have dense breast tissue, that mammograms are limited in ‘seeing’ cancer in dense breasts and that there are other technologies, such as ultrasound or MRI that can significantly ‘see’ cancers that are invisible by mammogram.”

When Nancy asked her doctors to report dense breast tissue to women in her community, each of them refused.  

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Nancy Cappello featured in the New York Times

“My Italian heritage with our tenets of truth and justice immediately kicked in.”

 

Her doctors’ rejection led to action when in 2009, Connecticut became the first state in America to report dense breast tissue to the patient through the mammography report.

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As of today, thanks to Nancy Cappello’s unplanned advocacy, thirty-one states have a density reporting law and more are pending.

 

Nancy Cappello: One of 8 ‘chemo’ infusions 3 months before 11th NORMAL mammogram

Nancy has since been honored by UNICO at its national convention with the 2017 Americanism Award for her breast health advocacy through the work of her two non- profit organizations, Are You Dense Inc. and Are You Dense Advocacy Inc.

The Americanism award recognizes an Italian-American who has made an enduring impact on humanity which encompasses the cornerstone of UNICO’s foundation.

“When I received notice of this prestigious honor, I bowed to give thanks to my parents and my Italian ancestors, who paved the way for me to relentlessly pursue an early diagnosis for women with dense breast tissue, through the democratic process, turning an injustice to justice for women’s breast health.”

Unico National President Tom Vaughn, Nancy Cappello and her husband Joe, Francine Nido, Unico’s National Secretary

Check out the following map link to find out if your state has a law and updates:

http://www.areyoudense.org/news-events/density-reporting-bills-spread-across-country/

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For More Information on Nancy’s incredible advocacy work please visit: http://www.areyoudense.org

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So much valuable information for women on http://www.areyoudense.org

 

Thank you, Nancy!

 

UPDATE:

BREAKING HEALTH NEWS:  Senators Dianne Feinstein (CA) and Dean Heller (NV) and Representatives Rosa DeLauro (CT) and Brian Fitzpatrick (PA) introduce a national bill requiring physicians to notify patients whether or not they have dense breast tissue.

On Twitter: Representative Mike Rohrkaste  and Senator Alberto Darling  introduce bill in Wisconsin to prompt patient notification if they have dense breasts, which increases cancer risk.

#NotifyMeNow

Helping Kids Cope After A Tragedy

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By Dr. Robin F. Goodman

With the horrific tragedy in Las Vegas, a 24 hour news cycle, and wide access to social media kids are more on top of current events more than ever before. Parents have a tough job when scary things are in the news. But there are some general guidelines to keep in mind when tackling such topics. Below are some brief tips:

 

·        Be honest.

·        Be age appropriate.

·        Be attentive and listen to their specific worries.

·        Be aware and review your own family safety plans

·        Be careful managing your own fears.

·        Be comforting and focused on the here and now.

 

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We have all been struck by the tragic events in the news and offer the following suggestions to the adults who will guide their children.

Talk to your children: Start with a general statement or question then listen to what they say or ask. Look for opportunities to check in more than once.

Be honest: Use age appropriate language, share basic information, and correct misinformation. It’s OK to say “I don’t know” and focus on what you do know.

Reassure: Using routine and structure to reassure children they will be all right, you are all right, and things in their world will continue. Remind them of the people that take care of them and how to get help.

Return to the familiar: Getting back to familiar tasks and distracting or even fun activities provides balance and perspective.

Use media sense: Turn off or limit TV viewing especially for little ones. Monitor what news and social media children and teens are watching or using.

Model coping: Adults have feelings and can help children by modeling appropriate ones and especially how to cope with upset or sadness in healthy ways.

Encourage expression: Children may more easily express their thoughts and feelings in pictures, music, play and poems. Be careful not to press for details but rather validate how they feel and problem solve ways to feel better.

Stay connected: Being connected to others – friends, family, a faith community – can be especially healing and powerful when feeling upset, overwhelmed and alone.

Provide comfort: Hugs – given and received – help everyone, young and old.

Find the good: Look for stories of hope. Cope with kindness. When able, be the hope – reach out a hand, offer help, care for others day to day.

 

Dr. Goodman, a licensed clinical psychologist and art therapist, with particular expertise in trauma and bereavement, was clinical director of the New York City Children’s Grief Connection. She has published, taught and lectured in the United States and abroad. Her credits include more than 100 online articles and five books.

Her Caring for Kids after Trauma and Death: A Guide for Parents and Professionals, was used throughout the country following 9/11 and the war with Iraq. She was a clinical associate professor of psychology at NYU School of Medicine, and while at the NYU Child Study Center was Director of Bereavement Programs and co-directed a research and clinical program for children bereaved after 9/11. She has been a frequent on-air contributor to national and local media.

She can be reached at (917) 757-1286

For More Information visit:

https://www.acaringhand.org/single-post/2012/12/16/Helping-Children-After-Tragedy

 

Talking to Kids About Tragic News Events

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After any disaster, parents and other adults struggle with what they should say and share with children and what not to say or share with them.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) encourages parents, teachers, child care providers, and others who work closely with children to filter information about the crisis and present it in a way that their child can accommodate, adjust to, and cope with.

Where to Start – All Ages

No matter what age or developmental stage the child is, parents can start by asking a child what they’ve already heard. Most children will have heard something, no matter how old they are. After you ask them what they’ve heard, ask what questions they have.

Older children, teens, and young adults might ask more questions and may request and benefit more from additional information. But no matter what age the child is, it’s best to keep the dialogue straightforward and direct.

Avoiding Graphic Details & Exposure to Media

In general, it is best to share basic information with children, not graphic details, or unnecessary details about tragic circumstances. Children and adults alike want to be able to understand enough so they know what’s going on. Graphic information and images should be avoided.

Keep young children away from repetitive graphic images and sounds that may appear on television, radio, social media, computers, etc.

With older children, if you do want them to watch the news, record it ahead of time. That allows you to preview it and evaluate its contents before you sit down with them to watch it. Then, as you watch it with them, you can stop, pause, and have a discussion when you need to.

Children will generally follow good advice, but you have to give them some latitude to make decisions about what they’re ready for. You can block them from seeing the newspaper that comes to the door, for example, but not the one on the newsstand. Today, most older children will have access to the news and graphic images through social media and other applications right from their cell phone. You need to be aware of what’s out there and take steps in advance to talk to children about what they might hear or see.

Talking to Very Young Children

The reality is that even children as young as 4 years old will hear about major crisis events. It’s best that they hear about it from a parent or caregiver, as opposed to another child or in the media.

Even the youngest child needs accurate information, but you don’t want to be too vague. Simply saying, “Something happened in a faraway town and some people got hurt,” doesn’t tell the child enough about what happened. The child may not understand why this is so different from people getting hurt every day and why so much is being said about it. The underlying message for a parent to convey is, “It’s okay if these things bother you. We are here to support each other.”

Talking to Gradeschool Children & Teens

After asking your child what they have heard and if they have questions about what occurred during a school shooting, community bombing, natural disaster, or even a disaster in an international country, a parent can say something such as:

“Yes. In [city], [state]” (and here you might need to give some context, depending on whether it’s nearby or far away, for example, ‘That’s a city/state that’s pretty far from/close to here’), there was disaster and many people were hurt. The police and the government are doing their jobs so they can try to make sure that it doesn’t happen again.”

A parent can follow-up as needed based on the child’s reactions and questions.

Talking to Children with Developmental Delays or Disabilities

Parents who have a child with a developmental delay or disability should gear their responses to their child’s developmental level or abilities, rather than their physical, age. If you have a teenage child whose level of intellectual functioning is more similar to a 7-year-old, for instance, gear your response toward her developmental level. Start by giving less information. Provide details or information in the most appropriate and clear way you can.

Talking to Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

What’s helpful to a child with an ASD may be different. For instance, the child may find less comfort in cuddling than some other children. Parents should try something else that does calm and comfort their child on other occasions. Ask yourself, “Given who my child is, his personality, temperament, and developmental abilities, what might work for him?”

Signs a Child Might Not Be Coping Well

If children don’t have a chance to practice healthy coping, a parent may see signs that they’re having difficulty adjusting. Some of things to look for are:

  • Sleep problems: Watch for trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, difficulty waking, nightmares, or other sleep disturbances.
  • Physical complaints: Children may complain of feeling tired, having a headache, or generally feeling unwell. You may notice your child eating too much or less than usual.
  • Changes in behavior: Look for signs of regressive behavior, including social regression, acting more immature, or becoming less patient and more demanding. A child who once separated easily from her parents may become clingy. Teens may begin or change current patterns of tobacco, alcohol, or substance use.
  • Emotional problems: Children may experience undue sadness, depression, anxiety, or fears.

Sometimes it can be hard to tell if a child is reacting in a typical way to an unusual event or whether they are having real problems coping, and might need extra support. If you are concerned, talk to your child’s pediatrician or a mental health professional or counselor.

Don’t wait for the signs. Start the discussion early, and keep the dialogue going.

Additional Information on HealthyChildren.org:

​​Additional Resources:

Prevent Illness After Floods

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When returning to your home after a flooding emergency, be aware flood water may contain sewage. We’ve learned a lot from past floods. Please stay informed and healthy.

 

Health Risks and Hazards Caused by Floods by Naoki Minamiguchi

Introduction

A flood can devastate homes, commercial buildings, agricultural and pastoral lands, public goods, and other physical properties. However, during the flood and its aftermath, there are also threats to one’s health and safety.

In the flood occurred in Bangladesh in 1988, diarrhea was found to be most common illness and a major cause of death amongst the population affected by the flood that helped spread the disease (Siddique, et al 1991).

Prevalent respiratory infection induced by the flood was also blamed for the high morbidity and death toll – 46,740 patients and 154 deaths – in the devastated areas.

In developing regions of the world, acute sanitation problems and various water-borne diseases – such as diarrhea, dysentery, cholera and typhoid – threaten disaster affected populations, especially the poor and vulnerable, due to lack of access to safe drinking water, medicine and hygienic food.

While infection risks may be low in industrialized countries (Public Health Laboratory Service 2000), floodwater is generally contaminated by various pollutants: sewage, human and animal feces, pesticides and insecticides, fertilizers, oil, asbestos, rusting building materials, and so forth.

This was evidenced by the health and environmental tests carried out on the floodwaters in New Orleans where the unprecedented flooding and destruction was caused by Hurricane Katrina – one of the worst natural disasters ever occurred in the United States – and hundreds of thousands of residents lost homes and were displaced in temporary shelters.

The tests revealed a clear signal of bacteria and lead hazards to human health and warned the public to avoid exposure to the contaminated water accordingly (Gerencher 2005).

Sources of Health Risks and Hazards

Although the public attention is normally paid to the risk of physical property destruction caused by floods, it is strongly suggested that each of us remembers and practices some basic precautions to prevent possible diseases and injuries during and after flooding and to maintain good health during the repercussion of floods.

Amongst others, the following health risks and hazards are the common health threats.

Unsafe food

Floodwaters contain disease causing bacteria, dirt, oil, human and animal wastes, and farm and industrial chemicals.

They carry away whatever existing on the ground and upstream.

Their contact with food items including foodcrops in agricultural lands during flooding can make that food unsafe to eat and hazardous to human health.

Power failures caused by floods also damage stored food.

Refrigerated and frozen foods are affected during the outage periods, and thus must be carefully monitored and examined prior to consumption.

Foods kept inside cardboards, plastic bags, jars, bottles, and paper packaging are equally subject to disposal if contaminated by floodwaters.

Even though the packages do not appear to be wet, they may be unhygienic with mold contamination and deteriorate rapidly. (CDC Fact Sheets 10 September 2004 and 2 September 2005; Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services 2005; NDSU various years)

Contaminated drinking and washing water and poor sanitation

 

Flooding impairs clean water sources with pollutants and devastates sanitary toilets.

Direct and indirect contact with the contaminants – whether through direct food intakes, vector insects such as flies, unclean hands, or dirty plates and utensils – result in waterborne illnesses and life- threatening infection diseases.

The pollutants also saturate into the ground water and/or can infiltrate into sanitary sewer lines through the ground. In addition, wastewater treatment plants, if flooded and malfunctioned, can be overloaded with polluted runoff waters and sewage beyond their disposal capacity, resulting into backflows of raw sewage to homes and low lying grounds.

Private wells can be also contaminated or damaged severely by floodwaters, while private sewage disposal systems also become a cause of infection and illnesses when they are broken or overflowed (CDC Fact Sheets 10 September 2004 and 10 September 2005).

In this manner, unclean drinking and washing water and sanitation, coupled with lack of adequate sewage treatment, can lead to disease outbreaks, e.g. life-threatening cholera, typhoid, dysentery and some forms of hepatitis as experienced in the floods in Bangladesh and New Orleans.

Indeed, many lives were claimed by the infectious diseases broken out during and after the wave surges of the Indian Ocean Tsunamis and resultant floods that devastated regions along the coasts in Southeast and South Asian countries (Government of Western Australia; Indonesia Relief 2005; Rose 2005; WHO).

The key to preventing a health catastrophe is therefore a basic hygiene: i.e. clean and safe water and toilets.

Mosquitoes and animals

Prolonged rainfall and floods provide new breeding grounds – wet areas and stagnant pools – for mosquitoes and can lead to an increase in the number of mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue and West Nile fevers (Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services 2005).

It is also suggested to avoid contact with wild animals, rats and rodents that possibly carry viruses and diseases, and to get rid of dead animals in accordance with official guidelines issued by local animal control authorities if any (CDC Fact Sheet 10 September 2004).

Leptospirosis, or Weil’s disease – a zoonotic bacterial disease associated predominantly with rats – often accompanies floods in developing countries (Leptospirosis Information Center).

The leptospirosis risk is however very low in the industrialized regions unless any cuts or wounds have direct contact with the disease contaminated floodwaters or animals.

Molds and mildews

Excessive exposure to molds and mildews can cause flood victims – especially those with allergies and asthma – to contract upper respiratory diseases and to trigger cold-like symptoms, e.g. sore throat, watery eyes, wheezing and dizziness (CDC 2006; FEMA 2005; North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services).

Molds grow in as short a period as 24 to 48 hours in wet and damp areas of the buildings and homes that have not been cleaned after flooding such as water infiltrated walls, floors, carpets, toilets and bathrooms.

Although molds exist naturally as well as in our normal life, very small mold’s spores can be easily inhaled by human bodies and cause allergic reactions, asthma episodes, and other respiratory problems if a large amount of molds are inbreathed.

Amongst others, infants, children, elderly people, and pregnant women are considered most vulnerable to mold induced health problems.

Carbon monoxide poisoning

Post-flood carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is reported to be a growing problem in many developed countries. CO can be found in combustion fumes, e.g. fumes generated by small gasoline engines, stoves, generators, lanterns, and gas ranges, or by burning charcoals and woods.

In the event of power outages following floods, the flood victims tend to use alternative sources of fuels or electricity for heating, cooling, or cooking inside enclosed or partly enclosed houses, garages or buildings without an adequte level of air ventilation (Environmental Health Center

2001).

CO builds up from these sources and poisons the people and animals inside. CO poisoning therefore should be regarded as a potential hazard after major floods.

Other hazards when reentering and cleaning flooded homes and buildings

Besides the flood related health problems described above, flooded homes and buildings can pose other significant health hazards and risks after floodwaters recede.

First of all, electrical power systems including fallen power lines can become hazardous during cleanup activities (CDC Fact Sheets 11 September 2004 and 29 August 2005).

One should avoid turning on or off the main power while standing in the remaining floodwater.

Gas leaks that may be occurring from pipelines or propane tanks can trigger another disastrous outcome – e.g. fire and explosion – when entering and cleaning damaged buildings as well as endeavoring to restore utilities services (CDC Fact Sheets 10 September 2004 and 27 October 2004).

Flood debris – such as broken bottles, woods, stones and walls – may also cause fresh wounds and injuries when removing contaminated mud and cleaning damaged buildings.

Extreme caution must be used with possible chemical hazards during flood recovery.

Containers of hazardous chemicals including pesticides, insecticides, fertilizers, car batteries, propane tanks, and other industrial chemicals may be hidden or buried under flood debris (CDC Fact Sheets 10 September 2004 and 6 April 2005).

Lastly, a health hazard can also occur when hazardous dusts and molds remaining in the ducts, fans and ventilators of air-conditioning and heating equipment are circulated throughout the building and inhaled by those engaged in cleanup and restoration unless it is properly cleaned after flooding (North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services).

Mental stress and fatigue

A flood can cause both emotional and physical stress. However, various reports attribute a major health hazard of floods to mental stress or psychological distress due to exposure to extreme disaster events (NDSU various years).

Having experienced a devastating flood, seen loved ones lost or injured, and homes damaged or destroyed, flooding poses a long-term psychological impact on the flood victims. In addition, the cost and labor required to repair flood-damaged homes places severe financial and psychological burdens on the people affected, in particular the unprepared and uninsured. Post-flood recovery – especially when it becomes prolonged – can commonly cause mental disorders, anxiety, anger, depression, lethargy, hyperactivity, sleeplessness, and in an extreme case, suicides amongst the flood victims.

Behavior changes may also occur in children such as an increase in bed-wetting and aggression. There is also a long- term concern amongst the affected that their homes would be flooded again in the future. Dr Noji argues that many reported morbidity problems caused by disasters including hypertension and cardiovascular disease – and even leukemia and lymphoma – may be stress-related (Noji 1997).

While more attention is usually paid to the cleanups and repairs of the damaged buildings and properties during the aftermath, it is also required for individual victims to look after him/herself and his/her family, and when appropriate to obtain proper emotional support from local authorities, relief agencies, psychological counselors, mentors, friends, relatives, etc.

Conclusions

Restoring flooded homes, buildings and properties is an overwhelming task both physically and emotionally. It is often not easy for the depressed flood victims to even identify where to start while avoiding potential health risks and hazards of devastating flooding.

A number of guidelines and detailed instructions for restoration have been already issued by local governments, health centers, research institutions, and international organizations involved with disaster relief and assistance in order to protect the flood victims and rescue and restoration workers from various health threats discussed in this report.

Flood Protection Handbook of the Boulder County, for instance, contains invaluable information on concrete actions to be taken before, during and after

a flood (Boulder County 2002).

All governmental bodies or public entities are strongly encouraged to follow suite if they have not implemented a similar course of actions.

They are also expected to address the health risks and hazards in national, regional and community flood management plans and programmes and to make appropriate effort to raise public awareness of such risks and hazards.

References

  • –  Boulder County (2002) Flood Protection Handbook. Boulder, Colorado
  • –  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2004) Key Facts about Flood Recovery. Fact Sheet 10September 2004. Atlanta. CDC
  • –  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2004) Reentering Your Flooded Home. Fact Sheet 27 October 2004. Atlanta. CDC
  • –  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2004) What You Need to Know When the Power Goes Out Unexpectedly. Fact Sheet 11 September 2004. Atlanta. CDC
  • –  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2005) After a Flood. Fact Sheet 6 April 2005. Atlanta. CDC
  • –  Detroit Health Department, et al. (2004) Imminent Health Hazard Emergency Response Reference forRegulators
  • –  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2005) Disinfecting Wells Following an Emergency. FactSheet 10 September 2005. Atlanta. CDC
  • –  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2005) How to Protect Yourself and Others from ElectricalHazards Following a Natural Disaster. Fact Sheet 29 August 2005. Atlanta. CDC
  • –  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2005) Keep Food and Water Safe After a Natural Disasteror Power Outage. Fact Sheet 2 September 2005. Atlanta. CDC
  • –  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2006) Health Concerns Associated with Mold in Water- Damaged Homes After Hurricannes Katrina and Rita — New Orleans Area, Louisiana, October 2005. Morbidity and Mortarity Weekly Report 55(02); 41-44. 20 January 2006
  • –  Environmental Health Center (2001) Air Quality Problems Caused by Floods (http://www.nsc.org/ehc/indoor/floods.htm) Washington DC. National Safety Council
  • –  Federal Emergency Management Agency (2005) Storm Drenching May Foster Mold Growth and Become a Health Hazard. Release Number: 1612-014. 30 November 2005. Atlanta. FEMA
  • –  Government of Western Australia. Asia Tsunami (http://www.health.wa.gov.au/tsunami/professionals.cfm)
  • –  Indonesia Relief (2005) Rebuilding After the Tsunamis: Addressing Infectious Diseases in Indonesia. 12

April 2005 (http://www.indonesia- relief.org/mod.php?mod=publisher&op=viewarticle&cid=27&artid=654)

http://www.newsweek.com/hurricane-harvey-infectious-diseases-flood-water-bacteria-viruses-656093– Ross, E. (2005) No Major Disease Outbreaks Yet, But Health Officials Say Clean Water and Sanitation are Key to Preventing Life-threatening Cholera, Typhoid and Dysentery. AP Worldstream. Jakarta (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi- bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2005/01/01/international1508EST0500.DTL)

  • –  Siddique, A.K., et al (1991) 1988 Floods in Bangladesh: Pattern of Illness and Causes of Death. Journal of Diarrhoeal Diseases Research 1991 December; 9(4): 310-4.
  • –  Noji, E (1997) The Public Health Consequences of Disasters. New York. Oxford University Press–World Health Organization. Three Months after the Indian Ocean Earthquake-Tsunami. (http://www.who.int/hac/crises/international/asia_tsunami/3months/report/en/index.html

From Washington State Labor & Industry:

10 Most likely Hazards After a Flood

  1. Electrical and Gas Hazards
  • Take caution and treat all electrical lines, wires, equipment and fixtures as if they are energized until proven otherwise.
  • Immediately evacuate buildings if a gas leak or odor is detected, and notify the site supervisor or competent person.
  1. Motor Vehicles
  • Monitor local road conditions and obey closure signs. Don’t drive though flowing water. Six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle and two feet of water will carry most cars away.
  • Standing water may not carry you away, but you may not be able to tell how deep it is. Unless you know how deep it is, it’s best to not drive through standing water.
  • Be aware of seen and unseen road hazards such as building debris, tree limbs, and pot holes. Also floods bring mud and roads can become very slick.
  1. Respiratory Hazards
  • Gasoline, propane and diesel-powered equipment (such as portable generators, power washers, compressors and pumps) should only be operated in well-ventilated outdoor areas to prevent the buildup of carbon monoxide gas.
  • Stay upwind of or away from dust-generating activities, in particular involving crystalline silica-containing materials like concrete, brick, tile, drywall, mortar, sand, or stone.
  • Identify building materials such as painted surfaces and pipes that may contain lead.
  • If an area is known or suspected to contain asbestos, ensure that an assessment has been done by a competent individual before entering the area; if asbestos is present, wait until it is removed or contained.
  • Notify the supervisor immediately if asbestos is identified at the site and stop work until it has been removed or contained.
  • Refrain from entering areas with extensive mold buildup.
  1. Chemical Use/Exposure
  • Be aware of your surroundings. If there is evidence (sight or smell) of chemicals or their use, avoid that area and request an Industrial Hygienist accompany you.
  1. Sharp, jagged debris
  • Tree limbs.
  • Construction or demolition debris.
  • Broken glass.
  • Animal bites, both stray pets and wild animals.
  1. Roofing and Working from Heights
  • Ensure the use of fall protection systems: guardrails, safety nets or fall arrest systems.
  • Identify areas of structural weakness.
  • Identify ladder hazards and ensure their safe use.
  1. Power Tools
  • Ensure guarding on power tools is in good working order and always used.

 

  • Inspect all extension cords, remove from service those that are damaged, cut or have exposed wiring and inner insulation.

 

  • Use ground-fault circuit interrupters (GFCI) or double-insulated power tools that are approved by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory.
  1. Flood Waters (Drowning/Walking)
  • Same as with driving, six inches of moving water may cause you to lose your footing and two feet of water will carry you away. Stay out of moving water.

 

  • Even standing water can present similar hazards. The water most likely will not be clear; therefore you won’t see how deep even a small puddle is. Avoid walking in standing water unless you know it is safe to do so.

 

  • Be aware of seen and unseen hazards such as building debris, tree limbs, and pot holes. Also floods bring mud and walkways can become very slick.
  1. Noise
  • Ensure the use of hearing protection when noise levels exceed 85 decibels. Generally, if you cannot hold a normal conversation at arm’s length due to noise, then hearing protection should be worn.
  1.  Personal Decontamination
  • Always wash hands with soap and water before eating, drinking, smoking, applying lip balm or cosmetics to prevent contamination of the mouth, nose or eyes with hazardous materials or infectious agents. Use a waterless alcohol-based hand cleaner if water is not available.

 

  • Decontaminate raingear and rubber boots that have been exposed to potentially hazardous materials.

 

 

For more information on how to protect yourself and your family, visit CDC’s Flood Water After a Disaster or Emergency.

 

Health Benefits of Spinning and How To Do It Right

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spin13These Spin tips will keep you sweating, smiling and secure knowing you’re doing it right.

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First, here’s a little history on how Spinning was first created. Back in the ’90’s medical anchor, Ileana Bravo and I interviewed the founder of something people in Miami were talking about called “Spinning.”  We produced a health segment for NBC Miami and interviewed the Founder of it.  His name was Johnny G.

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The TODAY SHOW picked up the Miami story and spinning spun off nationwide. Johnny G. wanted other people to be able to reach their champion within from anywhere the same way he desired to after being sidelined in a car accident.

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The founder, Johnny G’s full name is Johnny Goldberg. He was a champion endurance bicycle racer. His passion to create a different type of indoor bike was ignited after he was hit by a car while training on his bike outdoors at night.

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Following that accident, Johnny G. spent ten years developing the right type of indoor cycle that would feel like his real road bike.

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The Spinner® bike officially launched in NYC in 1993 and was offered at Crunch Gyms.

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Here’s what it looks like.

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Spinning is still hotter than ever because of all of the above and more.

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Print

Now you know why it’s so popular with men and women. Here’s how to do it right.

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Proper set-up and form helps you avoid injury and maximize all those health perks.

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Everyone can benefit from a few expert tips. Numero Uno:  Warm up.

Best Warm Up Moves Before a Spinning Bike Class

by Brian Willett

Warm-up moves can help you burn more calories, reduce risk of injury, and improve your performance on the bike. Of course, certain warm-up moves will be more effective than others, so choosing well is important.

Quadriceps Moves

Your quadriceps — the large group of four muscles on the front of your thighs — drives the motion of spinning workouts, providing power to move the pedals. You can get your quadriceps ready for spinning with body-weight squats, light pedaling and the standing quadriceps stretch. To perform that stretch, stand with one hand leaning on a wall for support, and the other hand holding your foot to your buttocks so you are standing on one leg. Be sure to flex your knee completely when performing the standing quadriceps stretch to ensure you are fully stretching the muscle.

Hamstrings Moves

Your hamstrings are located on the back of your upper leg, and like the quadriceps, they are involved in every pedal stroke when spinning. An easy way to get your hamstrings ready for spinning is to bend over and touch your toes. You can also sit down and perform a sit-and-reach motion. According to a study from the February 2005 edition of the “Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research,” performing static stretches rather than dynamic moves is preferable for improving flexibility.

Back Moves

Your back muscles have to work hard to maintain proper posterior chain alignment and prevent you from slouching over when you ride. Thus, it’s important that you warm up your back muscles to prepare them for that work. You can stretch your back muscles in several ways, such as by lying on your back and pulling your knees to your chest, or doing the cat-cow stretch.

Shoulder Moves

Although your shoulders don’t push the pedals, they do help support your upper body while you ride and assist in steering. Moves such as jumping jacks, arm circles, and extending your arms behind your back as far as you can will help you get your shoulders loose and ready for your spinning class.

Calf Moves

The muscles of your calves are small, but they can produce a lot of power when cycling. Both squats and jumping jacks can help warm up your calves, but you may also wish to perform calf stretches while leaning against a wall. To do so, put both hands on a wall and lean into the wall, with one leg bent at the knee and one extended fully back.

 

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Now that you’re warmed up, I spoke with expert Spin Instructor, Julie Insogna.

Now that you’re warmed up, I spoke with Spin Instructor, Julie Insogna about your next move:

QUESTION:

FIRST, TELL US WHEN AND WHY YOU GOT INTERESTED IN SPINNING?

JULIE INSOGNA:

QUESTION:

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF SPINNING?

JULIE INSOGNA:

QUESTION:

WHAT’S THE FIRST THING SOMEONE SHOULD DO WHEN ENTERING A SPIN CLASS?

JULIE INSOGNA:

QUESTION:

WHAT’S THE SECOND THING THEY NEED TO DO?

JULIE INSOGNA:

QUESTION:

THIRD?
JULIE INSOGNA:

QUESTION:

ANYTHING ELSE SPINNERS NEED TO KNOW?

JULIE INSOGNA:

QUESTION:

WHERE CAN PEOPLE TAKE YOUR CLASS OR FIND OUT MORE ABOUT IT?

 

Thanks, Julie!  

More Great Spin Tips by Deb Cheslow:

What to Wear in Spin Class

spin3When you first start spin, you might want to wear padded cycle shorts as the saddle takes some getting used to.

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Most spin classes have bikes with pedals that accommodate people in sneakers in addition to one or two types of cycle clips that attach to cycling shoes.

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When we first started spin, we wore sneakers for a couple months before making the commitment to buy the shoes. In hindsight, we would have purchased those “spin shoes” much sooner, as you have so much more leverage and less wiggling when you’re clipped into the spin pedals. It also puts much less stress on your shins and toes!

How to Set Up Your Bike

Spin class bikes are not beach cruisers. You don’t want your knees crumpled; you don’t even want them at a 90-degree angle.

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You want your knees to be slightly extended but not so much that you can’t put full pressure on the down stroke of your pedal.

 

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Most spin enthusiasts also bring their bike handles up higher than they would a road or mountain bike to accommodate running out of the saddle (we’ll get to this in a minute).

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And, make sure that you’re not reaching dramatically to those handlebars when you’re seated on the bike.

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Everything is adjustable and this is where it’s most important that your spin instructor get you dialed in.

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Spin is All About Tension and Tempo

Your spin instructor expects you to keep tempo with the song so that everyone in the class is on the correct “leg” for certain activities.

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Tension knobs on the bike will take you from no tension to “drag” (where you begin to feel tension or “the road” as they call it) and subsequent turns up from there make the ride increasingly “steep.”

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While no beginner in spin class is expected to keep high tempo AND tension like the advanced riders are accustomed to, you want to work your way into higher tension as it burns more fat and enhances your cardio workout.

Initially, though, just focus on the tempo, right, left, right left, right left, march!

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About Jogging, Sprinting and Running Out of the Saddle in Spin Class

 

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Spin usually requires seated climbs and runs as well as “running out of the saddle” where you’re actually jogging or sprinting while standing above the saddle of the bike.

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For beginners, the runs out of the saddle can be too demanding.

DON’T LET PEER PRESSURE CONVINCE YOU TO RUN WHEN YOU’RE NOT READY TO.

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Most spin enthusiasts have been doing this a long time, BUT they started right where you are starting. When you try to run out of the saddle at the same amount of time or distance these “regulars” are accustomed to, you can hurt yourself.

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Swallow your pride and stay in the saddle, keeping tempo and increasing your tension slightly until you feel you can take on a jog initially for a few given seconds. Build up from there!

When you begin to run out of the saddle, do NOT lean your body weight (or your elbows!) on your handlebars.

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This puts too much torque on your knees and can damage them. Rest your hands lightly on the handlebars and focus on sitting back, above the saddle, so the strong leg muscles of your quads and hamstrings are doing the work.

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Your spin class instructor will take you on intermittent (and imaginary, of course) hills, downhills and road runs.

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At times, he or she will ask you to do intervals where you sit in the saddle for a number of counts, then run above the saddle for the same number of counts – and sometimes, these counts can be just 2 or 4!

Remember the rules during intervals (or “jumps”) – if you’re not ready, sit your butt down and just keep pedaling.

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If you are ready, try a few, making sure you don’t lean on the handlebars.

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About “Hill Climbing” in Spin Class

Sitting on the saddle and pedaling in spin class does not necessarily mean you’re resting or “recovering.”

In fact, riding “in the saddle” with solid tension will burn more calories than sprinting.

 

A good spin instructor will methodically increase tension as you ride in the saddle, effectively making you feel like you’re pedaling up an increasingly steep hill.

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In these situations, you want to protect your knees once again by sitting as far back on the saddle as you can.

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By doing so, you’re  taking the pressure of the climb off your knees and re-depositing it where it belongs – in the strong muscles of your rear end. (And last time we checked, most people didn’t need to do much toning of their knee caps.)

Beware These Spin Instructor Indiscretions …

If your spin class instructor suddenly changes counts or actions, consider that a red flag – your instructor should give you full and fair warning in advance as to what’s coming up at least a few counts down the road.

As an example, we have a great (certified) spin instructor who’s been teaching for years. As one song ends and the other begins, he might say, “This is an interval run in the saddle and out of the saddle with 30 seconds up, and 30 seconds’ recovery in between.”

Then, as the song plays, he will be adding comments such as, “Next round is just 20 seconds up, same recovery.”  It’s enough to keep you informed and keep you hanging on knowing that the NEXT song will be a completely different action!

Some spin instructors will also make the error of doing extreme activities for too long. (Personally, we think this is an ego thing where they’re more concerned with looking better than the rest of the class riders than actually guiding the riders and watching the riders for signs of fatigue.)

As an example, we’ve been in classes with spin instructors who sprint (at least double-time to the beat of the song) out of the saddle for the entirety of the song. If it’s a short song around 2 minutes, and if the spin instructor offers optional breaks to sit down during the course of the song, that’s OK.

If, however, they insist on everyone in the class sprinting for a long duration, even the most advanced riders will have difficulty maintaining proper form.

In other cases, you might see a spin instructor insist on short intervals with 2 beats in the saddle and 2 beats above the saddle for several minutes at a time. An extended session of “jumps” can cause any rider to break good form, thus putting the knees at risk.

Again, if it begins to feel too much for you or a particular session of activity (jumps or sprints or hill climbing) is forcing you out of maintaining correct posture and form, SIT DOWN!

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Then, as you try different classes with different instructors, you will begin to see which instructors are actually the best teachers. Even as they push you and do advanced work, they are still watching their riders to ensure safety and fun.

This brings another point to mind: Only take spin classes where the instructor is situated to watch the riders during the class. He or she will either be riding with the group and facing a mirror, or the spin instructor can position the bike to face the riders. It’s important that the gym provide this aspect in the spin class.

Music Can Be Key

Every spin instructor has a different style and collection of music. If you don’t like the style or can’t stand the music, move on. Because spin is built on the tempo of the songs, when you like what you’re hearing, you’re better able to keep the pace.

When you’re in a spin class with an instructor you enjoy and music that’s more to your liking, you’ll find the hour zips by. (Honest!)

Stick With It!

When you’re a beginner, try not to quit and leave the spin class (though no one will call you names if you do). Just sit down in the saddle, take the tension down, and continue to peddle through the end of the class if you can.

You’ll be prouder of yourself for enduring, and you can push yourself in the next class to stay up and in the class activity another few moments. Give yourself permission to build into this activity and you’ll find that you enjoy it more each time.

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I also spoke with an expert from the Cleveland Clinic about spinning’s health benefits.

 

Don’t forget to bring water to spin class. There’s a holder for it on bike.

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Recommended Links:  

“7 THINGS YOU’RE DOING WRONG IN SPIN CLASS”
https://www.wellandgood.com/good-sweat/7-things-youre-doing-wrong-in-spin-class-and-how-to-fix-them/

 

Johnny G. himself has an instruction video and  Spinning Instructor Certification info at:
http://spinning.com/johnny-g-live/

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Thanks Johnny G. for keeping us sweating and smiling.

 

You can find a variety of Spin Shoes & Shorts on Amazon at:
https://www.amazon.com

 

Now you know why…

 

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And why you should too!

One thing I forgot to mention is you will absolutely loathe your first spinning class. It will be hard. You will ache. You may walk out of a class early. You might exclaim, “Never again!” But, as with anything worthwhile, if you commit to it, the rewards are worth it.

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Your physical and mental endurance will keep getting stronger as you look back on that first day and laugh in disbelief because classes go real fast for you now.

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“Unleash the champion within.” ~Johnny G

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blog contact:  maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

BE SURE TO TUNE IN TO GOOD MORNING AMERICA NEXT WEDNESDAY WHEN THE ARTIST OF MY FAVORITE SPINNING SONG RIGHT NOW WILL PERFORM: . LIVE. Only on 💃

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Study: Teens Teased About Weight More Likely To Become Obese Adults

If you think teasing your teen about their weight is helping them, think again. You may be doing more harm.  Harm that can last well into their adulthood having them turn to more food for comfort.

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Being a teen can be a challenging time for many children and for teens who are overweight or obese, the challenges can be even greater.

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A recent study shows that teens who are teased about their weight are more likely to become obese adults.

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Researchers asked nearly 2,000 school aged children about whether they had been teased by other children, or family members, about their weight.

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When they followed up with these children 15 years later, they found that those who answered ‘yes’ were more likely to be obese adults, struggle with body image and develop unhealthy eating behaviors.

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Leslie Heinberg, PhD, of Cleveland Clinic did not take part in the study, but says the results are a good indication that problems with weight-based teasing need to be addressed early on.

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“”One of the primary ways people cope with this bad experience is by eating – they fall back into comfort eating; they fall into disordered eating behaviors,”” says Dr. Heinberg. “

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“What this study shows, is some of the dieting behavior they utilize can be really unhealthy,”” says Dr. Heinberg.

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Dr. Heinberg says one of the most interesting findings was that girls who were teased about their weight by family members, rather than peers, had the most problems as adults dealing with weight control and emotional distress.

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“”Peers or family members, they might tease, or give somebody a hard time about their weight – maybe not with malicious intent – maybe they think, ‘oh, this will be good. It will motivate them to lose weight, it will motivate them to eat in a healthy manner,’ however, it’s actually more likely to derail them,”” says Dr. Heinberg.

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Dr. Heinberg says home needs to be a place where children feel safe from teasing.

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“The first goal is to make home a healthy and safe environment in which teens aren’’t feeling victimized about their weight, and giving them at least a safe spot at home where they don’’t have those experiences,” she says.

NATIONAL LAMPOON'S VACATION, Anthony Michael Hall, Chevy Chase, Beverly D'Angelo, Dana Barron, 1983

For parents who are concerned about their teen’s weight, Dr. Heinberg says it’s best to bring in a professional.

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She recommends having a conversation with the child’s pediatrician before they’re seen.

Doctor Giuseppe Morino measures Mirco Conti, a ten-year-old boy, at the "Bambin Gesu" paediatric hospital in Rome

They can tell you what a healthy weight is and develop appropriate strategies for addressing it.

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OBESITY MAY BE PREVENTED BY:

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

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GOOD NUTRITION
(AVOID SODA, FAST FOOD, PROCESSED FOODS AND JUNK FOOD)

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Teen Nutrition Meal Ideas at: http://www.stack.com/a/teenage-meal-plan

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LESS SCREEN TIME

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MORE SLEEP

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Stay healthy!

maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

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SOURCE: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743517301433

MEDIA:

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How To Keep Kids Fit Brooklyn Style

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When I was a kid all we needed to stay fit is a stoop and a ball.

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Lucky for us we had a few more things, like a rope to play tug-of-war.

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And touch football in the streets was popular.

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And we loved jumping rope.

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Or playing with hula hoops.

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Girls also played softball & boys were in little leagues. My team was The Monkeys. What?

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We all held hands & sang Ring Around the Rosy and London Bridge Is Falling Down.

Children playing in the park

And there was the horse shoe toss game.

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In gym class one kid spotted another one for sit-ups.

Kids doing sit ups

And we did jumping jacks.  Not in boots.  Must have forgotten gym clothes. Happens.

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Another after school favorite activity –rollerskating.

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We didn’t even wear helmets.  And our skates looked more like this.

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We played basketball in the streets.  Darn cars got in our way. We’d make them wait.

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We also loved stickball.  We usually fashioned one out of an old broom.

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We jumped over fire hydrants. Sometimes, all them on the block. One. After. Another.

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And used chalk for hop scotch and other creative games that kept us moving.

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Somebody’s Mom always kept an eye to make sure we didn’t get hit by a car.

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As if they could do anything but scream. They never bugged us dinner.

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Then, we heard some serious yelling to get inside.  NOW!

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Then, it was back to playing outdoors. One kid had a pool. Two words. Marco. POLO!

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We also walked around the neighborhood a lot.  No need to make a play date.

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We played Hide n’ Go Seek or “Tag, you’re it!” and ran around laughing a lot.

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Sometimes, our destination was nearby Dyker Heights Park so we could ride swings.

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As our Dads played Bocci (like outdoor bowling for grown Italian men) there…

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We sauntered to the adjacent golf course & got in trouble chasing & collecting golf balls.

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Kids run REAL fast when men waving golf clubs chase them.  What a workout!

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We also played handball after getting chased off the golf course.

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Or rode our bikes.

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We were always moving.

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Even while indoors, we played games that had us moving, like TWISTER.

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Or we danced to records imitating dancers on American Bandstand and Soul Train.

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It all meant we burned off enough energy to  STOP EVERYTHING for Mr. Softie.

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Then, kids sprinted downstairs or upstairs for money. There was also Danny,

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Danny, the ice cream man. But, we weren’t obese because we weren’t sedentary.

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No iPADS, no iPHONES, no sitting on the couch all day for us.  When school was done, we were outside playing and didn’t go back inside until weheard the screams for dinner.

Since we got out of school at 3 p.m. and dinner wasn’t usually until 7 p.m. we got a full
4-hours of physical activity and that didn’t include gym class at school.

Kids today look more like this.

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Or this when they get home from school.

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A study recently published in Experimental Physiology examined the effects of prolonged sitting (three continuous hours) on girls ages 9 to 12.

One group was asked to sit still, either watching a movie or playing video games for three hours, while another group exercised lightly at the beginning of each hour before sitting again.

At the end of the experiment, researchers found the group that sat still for the entire three hours experienced a major decrease in vascular function.

That 33 percent decrease in function means  the leg arteries were no longer working as well as they should.  In adults, this very thing—over time—has been linked to increased risk of developing heart disease. 

The bottom line is kids suffer from being sedentary just like adults.

When it comes to kid’s fitness it doesn’t cost much to keep them active. So take a note of all the things we did to stay fit while we were kids in Brooklyn to spark a few ideas.

A stick from an old broom, Spaulding ball, hula hoop, a jump rope, a handball, a waffle bat & ball, chalk, radio, roller skates, a rope for tug-of-war, TWISTER game, softball, basketball net, basketball, horseshoe toss –are all things still available and cheap.

Socializing in real life is just as important for kids as it is for adults.

Some of the things we did didn’t cost a penny.  Jumping jacks, dancing, running, walking, swimming and jumping hydrants were all free.  Limit gadget and TV viewing.  Encourage creativity when it comes to keeping them moving while having fun, even while indoors.

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Healthy kids are happy kids that will grow up with healthy habits.

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Stay healthy!

maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

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Why You Need To Protect Eyeballs From Sun

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Most of us think to pack the sunscreen when heading outdoors into the sun, but we might not always remember to grab a pair of shades.

 

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According to Reecha Kampani, M.D., an ophthalmologist at Cleveland Clinic, putting on sunglasses is more than a fashion statement.

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She says protecting eyes from UV rays is just as important as protecting skin.

“”UV protection is good for all kinds of structures of the eye, like the eyelids, the cornea, conjunctiva, the lenses and retina tissue itself,”” says Dr. Kampani. “”You can get damage and changes of the eye with exposure to UV light, so protection is very important.””

Dr. Kampani says it is actually possible to get a sunburn on the eyelids and while rare, if exposed to too much UV light, the cornea, which is the clear tissue over the eye, can get a thermal burn, which can be very painful.

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“Long-term exposure to UV light can lead to the formation of cataracts or macular degeneration.”

Dr. Kampani recommends wearing sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat even on moderately sunny or overcast days, to make sure eyes are protected.

Wrap-around sunglasses are best if heading out in the sun all day, as they can keep light from coming in through the top and the sides of the glasses.

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The good news is that people don’’t have to spend a fortune to keep their eyes protected.

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Dr. Kampani says buying discounted sunglasses is fine, but it’’s a good idea to replace inexpensive glasses yearly.

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“”If you’’re buying lenses that are at more discounted places, that’’s fine,” said Dr. Kampani. “A lot of times they still do have full protection, but you have to keep in mind that it could be something that’s more temporary, like a spray-on coating, that won’t last as long.””

It’’s also a good idea to keep in mind that artificial UV light, like the kind that is found in tanning beds, is just as bad for the eyes as it is for the skin.

Remember, when you’re outdoors or out in the field as we say in TV, wear sunglasses OR a hat to protect your eyeballs.

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Stay healthy!

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maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

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Access CCNS Video for Soundbites and B-Roll Video:

Cleveland Clinic Newsroom
Video download password: CLEclinic1921
Username: dailyvosots
Password: dailyvosotsftp
Username: CCNews
Password: CCNews1

Pathfire: If you’re using the web browser, click on the ‘Provider Directory’ and look for the ‘Cleveland Clinic’ tab. Use the ‘Video News Feed Locator’ if you’re getting Pathfire via satellite.
*Also, now available using app.extremereach.com – select the ‘Cleveland Clinic’ destination to view the files. If you need assistance, contact videonetwork@extremereach.com

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Maria Dorfner is the founder of NewsMD Communications, specializing in health and wellness since 1993.  She began working in media in 1983 on the Today Show at NBC in New York City as a p/t fill-in for co-host, Bryant Gumbel’s assistant while she was still in college. She also worked part-time in Barnes & Noble bookstore at Pace University (she worked at Barnes and Noble Fifth Avenue during all of high school) and part-time as a sales associate in Sak’s Fifth Avenue. She is an English major with national honors and Political Science minor. She served in NYC’s Intercollegiate Model City Council, having been selected by her Political Science Professor to join honor pre-law students on the council with actual council members to represent NYC on the council.

Upon graduation, Maria was hired full-time at NBC. Three years later, she helped launch their cable station, CNBC out of Ft. Lee, NJ.  She produced three talk show pilots that were successfully nationally syndicated with a Who’s Who in medicine, media, politics and entertainment as guests. She conducted research, fact-checked, wrote questions, pre-interview guests in the green room and produced segments and shows from concept to completion.  She was director of research for Ailes Communications, a political consulting firm and production company run by the departed, Mr. Ailes who went on to become president of CNBC and later chairman of Fox News Channel.

“I never saw the negative side of Roger. Yes, he was tough. Yes, he’d fire someone on the spot, but he was nothing but respectful of me and other female colleagues. He was a media genius and I was fortunate to learn from him. Anyone that says otherwise didn’t know him. It was a different time then. Women, including myself didn’t dress like we were going to a nightclub to tell the news. We were professional. Ever notice the first women to shout sexual harassment look like they’re either doing a push-up bra or pantyhose commercial while anchoring? They’ll defend themselves by saying they should be able to dress however they want and not expect anyone to treat them differently.  Really?   I don’t expect my male colleagues to come to work bare chested with suspenders. And then sue me if I make a comment.  It’s ridiculous. I think a bit of common sense and professionalism in order.”

In 1993, Maria created 7 half-hour original health series for CNBC. They included Healthcare Consumers, Healthy Living, Lifestyles and Longevity and others.
She co-anchored them for 3 years before joining NBC Miami as their medical and special projects producer. She then relocated to North Carolina and launched her own production company, while producing 21st Century Medicine documentary series for Discovery Health, weekly JAMA Reports for networks and medical segment for iTV. She traveled to Stockholm, Spain, Paris, London and all over the U.S. conducting interviews and filming segments.

She won a Media Recognition Award from the American Heart Association for national series Heart Smart, an Outstanding Achievement Award from the March of Dimes, a Medical Reporting Scholarship from the American Medical Association, a Freddie Award for Excellence in Medical Reporting, an Advanced Writing Scholarship from NBC News, an Outstanding Leadership Abilities Award from Pace University, a Commitment to the Advancement of Women in Media Award from her alma mater, Pace University.

She mentors journalism students and is the author of PRESSure: Break Into Broadcasting, Healthy Within and a little cookbook she created for her family to preserve family recipes called, Health, Heart & Humor In An Italian-American Kitchen.   Her books are available at Barnes and Noble and Amazon. She has worked with a Who’s Who in Medical and Health, trained PR departments, trained people wanting to work on-camera, and created a newsroom from scratch for MedPage Today and others, trained associate producers on Good Morning America to be producers, and in 2000 launched the Cleveland Clinic News Service (CCNS).

This is her blog.

“I’m blessed with amazing health all my life;  doctors ask what I do.”

~Maria Dorfner

contact:  maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

Why Spinning Is Hot & How To Do It Well

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spin13These Spin tips will keep you sweating, smiling and secure knowing you’re doing it right.

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First, here’s a little history on how Spinning was first created. Back in the ’90’s medical anchor, Ileana Bravo and I interviewed the founder of something people in Miami were talking about called “Spinning.”  We produced a health segment for NBC Miami and interviewed the Founder of it.  His name was Johnny G.

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The TODAY SHOW picked up the Miami story and spinning spun off nationwide. Johnny G. wanted other people to be able to reach their champion within from anywhere the same way he desired to after being sidelined in a car accident.

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The founder, Johnny G’s full name is Johnny Goldberg. He was a champion endurance bicycle racer. His passion to create a different type of indoor bike was ignited after he was hit by a car while training on his bike outdoors at night.

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Following that accident, Johnny G. spent ten years developing the right type of indoor cycle that would feel like his real road bike.

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The Spinner® bike officially launched in NYC in 1993 and was offered at Crunch Gyms.

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Here’s what the bike looks like.

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Spinning is still hotter than ever because of all of the above and more.

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Print

Now you know why it’s so popular with men and women. Here’s how to do it right.

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Proper set-up and form helps you avoid injury and maximize all those health perks.

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Everyone can benefit from a few expert tips. Numero Uno:  Warm up.

Best Warm Up Moves Before Spinning

by Brian Willett

Warm-up moves can help you burn more calories, reduce risk of injury, and improve your performance on the bike. Of course, certain warm-up moves will be more effective than others, so choosing well is important.

Quadriceps Moves

Your quadriceps — the large group of four muscles on the front of your thighs — drives the motion of spinning workouts, providing power to move the pedals. You can get your quadriceps ready for spinning with body-weight squats, light pedaling and the standing quadriceps stretch. To perform that stretch, stand with one hand leaning on a wall for support, and the other hand holding your foot to your buttocks so you are standing on one leg. Be sure to flex your knee completely when performing the standing quadriceps stretch to ensure you are fully stretching the muscle.

Hamstrings Moves

Your hamstrings are located on the back of your upper leg, and like the quadriceps, they are involved in every pedal stroke when spinning. An easy way to get your hamstrings ready for spinning is to bend over and touch your toes. You can also sit down and perform a sit-and-reach motion. According to a study from the February 2005 edition of the “Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research,” performing static stretches rather than dynamic moves is preferable for improving flexibility.

Back Moves

Your back muscles have to work hard to maintain proper posterior chain alignment and prevent you from slouching over when you ride. Thus, it’s important that you warm up your back muscles to prepare them for that work. You can stretch your back muscles in several ways, such as by lying on your back and pulling your knees to your chest, or doing the cat-cow stretch.

Shoulder Moves

Although your shoulders don’t push the pedals, they do help support your upper body while you ride and assist in steering. Moves such as jumping jacks, arm circles, and extending your arms behind your back as far as you can will help you get your shoulders loose and ready for your spinning class.

Calf Moves

The muscles of your calves are small, but they can produce a lot of power when cycling. Both squats and jumping jacks can help warm up your calves, but you may also wish to perform calf stretches while leaning against a wall. To do so, put both hands on a wall and lean into the wall, with one leg bent at the knee and one extended fully back.

 

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Now that you’re warmed up, I spoke with Spin Instructor Pro, Julie Insogna to get more tips:



FIRST, TELL US WHEN AND WHY YOU GOT INTERESTED IN SPINNING?

Thank you, Julie Insogna!

 

NEXT, MORE GREAT SPIN TIPS BY DEB CHESLOW:

What to Wear in Spin Class

spin3When you first start spin, you might want to wear padded cycle shorts as the saddle takes some getting used to.

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Most spin classes have bikes with pedals that accommodate people in sneakers in addition to one or two types of cycle clips that attach to cycling shoes.

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When we first started spin, we wore sneakers for a couple months before making the commitment to buy the shoes. In hindsight, we would have purchased those “spin shoes” much sooner, as you have so much more leverage and less wiggling when you’re clipped into the spin pedals. It also puts much less stress on your shins and toes!

How to Set Up Your Bike

Spin class bikes are not beach cruisers. You don’t want your knees crumpled; you don’t even want them at a 90-degree angle.

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You want your knees to be slightly extended but not so much that you can’t put full pressure on the down stroke of your pedal.

 

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Most spin enthusiasts also bring their bike handles up higher than they would a road or mountain bike to accommodate running out of the saddle (we’ll get to this in a minute).

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And, make sure that you’re not reaching dramatically to those handlebars when you’re seated on the bike.

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Everything is adjustable and this is where it’s most important that your spin instructor get you dialed in.

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Spin is All About Tension and Tempo

Your spin instructor expects you to keep tempo with the song so that everyone in the class is on the correct “leg” for certain activities.

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Tension knobs on the bike will take you from no tension to “drag” (where you begin to feel tension or “the road” as they call it) and subsequent turns up from there make the ride increasingly “steep.”

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While no beginner in spin class is expected to keep high tempo AND tension like the advanced riders are accustomed to, you want to work your way into higher tension as it burns more fat and enhances your cardio workout.

Initially, though, just focus on the tempo, right, left, right left, right left, march!

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About Jogging, Sprinting and Running Out of the Saddle in Spin Class

 

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Spin usually requires seated climbs and runs as well as “running out of the saddle” where you’re actually jogging or sprinting while standing above the saddle of the bike.

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For beginners, the runs out of the saddle can be too demanding.

DON’T LET PEER PRESSURE CONVINCE YOU TO RUN WHEN YOU’RE NOT READY TO.

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Most spin enthusiasts have been doing this a long time, BUT they started right where you are starting. When you try to run out of the saddle at the same amount of time or distance these “regulars” are accustomed to, you can hurt yourself.

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Swallow your pride and stay in the saddle, keeping tempo and increasing your tension slightly until you feel you can take on a jog initially for a few given seconds. Build up from there!

When you begin to run out of the saddle, do NOT lean your body weight (or your elbows!) on your handlebars.

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This puts too much torque on your knees and can damage them. Rest your hands lightly on the handlebars and focus on sitting back, above the saddle, so the strong leg muscles of your quads and hamstrings are doing the work.

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Your spin class instructor will take you on intermittent (and imaginary, of course) hills, downhills and road runs.

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At times, he or she will ask you to do intervals where you sit in the saddle for a number of counts, then run above the saddle for the same number of counts – and sometimes, these counts can be just 2 or 4!

Remember the rules during intervals (or “jumps”) – if you’re not ready, sit your butt down and just keep pedaling.

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If you are ready, try a few, making sure you don’t lean on the handlebars.

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About “Hill Climbing” in Spin Class

Sitting on the saddle and pedaling in spin class does not necessarily mean you’re resting or “recovering.”

In fact, riding “in the saddle” with solid tension will burn more calories than sprinting.

 

A good spin instructor will methodically increase tension as you ride in the saddle, effectively making you feel like you’re pedaling up an increasingly steep hill.

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In these situations, you want to protect your knees once again by sitting as far back on the saddle as you can.

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By doing so, you’re  taking the pressure of the climb off your knees and re-depositing it where it belongs – in the strong muscles of your rear end. (And last time we checked, most people didn’t need to do much toning of their knee caps.)

Beware These Spin Instructor Indiscretions …

If your spin class instructor suddenly changes counts or actions, consider that a red flag – your instructor should give you full and fair warning in advance as to what’s coming up at least a few counts down the road.

As an example, we have a great (certified) spin instructor who’s been teaching for years. As one song ends and the other begins, he might say, “This is an interval run in the saddle and out of the saddle with 30 seconds up, and 30 seconds’ recovery in between.”

Then, as the song plays, he will be adding comments such as, “Next round is just 20 seconds up, same recovery.”  It’s enough to keep you informed and keep you hanging on knowing that the NEXT song will be a completely different action!

Some spin instructors will also make the error of doing extreme activities for too long. (Personally, we think this is an ego thing where they’re more concerned with looking better than the rest of the class riders than actually guiding the riders and watching the riders for signs of fatigue.)

As an example, we’ve been in classes with spin instructors who sprint (at least double-time to the beat of the song) out of the saddle for the entirety of the song. If it’s a short song around 2 minutes, and if the spin instructor offers optional breaks to sit down during the course of the song, that’s OK.

If, however, they insist on everyone in the class sprinting for a long duration, even the most advanced riders will have difficulty maintaining proper form.

In other cases, you might see a spin instructor insist on short intervals with 2 beats in the saddle and 2 beats above the saddle for several minutes at a time. An extended session of “jumps” can cause any rider to break good form, thus putting the knees at risk.

Again, if it begins to feel too much for you or a particular session of activity (jumps or sprints or hill climbing) is forcing you out of maintaining correct posture and form, SIT DOWN!

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Then, as you try different classes with different instructors, you will begin to see which instructors are actually the best teachers. Even as they push you and do advanced work, they are still watching their riders to ensure safety and fun.

This brings another point to mind: Only take spin classes where the instructor is situated to watch the riders during the class. He or she will either be riding with the group and facing a mirror, or the spin instructor can position the bike to face the riders. It’s important that the gym provide this aspect in the spin class.

Music Can Be Key

Every spin instructor has a different style and collection of music. If you don’t like the style or can’t stand the music, move on. Because spin is built on the tempo of the songs, when you like what you’re hearing, you’re better able to keep the pace.

When you’re in a spin class with an instructor you enjoy and music that’s more to your liking, you’ll find the hour zips by. (Honest!)

Stick With It!

When you’re a beginner, try not to quit and leave the spin class (though no one will call you names if you do). Just sit down in the saddle, take the tension down, and continue to peddle through the end of the class if you can.

You’ll be prouder of yourself for enduring, and you can push yourself in the next class to stay up and in the class activity another few moments. Give yourself permission to build into this activity and you’ll find that you enjoy it more each time.

Recommended Links:  

“7 THINGS YOU’RE DOING WRONG IN SPIN CLASS”
https://www.wellandgood.com/good-sweat/7-things-youre-doing-wrong-in-spin-class-and-how-to-fix-them/

 

Johnny G. himself has an instruction video and  Spinning Instructor Certification info at:
http://spinning.com/johnny-g-live/

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Thanks Johnny G. for keeping us sweating and smiling.

 

You can find a variety of Spin Shoes & Shorts on Amazon at:
https://www.amazon.com

 

Now you know why…

 

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And why you should too!

One thing I forgot to mention is you may loathe your first spinning class. It will be hard. You will ache. You may walk out of a class early. You might exclaim, “Never again!” But, as with anything worthwhile, as we’ve heard from Spinning Pro, Julie Insogna, Co-Owner of Prime Cycle in Hoboken, NJ — if you commit to it, the rewards are worth it.

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Your physical and mental endurance will keep getting stronger.

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“Unleash the champion within.” ~Johnny G

 

Be sure to tune into Good Morning America next Wednesday when my the artist of my favorite Spinning tune will be performing LIVE!

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blog contact:  maria.dorfner@yahoo.com