82-Year-Old Woman Reverses Dementia

Sylvia reversed her dementia by changing the foods she eats and making other changes

This is a story worth repeating because these statistics are alarming.

An estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s disease in 2019

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Last year, an 82-year-old woman who suffered from dementia, who couldn’t recognize her own son, miraculously got her memory back after changing her diet.

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This is exactly what Dr. Daniel Amen recently talked about on a recent episode of Late Night Health with Mark Alyn. Your brain needs nourishment with good food, beverages, sleep and exercise to function at its best today, tomorrow and in the future.

Dementia is not a natural part of aging, nor is Alzheimer’s. And it can be reversed.

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Dr. Dean Ornish and his wife Anne also talked to Oprah on Soul Sunday about how what foods you eat and lifestyle changes can reverse chronic disease like heart disease. His book, “UnDo It!” talks about how simple lifestyle changes can reverse most chronic diseases.

This 82-year-old woman reversed her dementia by changing her food and lifestyle.

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When his mother’s condition became so severe  for her own safety she had to be kept in the hospital, Mark Hatzer almost came to terms with losing another parent.

Sylvia had lost her memory and parts of her mind, she had even phoned the police once accusing the nurse who were caring for her of kidnap.

A change in diet, which was comprised of high amounts of blueberries and walnuts, has proven to have had a strong impact on Sylvia’s condition that her recipes are now being shared by the Alzheimer’s Society.

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Sylvia also began incorporating other health foods, including broccoli, kale, spinach, sunflower seeds, green tea, oats, sweet potatoes and even dark chocolate with a high percentage of cacao. All of these foods are known to be beneficial for brain health.

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Mark and Sylvia devised to diet together after deciding that the medication on its own was not enough, they looked into the research showing that rates of dementia are much lower in Mediterranean countries and copied a lot of their eating habits.

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According to Mirror.co.uk

Mark, whose brother Brent also died in 1977, said: “When my mum was in hospital she thought it was a hotel – but the worst one she had ever been in.

“She didn’t recognise me and phoned the police as she thought she’d been kidnapped.

“Since my dad and brother died we have always been a very close little family unit, just me and my mum, so for her to not know who I was was devastating.

“We were a double act that went everywhere together. I despaired and never felt so alone as I had no other family to turn to.

“Overnight we went from a happy family to one in crisis.

“When she left hospital, instead of prescribed medication we thought we’d perhaps try alternative treatment.

“In certain countries Alzheimer’s is virtually unheard of because of their diet.

“Everyone knows about fish but there is also blueberries, strawberries, Brazil nuts and walnuts – these are apparently shaped like a brain to give us a sign that they are good for the brain.”

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There were also some cognitive exercises that Mark and his mother would do together like jigsaw puzzles crosswords and meeting people in social situations, Sylvia would also exercise by using a pedaling device outfitted for her chair.

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Mark said, “It wasn’t an overnight miracle, but after a couple of months she began remembering things like birthdays and was becoming her old self again, more alert, more engaged..

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“People think that once you get a diagnosis your life is at an end. You will have good and bad days, but it doesn’t have to be the end. For an 82-year-old she does very well, she looks 10 years younger and if you met her you would not know she had gone through all of this.

“She had to have help with all sorts of things, now she is turning it around. We are living to the older age in this country, but we are not necessarily living healthier.”

The Body’s Ability To Heal Is Greater Than Anyone Has Permitted You To Believe

This story just goes to show how resilient our bodies really are if given the right environment. Most of these types of diseases are often related to diet in the first place so that means that they can indeed be reversed with a proper diet.

Sure, some of them are genetic and you might be a carrier of the gene, but that is not a guarantee that it will become active, there are things you can do to minimize the risk.

Our health is our greatest wealth. We have to realize that we do have a say in our lives and what our fate is.

“We now show that some of the highest levels of aluminium ever measured in human brain tissue are found in individuals who have died with a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer’s disease.” -Professor Exley

Please share this article with anyone you know who knows someone who is suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s.

For more visit: https://www.collective-evolution.com

Alzheimer’s-like symptoms reversed in mice thanks to special diet of green tea and carrots that restored working memory

  • Researchers fed some mice genetically programmed to develop Alzheimer’s a diet with EGCG, found in green tea, and FA, found in carrots
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  • EGCG is an antioxidant that prevents free radicals from forming and FA is best known for its benefits for the skin
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  • After three months, mice fed this diet had memory and visual-spatial skills restored and could find their way out of a maze as well as healthy mice
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  • Scientists say it seems the compounds help prevent proteins from forming clumps on the brain and causing cognitive decline

A diet with compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer’s-like symptoms in new experiments, a new study suggests.

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Researchers say that mice genetically programmed to develop the disease had memory and visual-spatial skills restored and could find their way out of a maze just as well as healthy mice.

The team, from the University of Southern California, note that it’s possible the discoveries made in the rodents may not be able to be replicated in humans.

However, they add that the findings could lead to plant-based supplements being used in combination with drugs to prevent or slow down dementia symptoms.

A new study from the University of Southern California found that mice fed a diet with compounds found in green tea and carrots had their memory and visual-spatial skills restored (file image)

 

Please check prior blog for safe tea brands that do not contain plastic.

 

An estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s disease in 2019

 

 

 

Maria Shriver Creates 1st Coloring Book for Alzheimer’s Patients

Maria has created the first coloring book for Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers.  And we’re excited about it.  I’ve known Maria Shriver since the ’80s and even had an opportunity to fill-in for her during technical rehearsals on an NBC show called Main Street. She and Bryant Gumbel hosted it.  She’s an incredibly intelligent, affable and warm person. So, I’m delighted to share this news with you.

 

Maria with her dad, Sargent Shriver, diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2003
[Photo Credit:  Laurence L. Levin]

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The project was inspired by Shriver’s quest to find ways to be close to her father, Sargent Shriver, diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2003.  He passed away in 2011.

“When I would go to visit my dad as his disease progressed, I had fewer and fewer things that I could do with him,” Shriver told NBC’s TODAY.

I could take a walk with him, but a lot of times he didn’t want to walk. I played puzzles with him and sometimes drew on a piece of paper.”

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Images in Maria Shriver’s book were developed through visits to the nursing home.  They include upbeat, positive, fun, hopeful images for stress-relief.

It also includes tips for caregivers culled from conversations with doctors and families.

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Dr. Richard Isaacson, director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital says the coloring book can help start a conversation and help families do an activity together.

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Isaacson tells TODAY, “The person with Alzheimer’s may not be able to communicate his or her thoughts as well as they used to or may not remember what happened to the conversation 10 minutes ago, but they’re able to express themselves through art — through drawing.”

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Dr. Isaacson continues, “Some patients with Alzheimer’s like to move and can’t sit still… coloring is a great way to refocus negative energy and do something more calm.”

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June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. More than 5M Americans live with it–one in 8 people age 65 and older, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

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Maria Shriver says this coloring book is a labor of love, “I’m really hopeful this is filling a void and a need and will change people’s lives,” she says, noting she would have liked to have shared it with her dad.

“I think it would have brought laughter. It would have enabled us to do something together.”

We think so too.  Thank you, Maria Shriver.
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Visit NBC TODAY for more on Maria Shriver’s story:
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Links to Purchase Maria’s book at end of article.
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Consequently, a year ago, I was interviewed by Cable Neuhaus in the Saturday Evening Post about the health benefits of adults coloring. He saw my positive FB posts about it.

I told Neuhaus I never stopped coloring, but thought it was an oddball habit of mine.

Years ago, while working at The Crayola Experience in Easton, PA I observed parents enjoy coloring as much as kids and posted about it on FB. They looked so relaxed.

I thought they’re in the moment –essentially what meditation is all about. Makes sense.

Shortly thereafter, adult coloring books began to appear.

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See out Norman Rockwell content!

Coloring Books for Grown-ups

In Issue:

If, as some say, you can judge an entire society by the way it treats its most vulnerable, then I’d argue it is equally fair to measure a nation by the way its citizens fritter away their spare time.

Lately, Americans are frittering like mad in a couple of surprising ways: on outdoor courts playing a game called pickleball, and in coloring books.

Let’s begin with the coloring books, which are meant for adults. The craze began more than a year ago. Color me skeptical, even now, but the wild enthusiasm for this hobby shows no signs of fading. Several of the books sit atop our national best-seller lists. (Johanna Basford’s Secret Garden was the first of the blockbusters, but dozens have followed.) Who, exactly, is buying these — and why?

An admission: When I heard about this fad, my initial thought was unashamedly elitist. What kind of latte-fueled exurbanite would exchange nightly yoga classes for the joylessness of coloring? Maybe someone with no life to speak of? Okay, big mistake. Huge. Turns out that adult coloring books are a raging success across nearly every shade and stratum of the American landscape, from pastures to plains to the towers of Manhattan.

Take, as an example, Maria Dorfner, a native New Yorker who freelance produces at networks. “It calms and centers my mind,” Dorfner, an avid colorer, told me. “Adults need to learn to be more in the moment, like kids with crayons.”

Asked about a Psychology Today story that contended coloring cannot possibly constitute a spiritual experience, despite claims to the contrary by the hobby’s millions of evangelists, Dorfner says, “They’re just wrong about that.” Backing her up is a widely shared perception that coloring does indeed both soothe and heal the mind. (And let’s please agree that the illustrators of these exquisitely drawn books are artists; the color-inners are not.)

“Adults need to learn to be more in the moment, like kids with crayons,” one avid colorer says.

So, what we have here in our go-go digital age is an analog diversion for stressed-out grown-ups. One sits and colors and dreams, and the day’s tiny troubles appear to vanish.

At the other end of the spectrum is a (slightly) more physically demanding pastime, the game of pickleball. Imagine tennis played with wiffle balls and paddles on a diminutive court — Ping-Pong on a grander scale. The sport has rapidly attracted participants coast to coast, mainly among oldsters: The thrill of victory never flags, but the viability of older knees often does, alas.

This helps explain why pickleball, which has been around for a while, exploded in popularity only recently, as our aging population surged. The USA Pickleball Association reports it witnessed an 84 percent membership increase in the last two years alone and now boasts more than 400,000 active players. An Oregon documentarian is developing a movie about its rise.

Steve Brodsky, a 61-year-old Floridian, captured the excitement perfectly: “Pickleball is for older folks who’ve got the fire in the belly,” he told me. “Guys like me can feel, ‘Wow, I’ve still got it!’”

Hot on pickleball’s heels is a variation on that game called POP Tennis, a rebranded version of what we once knew as paddle tennis. Backed by a fresh infusion of cash from Hollywood agent Ken Lindner (Matt Lauer and Lester Holt are among his clients), the U.S. POP Tennis Association is currently rolling out a national tour. It’s aimed at picking up where pickleball leaves off. The appeal of POP Tennis, Lindner told me, is that “anyone can play, young or old. If you can walk, you can hit the ball immediately.”

What conclusions can be drawn from these trends? Well, whether we choose a pencil or a paddle, and whatever our age, Americans seldom let time go to waste. It’s in our character to be restless; it’s a trait that’s long served us well.

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Don’t forget to pick up a copy of Maria Shriver’s book. Links to purchasing it here:

Barnes and Noble:

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/color-your-mind-maria-shriver/1126249685

Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Color-Your-Mind-Coloring-Alzheimers/dp/1944515488

If you’re an Alzheimer’s caregiver and you pick up the book, please let me know if and how it’s helped. I’d love to hear and share your story.  Email: maria.dorfner@yahoo.com
Subject line:  Caregiver Story: Color Your Mind book

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Thank you Maria Shriver for helping Alzheimer’s patients and caregivers!

mariadorfnerheadshot2   Maria Dorfner is the founder NewsMD Communications and Healthy Within Network.  This is her blog.   Contact: maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

Unconditional Love When Caring for a Parent With Alzheimer’s

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More than 15.5 million Americans (family members and friends) provide unpaid care for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia.

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Women make up 65% percent of caregivers for people with these illnesses, putting them at the center of the growing Alzheimer’s crisis.

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Alzheimer’s disease makes people forget things which can frustrate family members or friends.

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Symptoms include memory loss and the inability to do normal tasks like cooking and dressing. They don’t list food and beverages in Causes below, but I think what you eat and drink plays a HUGE role in how your brain functions.

Add how much sleep and exercise you get too –basically your daily habits and lifestyle.  It’s not normal aging. In fact, it’s abnormal aging.

Avoid stress and triggers, as those are the things that make you reach for unhealthy foods, beverages or habits. Sometimes, stress is absolutely unavoidable.

A daily commute can stress you out.  Add people who gossip, complain and whine and it’s enough to exhaust you.

If that’s the case BREATHE FIRST. Take a walk. Distract yourself with something positive, smile at someone who may be having an even worse day than you, and allow that stressful moment to pass. It will.

 

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Being a Caretaker for someone with Alzheimer’s is stressful.

I talk to Kailen Rosenberg, known as the “Love Architect” and an expert on unconditional love is the author of Real Love, Right Now. 

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She talks about the importance of unconditional love when you are a caretaker.

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She is joined by Betsy Broyles Arnold, who was caregiver for her mother who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease.

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They discuss the challenging role of the caregiver and the impact of Alzheimer’s disease that many often do not see.

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Click Link for Interview:  https://www.hightail.com/download/UlRSMFh2cGtlM1R2WnRVag

 a51About Kailen Rosenberg: 

Known as “Love Architect” Kailen Rosenberg is more than just a matchmaker but a teacher of “love on a higher level.” She’s been featured as a regular guest on more than 400 print, online, radio and television interviews, including the Today Show, Good Moring America, Cosmopolitan, Men’s Fitness, Marie Claire, Redbook, Self, Oprah.com, the Oprah Winfrey Network, BBC Worldwide, E4, The Huffington Post, and more.  For more information please visit http://www.thelovearchitect.com

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About Betsy Broyles Arnold

Betsy is the daughter of football icon Coach Frank Broyles who, along with her twin sister, Linda, became the primary caregiver to their mother, Barbara, who lost her battle with Alzheimer’s in 2004.  That experience led her — together with her sister and father — to create The Frank and Barbara Broyles Foundation to help families and caregivers who are caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s.

For more information please visit: http://www.alzheimersunconditionallove.com

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headshot  MARIA DORFNER is the founder of NewsMD. She began her career at NBC with an internship in 1983, and began specializing in medical/health ten years later.  She can be reached at maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

NEW ALZHEIMER’S DISCOVERY: Predict Alzheimer’s 5-10 Years Early

Researchers think they have found a marker of change in the brain that precedes the onset of the disease by five to 10 years, before dementia sets in.

The key to early detection is found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain and spinal cord.

Researchers say that patients already diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment show a drop in levels, which appear to be a sign of Alzheimer’s years before symptoms develop.

The discovery is published in this month’s issue of Archives of General Psychiatry.

The study results stem from more than nine years of follow-up to prior research that had involved 137 patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, a mental state that often precedes dementia.

Over the course of the study, nearly 54 percent of the patients went on to develop Alzheimer’s, while another 16 percent were ultimately diagnosed with different forms of dementia.

The study team said that they believe that about nine out of every 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment who experience such fluid shifts will eventually go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

The results of the European study largely echo those of a trial reported by researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health in 2010.

Methods of early detection might prove valuable for research into the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

More information

Use the search bar on this blog to find all articles on Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s News – Friday, January 6, 2012