Dr. Oz: How to Boost Your Metabolism All Day Long

Here are some fantastic tips from Dr. Oz on how to boost your metabolism all day long:

6:30 A.M.
Do a little yoga. It can double your metabolic rate first thing in the morning. I recommend a gentle cycle of two sun salutations. If you’re new to yoga, check out my seven-minute morning routine (which also includes a few strength-building exercises).

6:40 A.M. 
Drink cold water. Five hundred milliliters of H2O (a little more than a pint) may spike metabolism by 30 percent for as long as an hour. Water triggers the sympathetic nervous system, which in turn stimulates your metabolism. Cold water may also force your body to use energy to warm it.

6:50 A.M. 
Take 500 milligrams of white bean extract. In a 2007 study, people who took the extract (which may slow the absorption of carbs) for 30 days experienced a significant improvement in their muscle-to-fat ratio. That’s good news for metabolism since muscle burns about three times more calories than fat.

7:00 A.M. 
Eat a protein-packed breakfast. Digesting protein takes up to seven times more energy than digesting carbohydrates or fat. Try making a dozen hard-boiled eggs on Sunday, and eat one or two each day.

8:00 A.M. 
Enjoy a cup of joe. Caffeine promotes an increase in norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that keeps your sympathetic nervous system activated and your metabolic rate humming. According to research, coffee may increase the amount of energy you burn by 16 percent for up to two hours.

9:30 A.M. 
Take 50 milligrams of forskolin. Recent studies indicate that compounds in forskolin—an extract derived from a medicinal plant—might break down fat and help raise levels of thyroid hormones, which play an important role in regulating the speed of metabolism.

10:00 A.M.
Snack on tahini dip. Tahini is made from sesame seeds, a rich source of zinc. And zinc may increase the production of leptin, a hormone that improves metabolism and curbs appetite.
11:15 A.M.
Chew a stick of sugarless gum. New England Journal of Medicine study found that this mindless activity can help your body burn 19 percent more calories per hour. (At that rate, if you chewed gum every waking hour, you’d lose 11 pounds over the course of a year! And likely drive everyone around you nuts.)
12:00 P.M. 
Go for a brisk 15-minute walk. A trip around the block can triple your metabolic rate. This boost continues after you stop moving because the body consumes more oxygen, a crucial player in metabolism, when it’s recovering from exertion.
12:45 P.M.
Spice up lunch with peppers. Capsaicin, the key substance that makes chili peppers hot, stimulates your “fight or flight” stress response and may increase metabolism by 23 percent. Peppers may even improve your muscle-to-fat ratio: Research suggests that capsaicin inhibits the generation of fat cells.
2:00 P.M. 
Sip a cup of green teaThis miracle beverage pairs caffeine with a compound known as EGCG—and together they create an even greater bump in metabolism than caffeine alone. Studies also indicate that green tea may reduce body fatand trim the waistline.
5:00 P.M.
Use your muscles—with your mind. Believe it or not, visualizing a workout can actually trick your body into strengthening your calorie-zapping muscle: A Cleveland Clinicstudy discovered that participants who spent 15 minutes a day imagining flexing their biceps had a 13.5 percent increase in their strength after three months.
5:15 P.M.
Use your muscles—with your muscles. After age 30, we lose 3 to 8 percent of our muscle mass per decade, which is one of the main reasons metabolism slows. To counteract that loss, aim to do two to three 30-minute strength-training sessions a week, using moves that engage as many muscles as possible, like squatsplanks, and lunges.

6:30 P.M. 
Cook dinner with coconut oil. Most of the oils we eat are converted largely into fat. But coconut oil, with its unique molecular makeup, is rapidly converted into energy—and may causea 12 percent bump in your metabolism.

6:55 P.M. 
Add dairy to your meal. Calcium can help improve your muscle-to-fat ratio in two ways: It binds with fat to reduce the body’s absorption of fat. And any remaining calcium typically circulates in your bloodstream, helping to break down fat cells.

7:00 P.M. 
Garnish with dill weed or chives. Both of these herbs are packed with kaempferol, a flavonoid that has been shown to increase the production of metabolism-spurring thyroid hormones by about 150 percent.
7:45 P.M. 
Unwind with a glass of wine. Alcohol can raise your metabolic rate for up to 95 minutes. In fact, a large peer-reviewed study found that women who regularly enjoy a drink are seven to eight pounds lighter, on average, than teetotalers.

10:30 P.M.
Hit the hay. Irregular sleep patterns can disrupt the circadian rhythm of your cells, throwing your metabolism out of whack. Do your best to get a steady eight hours of rest each night.

Keep reading: 4 more ways to turn back the clock

Read more: http://www.oprah.com/health/How-to-Increase-Your-Metabolism-All-Day/7#ixzz1wSfYZpRa

Forbes Rates Squash as Healthiest Sport

Squash is rated as the healthiest sport in a survey conducted by the widely respected and influential US business magazine Forbes.

While accepting that Health and Fitness are different things the magazine has compiled a list of the 10 healthiest sports. Rating for the different sports are based on consultations with fitness experts – coaches, personal trainers, competitor and exercise physiologists – as well as a dash of personal experience.

The four basic physiological components or fitness are rated on a scale of 1 to 5. Injured risk is also considered.

Squash came out top of the 10 sports highlighted in  the survey.

1.         Squash
2.         Rowing
3.         Rock Climbing
4.         Swimming
5.         Cross-country Skiing
6.         Basketball
7.         Cycling
8.         Running
9.         Modern Pentathlon
10.       Boxing


Forbes states that: “The preferred game of Wall Street has convenience on its side, as 30 minutes on the squash court provides an impressive cardio respiratory workout. Extended rallies and almost constant running builds muscular strength and endurance in the lower body, while lunges, twists and turns increase flexibility in the back and abdomen. For people just getting into the game, it’s almost too much to sustain, but once you get there, squash is tremendous.”

Rating Methodology

Ratings are based upon consultations with fitness experts–coaches, personal trainers, competitors and exercise physiologists–as well as a dash of personal experience. The four basic physiological components of fitness are rated on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being “excellent,” 4 being “darn good,” 3 being “good,” 2 being “not bad” and 1 being “nothing special.”

Injury risk is rated on a scale of 1 to 3, with 3 being “low,” 2 being “so-so” and 1 being “high.” Calorie burn (in parentheses) is based upon the energy expenditure of a 190-pound person over 30 minutes and is rated on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being 450+ calories, 4 being 400-450 calories, 3 being 350-400 calories, 2 being 300-350 calories and 1 being 250-300 calories. Calorie burn rates are from the American College of Sports Medicine; whenever possible, we selected the rate for “moderate” or similar intensity.

Scores were tallied to arrive at an individual rating for each sport. Of course, physiological benefits, injury risks and calorie burn can vary widely depending upon the technique, vigor, care and enthusiasm with which you pursue the sport.

The Forbes website presents a slide show of the ten sports and their ratings. Click here for the slide show.

If you’d like to learn how to play squash, here are 15 Steps to get you started. http://startingsquash.com/

 

Excuse me while I go look up modern pentathlon. 🙂  Hmmm.  It includes five events: pistol shootingépée fencing, 200 m freestyle swimmingshow jumping, and a 3 km cross-country run.  My non-competitive walking did not make the list, but I say it’s the best.

Stay healthy!

Sober Up to Safe Soda and Cocktails

According to a survey conducted by the Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, 95 percent of people do not know what constitutes safe levels of drinking.  That’s a lot of ignorance. Maybe since they may be drunk, the “ignorance is bliss” adage rings true.

That said, I thought I’d take a moment to raise awareness because young people responded to the survey by saying they thought 8 or 9 drinks were “risk-free” and “safe.”  Pay attention and Sober Up youth of America and Australia.

FACT:  Safe drinking is TWO drinks per day for men and women.  Some say one for women.  For special occasions, FOUR drinks over 6 hours.

People will say things like, “Yeah…but I’m tall” or “I weigh a lot, so I can drink a lot more than the average bloke” to excuse going over that amount.  Some will even say the food they ate is absorbing the alcohol. Sober Up, excuse makers.

News Flash:  It may take longer for the alcohol to catch up with your cheeseburger and fries, but it will travel through your bloodstream just the same.  Your height, weight or food intake is not a reason to overindulge.

I never acquired a taste for beer or alcohol in my youth. It may have to do with my thought that alcohol was loaded with empty calories.  I was into fitness, even as a kid. So, my beverage of choice back then was TAB. What?

Back then, there was a commercial of Elle McPherson sauntering on a beach in a red bikini drinking TAB. I thought if I drank enough of it, I’d look like her.

I switched from the pink can to the one Paula Abdul was holding while dancing on Elton John‘s piano keys. I’m still not sure why I thought that was SO cool, but Abdul even set a fashion trend as we began wearing ties in college like Annie Hall.

Youth of America is easily influenced.  It’s not just me. Today, there are studies (see links at the end of this blog) that show teens are still influenced by what they see on television and in films.  Advertisers know this and they don’t give a hoot about your health. They care about you buying into whatever they’re selling.

It would be years before I learned the aspartame used in diet sodas increase insulin resistence, which leads to an increase in blood sugar, which leads to weight gain. That’s right.  They lied to the youth of America. I bet we can trace the “Obesity Epidemic” and “Increase in Diabetes” back to those TAB and Diet Coke commercials that brainwashed millions of us into thinking we were “healthy” if we were holding a can of diet soda in our hand.

By the time young people realize the truth, they are already: 1) old and 2)  suffering from strange ailments with unknown causes. I had cramps when I drank diet colas, and never imagined it could have been caused by the diet cola in my hand.

Another ailment so many in my own generation suffered from were infertility problems.  Lots of otherwise healthy people with healthy parents who had 3 to 6 kids with no problems were suddenly having issues.  We often joked something was in the water. Maybe something was in the SODA.  Today, if you google “toxic diet coke” on YouTube, you’ll find out the truth.  Chris Wragge at CBS interviewed Dr. Jennifer Ashton about the health dangers of diet soda and found they may increase your risk of stroke by 48 percent.  Sober Up on the Facts about Diet Soda by clicking on some of the links at the end of this article & watching the videos.

I’m happy I haven’t gone near diet soda in 7 years. I quit my diet cola and coffee addiction and now feel amazing. It wasn’t easy, but I feel incredibly healthy.

My advice to everyone is if you suffer from ANY aliment and you and/or physicians do not know the cause –look at what you’re eating and drinking FIRST.  Eliminate soda.  Your aches, pain or symptoms may mysteriously vanish naturally.  A safe soda choice is none. Unfortunately, it’s addicting so if you can’t shake your soda habit –take it one day at a time.  Try to limit it slowly until you can get rid of it completely. Switch to water as often as you can.

Back to alcohol. Is there any such thing as a smart cocktail?  Lisa Lillien says the following drinks are your best bet if you don’t want to pile on empty calories:

POMEGRANATE MARTINI.  A 4-oz. serving made with flavored vodka and pure pomegranate juice (half and half each) has about 185 calories. The juice packs a ton of flavor, plus a punch of antioxidants.

 

 

 

 

RED WINE. A glass of red wine is about 120 calories for 5 ounces.  If it’s a jumbo wine glass, she recommends not filling it to the top. Half works best.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAIQUIRI.  A low-cal daiquiri using frozen fruit with no added sugar.  Strawberries are a good choice because they’re naturally sweet: Mix 3 partially thawed berries in a blender with ice, 1/2 oz. lime juice, and a 1 1/2 oz. shot of rum. Add just enough water to blend.

 

 

 

    RASBERRY CHAMPAGNE.  Pour champagne, then add a few raspberries. That’s about 100 calories per 5-oz. glass.

 

 

 

 

 

   SPRITZER.  Add club soda and ice to a glass of white wine and voila.

 

 

 

 

CALORIE BOMBS

 

CHOCOLATE MARTINI. Lillien says to “Beware the chocolate martini.”  It’s loaded with heavy cream and sugary syrup, which can add up to 500 calories.

 

 

 

 

WARM MULLED WINE. Loaded with honey and sugar.

 

 

 

 

 

PINA COLADAS. These favorites can top 600 calories.

 

 

 

 

  CHAMPAGNE COCKTAILS. One flute with fruit juice and sugary liqueur will run more than 200 calories.

 

 

 

 

 

Remember, the safe limit is TWO drinks or FOUR drinks over 6-hours on special occasions.  Safe soda is NO SODA.

Share this information whenever you can. If anyone drinks more than that —don’t let them drive.  An innocent person shouldn’t die because you want to get a “buzz.”  How can you tell if you have a problem with alcohol? You can take this Quiz:  http://alcoholism.about.com/od/problem/a/blquiz1.htm

When is the right age to start talking to your kids about alcohol and safe drinking?  As young as 8-years-old.  Also remember that children learn by observing you.  So, Sober Up and talk to your children and teens about drinking safely, and not driving if they consume more than that. And set a good example yourself.

Stay Healthy.  Cheers!!!

🙂

[Source for smart drinks vs. dumb drinks: http://www.hungry-girl.com]

Health Benefits of Sushi

 
    

 
SushiSushi Nutrition Facts – Health Benefits of Sushi
   

English: Western Sushi found at Wegmans Superm...
Image via Wikipedia

For a person with normal health, sushi has many health benefits. All dishes (excluding eel, and some fusion style sushi) are low in saturated fat and high in protein. There may be a slight load in carbohydrates in thick sushi rolls, but it is negligible for nigiri sushi since they are small in amount.

High content of fish oil is the main health factor which promotes a healthy cardiovascular system. The hikarimono, or shiny fishes (mackerel, Spanish mackerel, sardine, Pacific Saury) contain the highest amounts of EPA and DHA omega3 fats. (Ironically they are the least expensive fishes). These fishes are also high in vitamin E which is a powerful antioxidant.

Nori contains a great source of minerals found in the ocean and vinegar acts as an important factor in promoting cell metabolism. People who use vinegar frequently (to dress salads, blend with soy sauce, or drink in small amounts (please refer to rice vinegar in choosing the best ingredients) have lower percentages of body fat.

Unfortunately, people with type I or II diabetes should stay away from sushi, and stick to sashimi. Individuals with high blood pressure must limit their use of soy sauce (see: how to eat sushi).

Source:  sushiencyclopedia.com

Sushi bento, with the sashimi on the top.
Image via Wikipedia

THE 6 BEST LOW-CALORIE SUSHI ROLLS ARE:

1.  VEGGIE ROLLS – 170 CALORIES, 5G FAT

2. MACKEREL – 232 CALORIES, 2G FAT

3. RAINBOW – 330 CALORIES, 8G FAT

4. SALMON – 231 CALORIES, 4G FAT

5. SASHIMI – 33 CALORIES, 1G FAT

6. SHRIMP – 199 CALORIES, OG FAT

FOR DETAILS CLICK HERE:  http://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/meal-ideas/6-best-low-calorie-sushi-rolls

Many types of sushi ready to eat.
Image via Wikipedia

Here’s a breakdown from Men’s Health on the healthiest and unhealthiest sushi options:

Healthy Sushi

Brown rice
Brown rice is increasingly becoming an option on sushi menus. This deviation from traditional sushi comes with health benefits: Brown rice maintains many of the nutrients lost while processing white rice (iron, vitamins B1 and B3, and magnesium). The bran layer of brown rice grain contains the fiber that lowers cholesterol and helps in keeping you regular. The fact that brown rice takes longer to break down in the body means it has a lower glycemic index, so it stabilizes and maintains blood glucose levels instead of causing rapid spikes.

Nori

The brown rice in sushi will still be wrapped in nori, the black layer that keeps sushi rolls together. Nori is dried seaweed and contains a dictionary’s worth of health benefits: It’s high in many vitamins and minerals including iodine; zinc; calcium; vitamins A, E, C, and K; fiber; and protein.

Wasabi
For those who like spice, wasabi is a healthy sushi condiment. This hot green paste is Japanese horseradish and is usually served alongside sashimi. It is a smart pairing because wasabi may help protect you from food poisoning due to its antimicrobial properties. It may prevent platelets from forming blood clots, asthma and cavities, but contrary to popular belief, it doesn’t “clear the sinuses.”

Ginger
A healthy sushi ingredient that does relieve sinus congestion is ginger. Served in a pickled form, it’s used to cleanse the palate after each piece of sushi. Ginger contains the compounds gingerols and shogaols. These oils stimulate digestive juices and neutralize stomach acids, which is definitely a plus when you ingest raw fish. Maybe you’ve had to fetch a ginger ale for your partner suffering from morning sickness, and that’s because Japanese researchers have found that ginger may be responsible for blocking the body’s reflex to vomit. Ginger can also lower cholesterol levels and limit blood clots in the same way aspirin works in the body.

Mackerel
Of all the raw fish you could eat, mackerel sashimi is a healthy sushi choice. Mackerel is packed with omega-3 fatty acids. The small size of the fish means it’s low in mercury. It is also a high-protein fish; there are 25 grams of protein in a 4-ounce serving, and only 160 calories. This healthy sushi choice also contains selenium, which works along with omega-3s to neutralize free radicals.

Unhealthy Sushi

Bluefin tuna
Deep red bluefin tuna is a popular sushi ingredient, but unfortunately it’s one of the unhealthiest fish to eat, raw or otherwise. It has among the highest mercury contents, not to mention chemical PCBs. Eating bluefin tuna is also bad for the environment: Due to overfishing, bluefin is now being replaced on many sushi menus with more common (and inexpensive) yellowfin or albacore tuna.

Tobiko sushi
Tobiko sushi is made full of eggs — fish roe and quail eggs. Those quail eggs, however, are an unhealthy sushi choice. Similar to chicken eggs, quail eggs are high in cholesterol and saturated fat. There is also the risk of salmonella poisoning since the eggs are eaten raw. There is folate in quail eggs, but that won’t do you any good if you get sick.

Tempura
Lovers of deep-fried goodies live by the motto, “if it aint fried, it aint food.” Tempura is the usual sushi menu choice for those averse to raw fish. Both seafood and veggies can be served with tempura, meaning deep-fried in tempura batter. The batter consists of water, flour and eggs. Frying anything raises the total calorie and total fat content.

Soy sauce
Soy sauce is a high-sodium condiment served with sushi, making it an unhealthy sushi ingredient. Anyone with high blood pressure or following a low-sodium diet should not eat soy sauce. Despite the fact that it’s made from soy beans, the sauce does not contain soy isoflavones and has negligible amounts of vitamins and minerals, except sodium (Na+). One tablespoon of soy sauce has 1,006 milligrams of sodium — nearly half the recommended daily value.

sushi sensibility

The next time you head out for sushi, don’t assume you’re doing your body a favor. Although Japanese cuisine is among the healthiest in the world, Western preferences have added all sorts of unhealthy elements to sushi (cream cheese, anyone?), and some of sushi’s most innocent-seeming ingredients, like tuna, can take their toll on you if ingested in large quantities. Remember that the more veggies in your sushi, the better off you’ll be, and when in doubt, order the mackerel, and load up on the wasabi.

Link: http://www.askmen.com/sports/foodcourt_250/259b_healthy-unhealthy-sushi-ingredients.html#ixzz1mgwj2VTV

Registered dietitian Zannat Reza says sushi, like any meal, can be healthy if you choose wisely. Here are some of her Sushi eating tips:

• Many rolls are low in protein, which may bring on hunger pains two hours after eating. Reza suggests augmenting your sushi roll with a small, plain latte or a small yogurt.

• Look for sushi made with minimal ingredients and be wary of the rolls with the yummy extras, such as mayonnaise, barbecue sauce and tempura. These, of course, add extra fat and sodium to the meal.Women who are pregnant and who are breastfeeding and young children should avoid fish high in mercury, including tuna, king mackerel and orange roughy.

• Like all takeout food, sushi can sometimes be high in sodium. Reza points out that even the otherwise healthy brown rice California roll has 750 mg of sodium, about half of what your body needs in a day.

• Soy sauce is laced with sodium. One tablespoon contains about 1,000 mg of sodium, so Reza suggests going light on the soy or skipping it all together.Verdict: Sushi can be a diet delight or a diet disaster — depending on what you pick.

Brown rice California roll

This is the classic Cali roll — that’s imitation crab, rolled with avocado and cucumber and sprinkled with sesame seeds — made with nutty brown rice.  SERVING SIZE 9 pieces CALORIES 310 FAT 6 grams SODIUM 740 mg PROTEIN 7 grams CARBOHYDRATES 58 grams (4 grams fibre)

Verdict: Reza likes this roll’s calorie content and its dose of heart healthy avocado and fibre-rich, whole grain brown rice.

The veggie version — carrots replace the ‘crab’ — also gets two thumbs up. The roll contains similar amounts of calories, fat, protein and fibre, but has 240 mg less sodium. Multi-grain salmon avocado rollPink pieces of salmon and wedges of avocado rolled in nori and multi-grain rice.  SERVING SIZE 9 pieces CALORIES 330FAT 7 grams SODIUM 520 mg PROTEIN 15 grams CARBOHYDRATES 51 grams (7 grams fibre) 

Verdict: This is superhealthy sushi. Reza notes the 15 grams of hunger-busting protein is higher than most other rolls, while the 520 mg sodium is lower than many rolls. The avocado and salmon also make it a heart health booster, while the addition of multi-grain rice — and with seven different kinds of grain, including rye berries, purple barley and black japonica rice, it is truly multi-grain — adds an impressive 7 grams of fibre.

Volcano roll.  For those unfamiliar, this is a roll of cucumber, avocado and cream cheese topped with, among other things, spicy tuna, panko and two kinds of mayo. SERVING SIZE 5 piecesCALORIES 560FAT 29 gramsSODIUM 810 mgPROTEIN 16 grams CARBOHYDRATES 60 grams (3 grams fibre)

Verdict: This is sushi at its most decadent. Five bites of food contain one quarter of your daily calories, half the sodium your body needs in a day and more fat than two large chocolate sundaes from Dairy Queen. Yikes.

Chicken udon soup Pieces of chicken and thick udon noodles float in a savory broth with baby bok choy, broccoli, carrot and seaweed. SERVING SIZE 1 bowl, about 200 grams CALORIES 250FAT 1 gramSODIUM 5,970 mgPROTEIN 14 gramsCARBOHYDRATES 15 grams (1 gram fibre)

Verdict: By looking at the ingredient list, the soup’s minimal calories and fat and its 14 grams of belly filling protein, you would probably guess this is a comforting and healthy meal. Unfortunately, the 5,970 mg of sodium quickly renders this meal a dietary danger. The salt-soaked soup — the equivalent of 150 shakes with the salt shaker! — has four times more sodium than your body needs in a day.

RECOMMENDED DAILY ALLOWANCE

Men/Women Calories: 2,500/2,000 Fat: 60 to 105 grams/45 to 75 grams Sodium: 1,500 to 2,300 mg Carbohydrates: 281-325 grams

(Souce: The Dish, Megan Ogilvie)

 

Sushi Deluxe at Sushi Ten
Image via Wikipedia