Protect Your Health in Freezing Temps

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Actions to protect your health in freezing temperatures include:    

Preparing your family and home:

•Replenish your emergency supply kits including battery-operated radio and flashlights.

•Have extra blankets on hand.

 
•Clear rain gutters, repair roof leaks and cut away tree branches that could fall on a house or other structure during a storm.

•Check on family members and neighbors who are elderly or have special needs.

•Move family pets indoors or to an enclosure out of the elements.

•Maintain a sufficient supply of heating fuel.

•Insulate pipes and allow faucets to drip during cold weather to avoid freezing.

•Learn how to shut off water valves (in case a pipe bursts).

 
•Keep fire extinguishers on hand. Make sure everyone in your house knows how to use them.

•Do not bring heating devices, barbecues and other cooking equipment or other fuel burning devices intended for outdoors inside.

Stay Hydrated

Drink lots of water, even if you’re not thirsty.

Avoid alcohol, which makes your body lose heat.

Eat Light

Light meals are best before heading out in the cold.

Heavy meals require a large blood flow to the gastrointestinal system to aid in digestion, which may prevent warm blood from circulating to your fingers and toes.

Save the heavier meal for when you are back indoors.

Bundle Up

•Wear several layers of loose fitting, lightweight, warm clothing.

The outer garments should be tightly woven and water repellent.

Wear mittens, which are warmer than gloves.

•Wear a hat. 50% of heat is lost from your head. 

Wear warm socks.

Outer shell of your layered clothing should shield wind.

Protect your lips with lip balm and any exposed skin with moisturizer.

Cover your mouth with a scarf to protect your lungs.

Exercise Indoors

Maintain your exercise routine by doing so indoors

Recognizing symptoms of cold weather exposure

Confusion, dizziness, exhaustion and shivering are signs of possible hypothermia.

If you experience any of these symptoms, seek medical attention immediately.

 
Gray, white or yellow skin discoloration, numbness or waxy skin are symptoms of frostbite.  See a physician.

 
In the case of overexposure to severe temps, remove wet clothes an warm the body with a blanket or warm fluids.

During a storm

Drive only if it is absolutely necessary. 

Keep warm blankets, extra clothing, hats, scarves, gloves and healthy snacks in  your car during severe temperatures.

If you must drive: travel in day; don’t travel alone; let others know your schedule; stay on main roads; avoid back road shortcuts.

Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive.

If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.

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For more information visit:
Extreme Cold: A Prevention Guide to Promote Your Personal Health and Safety – (CDC)

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Cold Weather Survival Guide from NJ.com  http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2013/01/cold_weather_survival_guide_wh.html

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7 Top Health Risks for Men Over 40

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By Guest Author, , Caring.com senior editor

During midlife and beyond, men’s leading causes of death include familiar standbys: heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, stroke, diabetes, respiratory disease, suicide, and Alzheimer’s disease.  To lessen your odds of dying from these killers, curb the critical habits that lead to them:

1.  Risk: Being single

Numerous surveys have shown that married men, especially men in their 50s, 60s, and 70s, are healthier and have lower death rates than those who never married or who are divorced or widowed.

Never-married men are three times more likely to die of cardiovascular disease, for example. After 50, divorced men’s health deteriorates rapidly compared to married men’s, found a RAND Center for the Study of Aging report.

What’s the magic in the ring? The social connectedness of marriage may lower stress levels and depression, which lead to chronic illness. (Women tend to have more social ties outside of marriage.)

Oops: Unmarried men generally have poorer health habits, too — they drink more, eat worse, get less medical care, and engage in more risky behaviors (think drugs and promiscuous sex).  Exception: It’s better to be single than in a strained relationship, probably because of the stress toll, say researchers in Student BMJ.

Silver lining: It’s never too late. Men who marry after 25 tend to live longer than those who wed young. And the longer a fellow stays married, the greater the boost to his well-being.

2.  Risk: Electronic overload

Psychologists are debating whether “Internet addiction disorder” is a legitimate diagnosis, and how much is too much, given how ubiquitous screens are in our lives. But one thing’s certain: The more time that’s spent looking at wide-screen TVs, smartphones, tablets, gaming systems, laptops, and other electronics, the less time that’s spent on more healthful pursuits, like moving your body, communing with nature, and interacting with human beings.

Social isolation raises the risk of depression and dementia. And a sedentary lifestyle — a.k.a. “sitting disease” — has been linked to heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and premature death. A 2012 Australian study of more than 220,000 adults ages 45 and up linked sitting for 11 or more hours a day with a 40 percent increased risk of death over the next three years.

Oops: Americans spend five hours in front of the TV every day, according to a 2011 JAMA study that didn’t even take all those other screens into account. More than just three hours a day ups your odds of dying of any chronic disease.

Silver lining: The Australian researchers say that getting up and moving even five minutes per hour is a “feasible goal . . . and offers many health benefits.”

3. Risk: Sloppy sunscreen use

Men over age 40 have the highest exposure to damaging UV rays, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. Men are twice as likely as women to develop skin cancer and die from it. And 6 in 10 cases of melanoma, the deadliest skin cancer, affect white men over age 50.

More men tend to work and play sports outdoors; having shorter hair and not wearing makeup adds to the gender’s exposure. Nor are their malignancies noticed and treated early: Middle-aged and older men are the least likely group to perform self-exams or see a dermatologist, according to a 2001 American Academy of Dermatology study.

Oops: Fewer than half of adult men report using sun protection methods (sunscreen, protective clothing, shade), in contrast to 65 percent of adult women.

Silver lining: Doctors tend to detect more early melanomas in men over 65, perhaps because the older you get, the more often you see a doctor for other (nondermatological) reasons.

4. Risk: Crummy diet

Poor nutrition is linked with heart disease, diabetes, and cancer — leading causes of death in men over 40. Younger midlife men often over-rely on red meat, junk food, and fast food to fuel a busy lifestyle, which leads to excess weight, high cholesterol, hypertension, and other risk factors. Older men living alone and alcoholics are vulnerable to malnutrition, because they tend not to prepare healthy food for themselves.

Oops: Until around 2000, more women were obese than men — but guys are catching up. In 2010, 35.5 percent of men were obese, up from 27.5 percent in 2000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Women’s fat rates have held steady at around 37 percent.)

Silver lining: The American Dietetic Association recommends a reasonable 2,000 calories a day for men over 50 who are sedentary, up to 2,400 for those who are active. What comprises those calories is up to you.

5. Risk: Careless driving

Men generally have more car accidents than women, and men in their 50s and 60s are twice as likely as women to die in car wrecks. Unintentional injuries (of all kinds) are the top cause of death among men ages 40 to 44, the third main cause in men ages 45 to 64, and cause #8 in men 65-plus.

Oops: Among middle-aged men, fatalities are more likely to result from falling asleep at the wheel, exceeding the speed limit, getting into an accident at an intersection or on weekends after midnight — all factors that don’t have a significant effect on the injury levels of middle-aged women, according to a 2007 Purdue University study on how age and gender affect driving. Men over age 45 have more accidents on snow and ice, too.

Silver lining: Older men fare better than men under age 45 on dry roads, where younger drivers crash more (perhaps due to overconfidence, the Purdue researchers say).

6. Risk: Untreated depression

Although women are three times more likely to attempt suicide than men, men are more successful at it, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. In 2009, 79 percent of all suicides were men. Suicide rates for men spike after age 65; seven times more men over 65 commit suicide than their female peers.

More than 60 percent of all those who die by suicide have major depression. If you include alcoholics, that number rises to 75 percent. In older adults, social isolation is another key contributing factor — which is why older suicides are often widowers.

Oops: Men often equate depression with “sadness” or other emotions — and fail to realize that common warning signs of depression include fatigue or excessive sleep, agitation and restlessness, trouble concentrating, irritability, and changes in appetite or sleep.

Silver lining: Depression is treatable at any age, and most cases are responsive to treatment, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

7.  Risk: Smoking

Sure, you’ve heard about the horrific effects of smoking before. But the older you get, the worse they become. Older smokers have sustained greater lung damage over time because they tend to have been smoking longer; they also tend to be heavier smokers.

Men over 65 who smoke are twice as likely to die of stroke. Smoking causes more than 90 percent of all cases of COPD — the fourth leading cause of death among men — and 80 to 90 percent of all lung cancer. The risks of all kinds of lung disease rise with age. Smokers develop Alzheimer’s disease, the sixth leading cause of death, far more than nonsmokers.

Oops: Older smokers are less likely than younger smokers to believe there’s a real health risk attached to cigarettes, says the American Lung Association. That means they’re less likely to try to quit.

Silver lining: No matter at what age you quit, your risk of added heart damage is halved after one year. The risks of stroke, lung disease, and cancer also drop immediately.

For More Information, please visit: www.caring.com

RECAP:  7 TOP HEALTH RISKS FOR MEN OVER 40:

1.  BEING SINGLE

2.  ELECTRONIC OVERLOAD

3. SLOPPY SUNSCREEN

4. CRUMMY DIET

5. CARELESS DRIVING

6. UNTREATED DEPRESSION

7.  SMOKING

Best: Top 10 Heart Hospitals

 

U.S. News and World Report’s Top 10 Hospitals for Cardiology and Heart Surgery:

  1. Cleveland Clinic
  2. Mayo Clinic
  3. Johns Hopkins
  4. Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital  (St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System)
  5. Massachusetts General Hospital
  6. New York Presbyterian Hospital of Columbia and Cornell
  7. Duke University Medical Center
  8. Brigham and Women’s
  9. Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center
  10. Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

1.  Adopt a heart healthy diet

2.  Know your family medical history

3.  Undergo preventive screenings

4.  Stop smoking

5.  Relax

6.  Lower your blood pressure

7.  Lower you cholesterol

8.  Baby aspirin

9.  Sleep

10. Exercise

See more: http://health.howstuffworks.com/diseases-conditions/cardiovascular/heart/10-ways-to-avoid-heart-attack1.htm

According to Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics — 2012 Update, published in Circulation, half of U.S. kids meet just four or fewer of the health criteria to be heart healthy.

In high school, 30 percent of girls and 17 percent of boys do not get the recommended 60 minutes a day of physical activity, the report noted.  That makes me wonder if Physical Education (gym class) was cut out of budgets.

In addition, a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that one in five children had abnormal cholesterol levels, which prompted the American Academy of Pediatrics to issue new guidelines recommending that all children 9 to 11 years old be screened for high cholesterol levels.

Children 9 to 11?  Better educate yourself now on how to lower cholesterol naturally.  Eliminate sugars and sodas.  If your kids are hooked, make it a game.  Go grocery shopping to find something they like that is healthy that can replace it.  See the following links for more natural ways to lower cholesterol.

From Mike Adams, Natural News.  

“The key is that you have to be doing something physical each and every day, and you have to stick with it for the rest of your life. The only way to have healthy cholesterol levels is to engage in regular physical exercise.

There is no way around it! No prescription drug will give you the same benefit, and there’s no nutritional supplement that takes the place of physical exercise. The human body was meant to be moved, and if you want yours to be healthy, you’ve got to move it.

Besides exercise, I’ve also completely eliminated all processed foods and junk foods from my diet.

I eat no manufactured foods whatsoever, that is, no breads, no packaged cereals, no frozen foods, no fried foods, no junk foods, and certainly no candy bars, breads, crackers, cookies, pastas or anything of that sort.

I also avoid cow’s milk, and I wouldn’t touch red meat if you paid me.

Red meat is one of those foods that tends to give people very bad cholesterol numbers. It raises their LDL cholesterol and gives them a heavy dose of saturated animal fat.

I also avoid all chemical ingredients that are known to promote disease… these ingredients include MSG, sodium nitrite, chemical sweeteners such as aspartame, and of course artificial colors.

I drink no soft drinks whatsoever, no milk and no fruit juices. The only things I drink are water, soy milk and unsweetened tea.

In addition to avoiding certain foods, I also supplement my diet with a wide array of superfoods, medicinal herbs, vitamins, minerals and nutritional supplements.

My favorites are chlorella, spirulina, broccoli sprouts, quinoa,sea vegetables, soy products, and any of the green food powders or fresh vegetables. This is where I get my outstanding nutrition that I firmly believe plays a huge role in my ability to produce outstanding cholesterol numbers.

In addition to all this, I make sure I get plenty of fiber in my diet, and I eat a lot of macadamia nuts, pecans, peanuts, cashews and other nuts. I frequently supplement with flaxseed oil, extra virgin coconut oil and olive oil

Some of the other things I do, from a nutritional standpoint, are eating aloe vera gel, and eating no corn oil or other low-grade oils. I avoid all hydrogenated oils, and I eat at least one extremely large salad every day. Some days I eat two large salads.

I also supplement with rice protein, soy protein, psyllium husk fiber, and superfood products like Berry Green and The Ultimate Meal. There’s no question in my mind that a person who does all of these things will achieve similar numbers to the ones I’m demonstrating here.

You don’t have to hit a ratio of 1.08 to be extremely healthy. In fact, if you can get your ratio down to 3, your doctor will be quite pleased at your progress.

You don’t have to change everything in your life all at once in order to do this, you just have to take small incremental steps and make them part of your daily habits.

For example, you could start walking every day, beginning tomorrow.  You could walk 30 minutes a day and then increase it gradually until you’re walking one hour a day.

You could start avoiding certain foods in your diet, such as red meat, soft drinks, cow’s milk or anything containing hydrogenated oils. Be sure to check the ingredient to find out which foods contain hydrogenated oils.”


Learn more at:http://www.naturalnews.com/002692.html#ixzz1txeRZnDg

Free Documentary Screening:
Stay healthy!

“Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.” (Matthew 5:8)

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Obesity or Greed Epidemic? by Maria Dorfner

Today, as some docs want to regulate toxic sugar I’m reminded of a blog I wrote on this day in ’05:

June 4, 2005 – Every day we are bombarded with media messages about the “obesity epidemic“.  The AP puts a new story on its wires and TV news writers end up rewriting the wire copy for broadcast, so the propaganda ends up in our living rooms.

Who is distributing the Press Release? What is their motive? What have they got to gain by scaring the public into believing we’ve all got one foot in the grave? Turns out, a lot of folks have a lot of money to gain.

In 1988, the World Health Organization (WHO), officially declared obesity a disease. You can’t declare something a disease unless it’s widespread and statistics back it up. Recently, we have seen how the Centers of Disease Control (CDC) admitted inflating those numbers. The CDC was able to receive about $40 million dollars a year allocated towards obesity based on their previous numbers.

In 1993, a study by McGinnis & William Foege, M.D. published in JAMA estimated that the most prominent contributors to mortality in the U.S. were, in order, tobacco, diet and activity patterns, alcohol, microbial agents, toxic agents and firearms with “dietary patterns and sedentary lifestyle being the most common source of unnecessary death and disease among Americans“.

That was 19 years ago, yet we keep getting told the same information as if it’s new.

 

They want us to believe that obesity has surpassed tobacco deaths. Maybe the people who quit smoking started eating.  Although, the alarming number of deaths due to obesity that Foege quoted back then were the same wrong numbers derived from the CDC. 

Obesity programs are funded primarily by the National Center for Chronic Disease and Prevention. There’s that word “disease” again. The budget? $747,472,000.

Turns out, a lot of folks want to get their hands on that money under the guise of conducting “obesity research”. The Medicaid Obesity Treatment Act of ’01 required medicare prescription drug coverage to cover drugs medically necessary to cover obesity.

By declaring obesity a disease many unhealthy strategies for weight loss (stomach stapling, liposuction, diet pills, body wraps, herbal remedies, etc.) might become warranted. Doctors could justifiably use these treatments and feel confident that they are improving the client’s health simply by decreasing his or her weight.


Pharmaceutical companies would be able to market their quick fix pills and quacks could promote radical diets that promote fast weight loss. It must be emphasized that the effect of these treatments would only be temporary since they don’t address long-term behavior change, such as lifetime physical activity and improved dietary habits. In addition, even if weight loss is achieved and maintained there is no guarantee that it will be accompanied with health benefits.

It’s bureaucracy growing in inverse proportion to its effectiveness. It can justify more government taxing under the guise of “tax policy as a social engineering tool”. There are so many special interest groups that want us to buy into the obesity epidemic under their insatiable search for funding. When the truly obese do not respond to their efforts — then they go after the mainstream. More numbers enables them to justify their perpetual fundraising efforts.

The so-called obesity epidemic brings in revenue. In order for these organizations to keep the money rolling in they have to expand the nationwide guilt trip and falsify numbers. The motive is money. Plain and simple.

Foundations redirect their funding when a new disease pops up. Millions of dollars in grants have been awarded under the “obesity epidemic” war. There’s some obese person out there somewhere who seriously needs help and doesn’t have money, but that person probably never gets help.

If these foundations really want to help people, why not make the grant application open to the obese individuals instead of research institutions and organizations that keep getting grants merely to reinforce that a problem exists. That would cost less and help more.

Long-term diet and exercise modifications are the only effective lifestyle changes that affect obesity. It doesn’t take billions of dollars to make people aware of that. Yes, some people have a genetic predisposition towards obesity, but even they can make changes in their eating and activity level.

Stop lowering the threshold for who is considered obese, so that more and more people fall into a category so companies can sell more drugs to them. So far, adults, children, elderly and even newborn babies have been included in this ever-expanding “Greed” epidemic. 

A lot of wallets expand along with waistlines, and consumers need to be wary of studies and research reports that keep reinforcing the same ol’, same ‘ol with a new twist. The new twist is usually a result of some people sitting in a room saying, “We have to figure out to get more money” from this.

How does telling you you’re fat get them more money? Because then you go to the doctor and ask for help. He recommends drugs or surgery. Fast food? The government puts another “sin tax” on it. What’s next? A “sin tax” for computers and televisions because after all, they do contribute to inactivity. Let’s not forget the lawyers who benefitted from tobacco settlements who would love to go after another big industry as well.

[by Maria Dorfner, NewsMD Communications, originally posted on a blog Saturday, June 04, 2005 @ 7:45 PM

newsmdcommunications.blogspot.com/Cached]
 
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2012 UPDATE – 7 years later.  The headlines as predicted want to include MORE PEOPLE in this “epidemic”. More people. More money.   The headline should be:  Obe$ity Greed Epidemic Much Worse Than Americans Believe.

 

Study: American Obesity Epidemic Much Worse Than CDC Believes

The traditional measures of obesity are inadequate, according to a new report

April 2, 2012 RSS Feed Print

The American obesity epidemic might be much worse than many experts believe because of the limitations of the Body Mass Index, which is the most popular number used to diagnose the condition…

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Pets are included now. 

Statistics tell us there is no change in this epidemic.

A recent article I read by Pope in the New York Times backs this up.  It’s not because there are a lack of medications.  I begin to wonder if all these pills are merely placebos.  The side effects that kill tells me that’s not the case.  At least not in a few batches.

Here’s a link to all the pharmaceutical drugs available to treat obesity. http://www.drugs.com/condition/obesity.html

There is also an organization called Obesity in America.  The website is www.obesityinamerica.org.  It was created to educate, legislate and reverse obesity. It will also feed information to reporters. That’s enough sugar-coated sweetness to make one obese.

There are people who require medical intervention.  They need to be the focus here.   I cry if I watch The Biggest Loser.  I can feel their pain.  I often wonder why God didn’t create bodies that stayed exactly the same no matter how you eat.  Why do people have to suffer over how their bodies look or how they perceive their bodies to look?  Why is it so hard to lose and so easy to gain?

Being thin doesn’t make you immune to stress and challenges either.  It’s easy to blame extra weight for every problem in your life. When that extra weight is gone –it gets harder because when you discover the problems are still there you begin to feel even worse. Only now you can’t comfort yourself with ring dings.  It’s a vicious cycle.  You absolutely have to have new coping mechanisms and habits to deal with any triggers that made you reach for comfort food in the past. 

On “The Biggest Loser” people are led to believe that once they lose the weight, they will be happy.   Many of these people actually look into the camera and exclaim, “I’m SO happy now!”   Happiness doesn’t work like that.  You could be happy obese.  Obesity doesn’t make you unhappy.   Happiness does not rely on external factors.   Once you attach it to an external factor –it will crash because things do not stay the same. They change. Look at nature if you want to understand how this works.  If you can change, yet stay the same –you will be happy.   Your habits result from your beliefs. 

Establishing good habits from childhood is so important.  Habits are things we do automatically.  When I was a kid, we ran outside to play after school.  They will tell you being poor or being stressed will make you a fat kid. That is baloney. 

Bikeriding was big after school. So was jogging, touch football, tag or stoopball right on the steps. And I played tennis with Rob Bonomolo in grade school. We learned how from watching “Hart to Hart” on television. Jump rope was big after lunch in the lunchroom. Susan Favola, Lorelei Donofrio and I made sure to cover the entire alphabet while jumping.

What belief system did we have then? We associated being outdoors with freedom. Freedom from homework (presumably that was done before you ran outside), freedom from sitting in a stuffy classroom, freedom from work, freedom from carrying heavy books, freedom from wearing a uniform.

We could dump our way too heavy book bags, get into comfortable clothing and run free.

Think about that feeling. Close your eyes. Fresh air. Running. Not a worry in the world. We weren’t sitting staring at screens. We were active outdoors. Flying free. Like birds.

Wrong photo.  Those birds are sedentary.  You get the picture.   Visualize flying ones. 
If the economy were as it is right now when I was growing up and my Dad was out of a job –I would still run outside and play, even more.

You don’t need Big Brother telling you you have a disease and you’re part of an epidemic that is bigger than HIV (it’s not).

Maybe if the government focused on fixing the economy, as much as they focus on fixing your waistline, the stress would go away for the unemployed, underemployed, single mothers, single fathers, uninsured and kids.

It’s not an epidemic.  Thinking that releases the exact kind of stressful hormones  you don’t want in your body.  Remain calm.  It’s your private health. Take care of it one day at a time.  Make good choices.  Stay positive.   You are going to be okay.

It’s Not Your Grandmother’s Nursing Home: More Binge Drinkers than in College Dorms, CDC Study

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Credit: Corbis

Nursing homes may house more frequent binge drinkers than college dorms.

In addition to finding that binge drinking is bigger than previously thought, a CDC report shows that while most binge drinkers are college students, those who binge most often are over 65.

More than 50 percent of the consumed alcohol in the United States is drunk while binge drinking, researchers found. The report revealed other surprises:

  • The income bracket with the most binge drinkers is well off, with incomes over $75,000
  • The poorest income bracket (less than $25,000) drinks the most per binge
  • people who binge are not alcoholics

BLOG: Human Drinking May Damage Memory

The survey of 457,677 Americans asked both how often people engaged in binge drinking, and how many drinks they downed in a single session.

Binge drinking is most common in the Midwest, with Wisconsin adults who indulge in the practice topping the charts at 25.6 percent. It’s lowest in Utah, at 10.9 percent.

NEWS: Light Drinking Said OK for Pregnant Women

Make no mistake, however: college-age young adults still drink a lot: 28 percent of those ages 18 to 24 said they binged on alcohol four times a month, averaging 9.3 drinks per binge. And more than 90 percent of the alcohol youth drink occurs during binges.

SOURCE: DISCOVERY CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL (CDC) LINK:  http://www2c.cdc.gov/podcasts/player.asp?f=11158 

“People who binge drink are not alcoholics. Give it time. Binge eaters eventually got added to the spectrum of eating disorders. Just give it time, I say. And let’s hope there is always someone available, who hasn’t been binge drinking, to drive these individuals home.  Oh wait.  The ones in the Nursing Home ARE already home.  Come to think of it, so are the ones in Dorms.  O.K. Party on, then!!” ~Maria Dorfner