Study: Teens Teased About Weight More Likely To Become Obese Adults

If you think teasing your teen about their weight is helping them, think again. You may be doing more harm.  Harm that can last well into their adulthood having them turn to more food for comfort.

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Being a teen can be a challenging time for many children and for teens who are overweight or obese, the challenges can be even greater.

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A recent study shows that teens who are teased about their weight are more likely to become obese adults.

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Researchers asked nearly 2,000 school aged children about whether they had been teased by other children, or family members, about their weight.

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When they followed up with these children 15 years later, they found that those who answered ‘yes’ were more likely to be obese adults, struggle with body image and develop unhealthy eating behaviors.

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Leslie Heinberg, PhD, of Cleveland Clinic did not take part in the study, but says the results are a good indication that problems with weight-based teasing need to be addressed early on.

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“”One of the primary ways people cope with this bad experience is by eating – they fall back into comfort eating; they fall into disordered eating behaviors,”” says Dr. Heinberg. “

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“What this study shows, is some of the dieting behavior they utilize can be really unhealthy,”” says Dr. Heinberg.

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Dr. Heinberg says one of the most interesting findings was that girls who were teased about their weight by family members, rather than peers, had the most problems as adults dealing with weight control and emotional distress.

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“”Peers or family members, they might tease, or give somebody a hard time about their weight – maybe not with malicious intent – maybe they think, ‘oh, this will be good. It will motivate them to lose weight, it will motivate them to eat in a healthy manner,’ however, it’s actually more likely to derail them,”” says Dr. Heinberg.

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Dr. Heinberg says home needs to be a place where children feel safe from teasing.

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“The first goal is to make home a healthy and safe environment in which teens aren’’t feeling victimized about their weight, and giving them at least a safe spot at home where they don’’t have those experiences,” she says.

NATIONAL LAMPOON'S VACATION, Anthony Michael Hall, Chevy Chase, Beverly D'Angelo, Dana Barron, 1983

For parents who are concerned about their teen’s weight, Dr. Heinberg says it’s best to bring in a professional.

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She recommends having a conversation with the child’s pediatrician before they’re seen.

Doctor Giuseppe Morino measures Mirco Conti, a ten-year-old boy, at the "Bambin Gesu" paediatric hospital in Rome

They can tell you what a healthy weight is and develop appropriate strategies for addressing it.

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OBESITY MAY BE PREVENTED BY:

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

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GOOD NUTRITION
(AVOID SODA, FAST FOOD, PROCESSED FOODS AND JUNK FOOD)

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Teen Nutrition Meal Ideas at: http://www.stack.com/a/teenage-meal-plan

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LESS SCREEN TIME

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MORE SLEEP

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Stay healthy!

maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

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SOURCE: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743517301433

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Tea-rrific News

Anyone that knows me well knows I love my green tea.  I find it soothing and relaxing.  It’ my go-to beverage instead of coffee.

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Andrew E. Carol recently published a delightful report on the health benefits of drinking tea in the New York Times.

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Eleven studies with almost 23,000 people found for every 3 cups of green tea daily, risk of depression decreases 37%.

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That’s good news as the season changes and some people suffer from unexpected sadness.

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More cheerful news includes your risk of developing diabetes, stroke and other cardiovascular risk factors also decreases.

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And research says it’s good for your body too.  I don’t drink any soda or coffee, which I liken to pouring mud into an engine.

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My absolute personal favorite tea brand is YOGI tea.  I love it, and it comes in decaf and a variety of inspiring flavors.

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I also love that a different cute fortune is attached to the end of each tea bag.

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And I’m a fan of the company philosophy.

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The bright varying tea packages can also be organized by color in a kitchen drawer.

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If you have trouble sleeping you’ll love Yogi Bedtime for Sleep.

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Soon it’ll be time for a roaring fireplace, so enjoy your soothing tea time because “a relaxed mind is a creative mind.”

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Link to New York Time’s articlehttp://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/06/upshot/what-the-evidence-tells-us-about-tea.html

Link to Yogi Teahttp://www.yogiproducts.com

Stay healthy!  🙂

Maria

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Maria Dorfner is the founder of Healthy Within Network and owner of NewsMD Communications, LLC.  This is her blog. Contact: maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

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Must Read: 5 Hottest Tips to Prevent and Treat Cancer

If you read one article on cancer prevention and treatment prior to seeing a doctor, this is it.    -Maria Dorfner

 

About the Guest Author:  Gary Hyman, MD is Director at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine, The UltraWellness Center and The Institute for Functional Medicine

A Functional Medicine Approach to Cancer by Gary Hyman, MD

                                                                     

Functional medicine empowers patients and practitioners to achieve the highest expression of health by working collaboratively to address the root causes of disease. It is an emerging, personalized model of diagnosis and treatment that better addresses the need to prevent and manage chronic disease. In a word, it is the medicine of WHY, not WHAT.

Functional Medicine doctors are like soil farmers. They create a healthy soil, so pests can’t come and weeds can’t flourish. A healthy soil means disease can’t take hold.

So with cancer, a Functional Medicine practitioner would say that yes, we still need radiation and other conventional approaches, but what else can we do? How can we properly cultivate a healthy soil?

Cancer results because of in an imbalance in the system. So many people are walking around with tumors and don’t know it. We can do something to prevent them from growing by maintaining a healthy soil.

Instead of dividing everything into diseases and labels, emerging science points to a different way of thinking about diseases. Rather than divide the body into organs, Functional Medicine approaches disease as a systemic problem, and we have to treat the system, not the symptom; the cause, not the disease. This completely redefines the whole notion of disease. The landscape of illness is changing.

How we label cancer is no longer synced up with what we know about the origins of cancer or the fact that two people who have cancer with the same name—like breast cancer—can have two completely different diseases which require different treatments. Just because you know the name of your disease doesn’t mean you know what’s wrong with you or what to do about it.

Classifying tumors by body site — lung, liver, brain, breast, colon, etc. — misses the underlying causes, mechanisms, and pathways involved in a particular cancer. What’s more, it gives us no information about how it manifested in a given patient. Two people with cancers in different parts of the body may have developed it for the same reasons.

Similarly, two people with cancers in the same part of the body may have developed it for different reasons. A patient with prostate cancer and one with colon cancer may have more in common with each other than two patients who have colon cancer.

We need to look under the hood and find out what caused the illness to begin with.

Cultivating a Healthy Soil

Numerous things can contribute to cancer. Studies show diet, exercise, thoughts, feelings, and environmental toxins all influence the initiation, growth, and progression of cancer.

If a nutrient-poor diet full of sugar, lack of exercise, chronic stress, persistent pollutants, and heavy metals can cause cancer, could it be that a nutrient-dense, plant-based diet, physical activity,changing thoughts and reactions to stress, and detoxification might treat the garden in which cancer grows?

In other words, treat the soil, not the plant. It is a foundational principle of sustainable agriculture, and of sustainable health.

We can enhance immune function and surveillance through dietary and lifestyle changes, as well as nutrient and phytonutrient therapies. We can facilitate our body’s own detoxification system to promote the elimination of carcinogenic compounds. We can improve hormone metabolism and reduce the carcinogenic effects of too much insulin (more on that in a minute) from our high sugar and refined carbohydrate diet.

We can also alter how our genes are expressed by changing the inputs that control that expression: Diet, nutrients, phytonutrients, toxins, stress, and other sources of inflammation. And we can focus on less divisive and more generative thoughts that, in turn, create more uplifting emotions — all good fertilizer for the soil in the garden of our body.

The Number One Thing You Can Do to Prevent or Control Cancer

Diabesity, the continuum of health problems ranging from mild insulin resistance and overweight to obesity and diabetes, is the single biggest global health epidemic of our time. It is one of the leading causes of heart disease, dementia, cancer, and premature death in the world and is almost entirely caused by environmental and lifestyle factors.

This means that it is almost 100 percent preventable and curable.

Diabesity affects over 1.7 billion people worldwide. Scientists conservatively estimate it will affect one in two Americans by 2020; 90 percent of whom will not be diagnosed.

Obesity (almost always related to diabesity) is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States and around the world. The link between obesity and cancer is well documented and is driven by insulin resistance. Insulin, the fat storage hormone, also drives more inflammation, oxidative stress, and a myriad of downstream effects including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, low HDL, high triglycerides, poor sex drive, infertility, thickening of the blood, and increased risk of cancer, Alzheimer’s, and depression.

The best thing you can do to prevent or control cancer is to control insulin levels with a high-fiber diet rich in real, fresh, whole foods and minimize or eliminate sugary, processed, insulin-raising foods.

Dr. Dean Ornish showed that after just three months on an intensive lifestyle program including a whole-foods, plant-based diet, over 500 genes that regulate cancer were beneficially affected, either turning off the cancer-causing genes or turning on the cancer-protective genes. No medication can do that.

5 Strategies to Reduce Cancer Formation and Growth

Cancer results from an imbalance in our system where the immune system can’t fight off tumors. We can do many things to prevent that cancer from getting to its full stage, and if you have cancer, you can make your body inhospitable to that cancer.

1.

Eliminate food sensitivities. In a major study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, hidden gluten sensitivity was shown to increase risk of death by 35 to 75 percent, mostly by causing heart disease and cancer. By just this mechanism alone, more than 20 million Americans are at risk for heart attack, obesity, cancer, and death. Dairy and gluten are the most common triggers of food allergies that are linked to insulin resistance. Cutting them out of the diet allows the inflamed gut and an inflamed body to heal.

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Reduce inflammation. Inflammation is the common thread connecting most chronic disease including cancer. In fact, out-of-control inflammation causes insulin resistance, which, as we now know, is the main factor in all these diseases apart from autoimmunity and allergy. The insulin resistance then creates even more inflammation, and the whole biological house burns down. Besides removing sugar and food sensitivities like gluten and dairy, we want to eat plenty of anti-inflammatory foods, including omega-3 rich foods like wild fish and flaxseeds.

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Improve gut health. Cancer often originates in your gut. Not just colon cancer, but with many cancers. We are currently studying about the gut microbiome and breast and prostate cancers. Beyond avoiding inflammatory foods, adding in probiotics, prebiotics, and lots of phytonutrients, like curcumin (found in turmeric) and resveratrol (found in grapes), can reduce gut-based inflammation.

4.

Reduce toxic exposure. The average newborn has 287 chemicals in her umbilical cord blood, 217 of which are neurotoxic (poisonous to nerves or nerve cells). The chemicals these infants are exposed to include pesticides, phthalates, bisphenol A, flame retardants, and heavy metals such as mercury, lead, and arsenic. These chemicals have a broad range of negative effects on human biology; they damage the nervous system and increase the risk of cancer, and now they have been shown to contribute to obesity. Going clean and green means becoming more aware about how environmental toxins affect your health. I encourage you to visit the Environmental Working Group (EWG) to learn more.

5.

Change your thoughts to change your immune system. Science is now proving what we all knew intuitively — that how we live, the quality of our relationships, the food we eat, and how we use our bodies determines much more than our genes ever will. There are numerous strategies to combat or prevent cancer, including getting sufficient sleep, controlling stress levels, and exercising regularly.

The important thing is to figure out what works for you and develop a plan to stick with it. That might involve working with a Functional Medicine doctor or a chronic disease specialist.

Conclusion

Whether you have been diagnosed with cancer or have become concerned about family and friends being diagnosed, the most important thing is mindset and not playing into fear.

While we all hope there will one day be a miracle cure for cancer, there are things that we know now will combat cancer or keep our quality of life high while our body is fighting the cancer.

The science of cancer genetics is changing. Two people who have the same cancer could be completely different in terms of how the cancer performs. That’s why I’m very excited about the work that Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong is doing in California on the cancer genome and creating targeted therapies to treat the cancer in every patient individually. This and other emerging technologies, combined with the Functional Medicine approach to cancer, give me great hope about our ability to further prevent and treat this disease in the future.

I encourage you to think about cancer differently and more importantly, not lose hope.

Stay healthy, everyone! -Maria

MARIADORFNERBLACKANDWHITEHEADSHOT    Maria Dorfner (formerly Pallante Bianco) is the founder of MedCrunch, covering What’s Hot in Health.

At 24, she helped launch CNBC after working full-time at NBC for two years and part-time throughout college. She then joined Ailes Communications as director of research and producer for TV pilots successfully syndicated. She then co-anchored and senior produced several health series airing on CNBC for three years. She wrote, produced and directed medical documentaries for Discovery Health Channel and helped launch the Cleveland Clinic News Service.  She is the owner of NewsMD Communications, a full-service production company specializing in health content and distribution. She is the author of three books.  Her awards include an Outstanding Leadership Abilities and Commitment to the Advancement of Women in Media award from her alma mater and a Media Recognition Award from the American Heart Association for her “Heart Smart” series and a Medical Reporting Scholarship. Maria is in Who’s Who in American Women, 22nd edition, 2000/2001.  She is a native of Brooklyn, New York.  Her health blog is a division of Healthy Within Network, which is her existing labor of love.  It connects the dots in medicine, media and marketing.  Contact:  maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

Cynthia’s Story: Helping Women Who Live with Chronic Pain

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Cynthia Toussiant is a former ballerina and actress (FAME) who has suffered with chronic pain disorder for more than thirty years.

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The strong, graceful ballerina’s life changed when a minor ballet injury triggered chronic pain.

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The chronic pain left the strong and graceful ballerina mute and in a wheelchair for years.

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She visited countless physicians and was continually told it was all in her head.

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Her husband, John Garrett, who has been with her for 34 years helped her get to the bottom of it.

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Turns out, Cynthia had Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) for 32 years. She later developed Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

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I talk to Cynthia and John about it: https://www.hightail.com/download/UlRUTGs2bEpLVldjZDhUQw

WHAT IS COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME?

According to the Mayo Clinic, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is an uncommon form of chronic pain that usually affects an arm or a leg. Complex regional pain syndrome typically develops after an injury, surgery, stroke or heart attack, but the pain is out of proportion to the severity of the initial injury.

WHAT CAUSES IT?

The cause of complex regional pain syndrome isn’t clearly understood. Treatment for complex regional pain syndrome is most effective when started early. In such cases, improvement and even remission are possible.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Signs and symptoms of complex regional pain syndrome include:
•Continuous burning or throbbing pain, usually in your arm, leg, hand or foot
•Sensitivity to touch or cold
•Swelling of the painful area
•Changes in skin temperature — at times your skin may be sweaty; at other times it may be cold
•Changes in skin color, which can range from white and mottled to red or blue
•Changes in skin texture, which may become tender, thin or shiny in the affected area
•Changes in hair and nail growth
•Joint stiffness, swelling and damage
•Muscle spasms, weakness and loss (atrophy)
•Decreased ability to move the affected body part

Symptoms may change over time and vary from person to person. Most commonly, pain, swelling, redness, noticeable changes in temperature and hypersensitivity (particularly to cold and touch) occur first.

Over time, the affected limb can become cold and pale and undergo skin and nail changes as well as muscle spasms and tightening. Once these changes occur, the condition is often irreversible.

Complex regional pain syndrome occasionally may spread from its source to elsewhere in your body, such as the opposite limb. The pain may be worsened by emotional stress.

In some people, signs and symptoms of complex regional pain syndrome go away on their own. In others, signs and symptoms may persist for months to years. Treatment is likely to be most effective when started early in the course of the illness.

WHEN SHOULD SOMEONE SEE A DOCTOR?

If you experience constant, severe pain that affects a limb and makes touching or moving that limb seem intolerable, see your doctor to determine the cause. It’s important to treat complex regional pain syndrome early.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT THE MAYO CLINC AT: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/complex-regional-pain-syndrome/basics/definition/con-20022844


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Once Cynthia and John learned more about it, they rechanneled their efforts to help other women.

HELPING OTHER WOMEN

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Since 1997, she has been a leading advocate for women in pain. Cynthia gave testimony at two California Senate hearings. The first was dedicated to CRPS awareness. The second explored the chronic under treatment of and gender bias toward women in pain. Both of these efforts were the first of their kind in the nation.

Cynthia founded For Grace to raise awareness about CRPS and all women in pain.

In 2006, Toussaint ran for the California State Assembly to bring attention to her CRPS Education Bill that Governor Schwarzenegger vetoed after she got it to his desk in its first year. Her current Step Therapy bill will reform an unethical prescription practice used by the health insurance industry to save money in a way that increases the suffering of California pain patients.

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Toussaint was the first CRPS sufferer to be featured in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and on the Public Broadcasting System and National Public Radio. She is a consultant for The Discovery Channel, ABC News, FOX News, the National Pain Report and PainPathways, the official magazine of the World Institute of Pain. Also, she is a guide and guest contributor for Maria Shriver’s Architects of Change website. Her many speaking engagements include the National Institutes of Health and Capitol Hill.

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She is the author of Battle for Grace: A Memoir of Pain, Redemption and Impossible Love. Also, Toussaint is experiencing her first-ever partial CRPS remission largely due to the narrative therapy of writing this book.

Toussaint continues to be a leading advocate for health care reform in California. She was instrumental in changing public opinion which sparked sweeping HMO reform legislation that was signed by Governor Gray Davis in 1999. Her focus has now shifted to creating a single-payer, universal health care plan in California that would provide a model for the rest of the country.

Cynthia’s husband, John serves as Director at For Grace and was instrumental in launching the organization in April 2002 along with his partner Cynthia Toussaint, who has suffered with CRPS (and later other over-lapping auto-immune conditions) for 32 years. Garrett has been partner and caregiver to Toussaint for 34 years. He has done extensive research about the gender disparity toward women in pain, compiling a comprehensive library on that issue along with specific chronic pain conditions.

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Garrett has assisted Toussaint in all aspects of media relations and advocacy regarding CRPS awareness and the pain gender divide. His work focuses on speech presentation, grant writing, research, media outreach and the development of branding strategies. Garrett has also advised California’s Department of Managed Health Care and other state agencies regarding pain management practices in the HMO industry.

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Commenting on her long-term partnership with Garrett, Toussaint says, “My story as a woman in pain is also a love story because John’s support has been total and unwavering. Without his loving presence in my life, I wouldn’t be here.”

Garrett made numerous writing contributions in Toussaint’s memoir, Battle for Grace: A Memoir of Pain, Redemption and Impossible Love. He candidly shares the virtues and challenges of the caregiving experience.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO FULL INTERVIEW with CYNTHIA & JOHN:

https://www.hightail.com/download/UlRUTGs2bEpLVldjZDhUQw

PHOTO MONTAGE OF CYNTHIA & JOHN:
https://www.hightail.com/download/UlRUeEVhbEpubVhSc01UQw

Elizabeth Taylor Quote on Living with Pain

Women with Chronic Pain, please visit:
WWW.FORGRACE.ORG

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7 Health Secrets by Maria Dorfner

Get a free copy of my new e-book, 7 HEALTH SECRETS in two easy steps.

  1. Write HEALTH in subject line to maria.dorfner(at)yahoo.com
  2.  Click the follow button after Follow This Blog below.

7 HEALTH SECRETS reveals my own quirky health habits and the products I love and use religiously. The question I get asked the most by family and friends is “How do you look so young…what’s your secret?”  I always say I don’t have any secret, but maybe there’s something I do that can help other people. I feel good when many people my age complain about aches and pains, so maybe I’m doing something right.  Young girls and women will benefit from reading it the most, but males can pick up tips from it too.  You’re only two steps away from getting your FREE COPY of 7 HEALTH SECRETS.

  1. Write HEALTH in subject line to maria.dorfner(at)yahoo.com
  2. Click the follow button after Follow This Blog below.

 

 

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5 Ways To Help Teens & Kids Cope Post Trauma

Today’s teens and kids are exposed to unpredictable adult-like stressors. 

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I spoke with Kate E. Eshleman, Psy.D., | Pediatric Psychologist| Pediatric Behavioral Health| Children’s Hospital, at Cleveland Clinic and contributing expert to MEDCRUNCH.

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She offers advice on how to help children and teens cope post trauma. 

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1. How can parents help children and teens after a traumatic event  , albeit a natural disaster or death?

There are many ways parents can help their children and teens cope. It is important for parents to make themselves available to their children, such that the kids can approach their parents if they are having any difficulties. It is appropriate for parents to check in and ask how their children are doing, but it is also important to be aware that not all children will want to talk or ask questions, and parents can take cues from their kids.

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If parents are observing that their children seem upset but are not wanting to discuss, they can try and engage them in distracting activities such as a family movie night, going on an outing (i.e., dinner or a fun activity), or every day errands such as to the grocery, anything to assist in getting the children’s minds off of what is bothering them.

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2. Does maintaining daily routines help, such as sitting down to dinner nightly?

Maintaining a routine is definitely important, as it assists in keeping some normalcy, even if things do not seem “normal.” Continuing to have the same expectation of the children’s behavior and activity is important, though if there are significant things going on, it may be okay to have a little more flexibility around those routines. Nightly, or at least regular, dinners are always important. This is a great opportunity to ask your children questions and/ or allow them to discuss their day. This will also be a good time for parents to observe/ assess for any changes in their children’s mood or behavior.

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3. What questions should parents ask children who seem withdrawn or anxious?

There are not necessarily specific questions that should be asked, but rather very general questions such as “how was your day?” or “anything on your mind?” More important than the specific question, is parents’ inquiring into how the child is doing, showing that they care and are interested in what the child is thinking/ feeling, and providing the opportunity for the child to discuss if (s)he is interested.

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 4. What healthy habits help? Should anything be increased/decreased during highly stressful times?

Healthy habits include eating well, getting rest, and being physically active. While these are relatively simple concepts, they are not always easy to implement, and can often be the first to go when times become busy and stressful. It may be helpful to prioritize what needs to be done and by when, and making sure to schedule in the healthy activities (i.e., finding a time to go to the grocery so there is food in the house, avoiding the need to stop and grab fast food on the way home, or planning to start a homework project on the weekend, so a child is not up late the night(s) before it is due). It is also important to maintain fun and enjoyable activities during stressful time, to provide a break from the stressors and an opportunity to relax and enjoy one’s self.

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5. Should parents share their own fears with kids or not?

 This one probably depends on several things. As a general rule of thumb, children should not have to worry about adult issues, as they are plenty busy worrying about kids’ issues. If it can be avoided, it is recommended that parents not openly discuss their concerns with or in front of the children. It is also important to note that children, beginning from an early age, take their cues from their parents, so even if parents are not verbalizing their thoughts and concerns, the children may be aware of what is going on, thus it is important for parents to monitor their own behavior and reactions. This being said, it is important for parents to tell their children the truth in a developmentally appropriate way, so if there is something happening that is directly affecting the children, it will be important for children to have some awareness of those things.

 

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Our heartfelt thoughts and prayers go out to those who lost loved ones in Oklahoma.

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Stay healthy & safe, everyone.

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Cleveland Clinic is ranked one of the top hospitals in America by U.S.News & World Report (2012). Visit them online at http://www.clevelandclinic.org for a complete listing of services, staff and locations.

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Lack of Sleep Dangerous for Young Drivers

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NPR recently reported that 4 in 10 teens admit to texting while driving.  And texting while driving replaced drunk driving as the number one cause of death among U.S. teens.

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Now, a new Australian study ties lack of sleep to higher risks of crashes among young drivers.

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Distracted AND Drowsy?  OH.  MY.

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Researchers at the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney surveyed more that 19,000 people between the ages of 17 and 24.

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They found those who were getting 6 or fewer hours  of sleep per night increased their risk for a crash compared to those getting MORE THAN 6 hours per night.

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But those who did not catch-up on the weekend increased their risk and were more likely to be involved in “run-off-road” crashes.

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RESULTS SHOW CRASHES INVOLVING YOUNG, DROWSY DRIVERS TYPICALLY OCCUR BETWEEN 8 P.M. AND 6 A.M.

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Researchers want to make young drivers aware of the importance of sleep and its affect when they’re behind the wheel.

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DR. HARNEET WALIA TREATS SLEEPS DISORDERS AT CLEVELAND CLINIC AND AGREES.

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CG: Dr. Harneet Walia/Cleveland Clinic
“Because the sleepiness can lead to attention lapses, impairment in concentration, impairment in judgment, slowed reaction time.“ 

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WALIA ADDS, “There has been a lot of data out there that reports people who sleep less are more likely to be involved with drowsy driving and drowsy driving is one of the top most causes of being involved in an accident.”

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COMPLETE FINDINGS FOR THIS STUDY ARE IN THE JOURNAL “JAMA PEDIATRICS”

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 [VT/VO on Pathfire #9141]

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Teens and Sleep from National Sleep Foundation

 
Sleep is food for the brain. During sleep, important body functions and brain activity occur. Skipping sleep can be harmful — even deadly, particularly if you are behind the wheel. You can look bad, you may feel moody, and you perform poorly. Sleepiness can make it hard to get along with your family and friends and hurt your scores on school exams, on the court or on the field. Remember: A brain that is hungry for sleep will get it, even when you don’t expect it. For example, drowsiness and falling asleep at the wheel cause more than 100,000 car crashes every year. When you do not get enough sleep, you are more likely to have an accident, injury and/or illness.
 
 
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WHY ARE TEENS SO TIRED? 

http://healthmagazine.ae/teen-sleep-why-is-your-teen-so-tired/

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NATIONAL TEEN DRIVING STATISTICS:

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety:

  • In 2010, the latest year for which data are available, motor vehicle crashes were the leading cause of death among 13-19 year-old males and females in the United States.

A total of 3,115 teenagers ages 13-19 died in motor vehicle crashes in 2010. This is 64 percent fewer than in 1975 and 10 percent fewer than in 2009.

  • Thirty-three percent of deaths among 13-19-year-olds occurred in motor vehicle crashes, 39 percent among females and 31 percent among males.
  • 16-year-olds have higher crash rates than drivers of any other age.
  • The crash rate per mile driven is twice as high for 16-year-olds as it is for 18- and 19-year-olds.
  • About 2 out of every 3 teenagers killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2010 were males.
  • In 2010, 58 percent of deaths among passenger vehicle occupants ages 16-19 were drivers.
  • Fifty-nine percent of teenage passenger deaths in 2010 occurred in vehicles driven by another teenager. Among deaths of passengers of all ages, 17 percent occurred when a teenager was driving.
  • Statistics show that 16- and 17-year-old driver death rates increase with each additional passenger.
  • Eighty-one percent of teenage motor vehicle crash deaths in 2010 were passenger vehicle occupants. The others were pedestrians (9 percent), motorcyclists (4 percent), bicyclists (2 percent), riders of all-terrain vehicles (2 percent), and people in other kinds of vehicles (2 percent).
  • Fifty-five percent of motor vehicle crash deaths among teenagers in 2010 occurred on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday.
  • In states with GDL programs that include at least five of the most important elements, there was a 20% reduction in fatal crashes involving 16-year-old drivers.
  • In 2006 (latest data available) crashes involving 15- to 17-year-olds cost more than $34 billion nationwide in medical treatment, property damage and other costs, according to an AAA analysis.
  • Teenage drivers and passengers are among those least likely to wear their seat belts.
  • In 2009, 11 percent of the people who died in distracted driving crashes were teens 15 to 19 years old. Out of all the teens who died in crashes in 2009, 18 percent died in crashes that involved distracted driving. Fifteen percent of teen drivers who were involved in fatal crashes were distracted at the time of the crash.
  • In 2008, 37 percent of male drivers ages 15-20 who were involved in fatal crashes were speeding at the time.
  • In 2010, 54 percent, or 1,532, of the 2,814 occupants of passenger vehicles age 16 to 20 who were killed in crashes were not buckled up.
  • Among fatally injured passenger vehicle drivers ages 16-17, 16 percent of males and 13 percent of females in 2010 had BACs at or above 0.08 percent. Among fatally injured drivers ages 18-19, 31 percent of males and 22 percent of females had BACs at or above 0.08 percent.

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Bottom Line for Young AND Old:

Be Well-Rested When You Get Behind-the-Wheel and Don’t Text & Drive!

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5 Hot Health Tips for Recent Grads by Maria Dorfner

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Tomorrow, my niece and Godchild, Lauren graduates from college. I am SO proud of her.

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 It seems like only yesterday I was holding her in my arms.  As she graduates with Honors from Saint John’s University and embarks into the real world, I’d like to share a few hot health tips. 

1.  DEFINE YOURSELF BY YOUR VALUES

  • Remember the most important word in the English language is no
  • No to drugs, violence, breaking the law, cheating, lying
  • No to racism, chauvenism, discrimination, unhealthy behaviors
  • No to too much alcohol, abuse or bullying
  • Values include Heath, Honesty/Truth, Integrity, Loyalty, Commitment/Followthrough
  • Values include Family, Spouse, Friends, Helping Others, Giving 100% at every job you do
  • Values like Excellence, Accountability (the list goes on). Your core values are who you are
  • You can’t control the world around you, but you can control how you react to it
  • When you are healthy, centered and balanced you will remain calm and make better decisions
  • When you feel angry or anxious, step away and breathe instead of reacting
  • Healthy coping mechanisms: Make yourself a cup of tea, go for a walk, or call a friend
  • Stand up for what you believe in because one person CAN make a difference
  • If someone is ever mean to you do not take it personal
  • Do not judge as they may be going through something that has nothing to do with you
  • Be patient, kind and do not react. Treat others as you wish  to be treated

2.  FEED YOUR MIND DAILY

  • Keep learning.  “Today a reader. Tomorrow a leader.”
  • Read Biographies of people you admire (you will learn how they overcame obstacles)
  • Read history, self-improvement and inspirational books
  • Read the news instead of watching it
  • Read healthy magazines instead of celebrity gossip or glamour mags
  • Snack on brain foods to keep your mind sharp (walnuts, almonds, veggies, fruits)  
  • Eating nutritious foods daily will keep your mind and body healthy, energetic and fit

3.  KEEP YOUR SPIRIT POSITIVE

  • Get outdoors in nature daily
  • Turn off the TV and all your gadgets to quiet your mind and the information overload
  • Surround yourself with healthy, positive people who motivate and inspire you
  • Close your eyes and meditate daily, even if it’s only 10 minutes
  • Avoid gossip or negative and toxic environments
  • Remember you are beautiful just the way you are
  • Laugh every single day; builds your immune system
  • Believe in yourself: You can do anything you set your mind to

4.  EXERCISE YOUR BODY DAILY

  • Walk at least 30 minutes  a day
  • Stretch upon rising each morning and before turning in each night
  • Stay hydrated with lots of water daily
  • Find a sport you enjoy that doesn’t feel like exercise (soccer, bowling, tennis, swimming)
  • Turn up the music to make the time pass quicker when you exercise
  • Strive to be healthy longterm instead of thin
  • Make rest a part of your daily healthy  habits; strive for 8 hours a night

5.  BE YOURSELF

  • Don’t ever compare yourself to others
  • Be the best version of you that you can be
  • Remember, no one else in the world is exactly like you; you ARE unique
  • Develop your unique skills by doing; if you don’t know what you’re good at –ask friends
  • Take your job seriously, but never yourself. Everyone makes mistakes, so learn to laugh
  • Don’t ever be afraid to talk to someone if you have questions about something
  • Appreciate and see all the goodness and beauty in life, even during bad times
  • Find mentors you admire.  You can learn a lot from people you respect

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Congrats to all 2013 Graduates & my wonderful, intelligent niece Lauren,  future ace accountant. 

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Remember, health is your greatest wealth. Make a deposit EVERY DAY!!!  🙂

 

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