Kaiser Leads Mobile Healthcare

Nearly 9 Million Kaiser Permanente Health Records Securely Available on Mobile Devices

Kaiser Permanente already has the largest electronic medical record system in the world.

The Pew Internet Project reported that 40 percent of American adults access the Internet via their mobile phones, and in some cases, mobile phones are their primary source of Internet access.

Twenty-five percent of smart-phone owners go online primarily using their phone; of these, roughly one-third have no high-speed home broadband connection.

Three months ago, the health care organization announced that 9 million Kaiser Permanente patients now can easily access their own medical information anywhere in the world on mobile devices through a mobile-optimized website.

An additional app for iPhone will be released in the coming months.  Meantime, iPhone users can download a shortcut icon to kp.org

In 2011 alone, more than 68 million lab test results were made available online to Kaiser Permanente patients.

Kaiser Permanente patients will have 24/7 access to lab results, diagnostic information…

direct and secure email access to their doctors, and will also be able to order prescription refills.

Kaiser Permanente had more than 12 million e-visits in 2011 alone, and they expect that number to rise.

The Android app is available now in the Android Market at no charge.

Users of other mobile devices can access the same set of care-support tools at no charge through the new secure, mobile-optimized member website, which is available through smart-phone Internet browsers.

Kaiser Permanente patients or family members who can act on their behalf, now have 24/7 access from their mobile devices to view their secure personal health record, email their doctors, schedule appointments, refill prescriptions and locate Kaiser medical facilities on kp.org

“This is the future of health care. Health care needs to be connected to be all that it can be. This new level of connectivity is happening real time, and it is happening on a larger scale than anything like it in the world,” said George Halvorson, chairman and chief executive officer of Kaiser Permanente.

“The fact that a Kaiser Permanente patient in an emergency room in Paris or Tokyo can simply pull out their mobile device and have immediate and current access to their own medical information is an evolutionary and revolutionary breakthrough for medical connectivity.”

“Our members love our current connectivity tools,” said Christine Paige, senior vice president of marketing and Internet services.

“Now we will extend our entire connectivity tool kit for patients through a mobile phone. Our mobile-optimized site and app take connectivity to the next level by making the mobile experience easy and enjoyable. We believe that convenience, paired with a great user experience, will meet members’ needs and will ultimately result in improved health and patient-physician relationships.”

iPHONE SHORTCUT ICON

  • Go to kp.org on your iPhone mobile Web browser
  • Click on the middle icon at the bottom of your screen
  • Choose “Add to Home Screen
  • A short cut will be added to your iPhone icons

Members using the Android app have access to their kp.org accounts by touching the app icon on their phones.

Those visiting kp.org from a mobile phone Internet browser are seamlessly redirected to the mobile-optimized website, which was designed for optimal viewing on a mobile-phone screen.

In both cases, a streamlined menu of mobile-optimized features helps members find what they need quickly and easily with minimal taps.

“Providing our patients with clear and convenient access to their health information is a step forward in connectivity and improving the health care experience for patients, no matter where they are,” saidJack Cochran, MD, executive director of The Permanente Federation.

“We already have complete connectivity among Kaiser Permanente care sites through Kaiser Permanente HealthConnect®. This new level of connectivity extends the reach of information to our patients in a more convenient and user-friendly format. This new app and mobile-optimized site is very good for patient care and will revolutionize connectivity by bringing health care for the first time to the level of connectivity other parts of our economy have achieved.”

Users’ personal health information is safe and secure while using the new app and the mobile-friendly kp.org, which employ the same security safeguards that protect patient information on the traditional kp.org website, including secure sign-on and automatic sign-out after a period of inactivity.

“The benefits of mobile extend beyond member engagement,” said Philip Fasano, executive vice president and chief information officer of Kaiser Permanente.

“Mobile solutions can have a positive impact on health. Health care, itself, will be much more convenient for many people. The mobile-friendly site and app are also a springboard for new innovations that will inspire members to be aware of their health and take steps to improve it.”

“There has been an explosion in the growth of mobile devices and users are looking for new and improved ways to manage their lives online,” Halvorson said.

“It is time to make health information easily accessible from mobile devices.”

This is a major new connectivity offering, but it is not Kaiser Permanente’s first mobile app. Other, more targeted tools, were released earlier. Kaiser Permanente launched its first mobile application, KP Locator for iPhone, in July 2011.

The facility-finder app has been downloaded 42,000 times.

KP Locator combines the power of kp.org’s robust facility directory and the iPhone’s GPS capabilities to make searching for Kaiser Permanente facilities fast and easy for patients on the go.

It answers three of the most basic, but vital, user questions thoroughly and simply — where are the Kaiser Permanente locations close to me, how can I contact and get to them, and what departments and services can I access there? Kaiser Permanente also released its Every Body Walk! app two months ago to help encourage people to walk and maintain healthy activity levels, and that app was rated No. 5 in the Top 100 Green Apps by Eco-Libris.

Kaiser Permanente is known for its leadership in the use of health information technology. The Kaiser Permanente electronic health record is the largest non-governmental medical record system in the world. KP HealthConnect enables all of Kaiser Permanente’s nearly 16,000 physicians to electronically access the medical records of all 8.9 million Kaiser Permanente members nationwide and serves as a model for other care systems.

Kaiser Permanente has received numerous awards for its health IT expertise, including four 2011 eHealthcare Leadership Awards.

You can learn more about how patients, clinicians and researchers are using My Health Manager and KP HealthConnect by checking out Kaiser Permanente’s YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/kaiserpermanenteorg. Kaiser Permanente also has what might be the world’s most complete electronic medical library to support its caregivers by providing convenient access to the best and most current medical science. That electronic medical library is for internal use only.

Nearly 9 Million Kaiser Permanente Health Records Securely Available on Mobile Devices

Kaiser Sunset Hospital in Los Angeles, CA
Kaiser Sunset Hospital in Los Angeles, CA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


10 Hot iPhone Apps for New Parents

Image

Parenting in the internet age certainly still has its challenges, but tech-savvy parents have several options in the App Store that can help ease some of the stress. Storing important information, accessing records and even entertaining your newborn can all be done with a tap of the screen; here are ten iPhone apps that all new parents should check out.

1. Baby Tracker: Diapers – If your pediatrician asks you to keep a record of Baby’s diapers, the Baby Tracker: Diapers app is a must-have. The simple interface includes a color swatch and texture options, and even has a Notes feature for in-depth documentation.
2. White Noise Lite – Many parents swear by sound machines to soothe babies and help them sleep soundly; the White Noise Lite app offers several options, including nature sounds and traditional white noise. The best part? It’s free.
3. Baby Tracker: Nursing – The folks at Baby Tracker hit another home run with their Nursing app. Mothers who choose to breastfeed can keep track of nursing times, duration and left/right nursing sides. As an extra bonus, there’s also an option for tracking bottle feedings as well.
4. Baby Brain – Created by a team of experienced OB/GYN nurses and moms, the nap-tracking app Baby Brain helps new parents calculate ideal nap times. Entering the time and duration of baby’s daily naps help the app to analyze the information and provide estimates for when subsequent naps should occur. Parents with multiples can track more than one baby, and the interface allows for easy schedule-sharing via email with caregivers.  This one is TOUGH to find but we love it!
5. Parenting Ages & Stages – Popular magazine PARENTING offers a free app to track developmental milestones from birth to school-age, keeping it relevant for years to come. The high-tech version of the baby book.
6. FeverMeds – Unfortunately, low-grade fevers are part of any new parent’s life. The FeverMeds app calculates age and weight to return the ideal dosage of medication to combat those fevers, and also displays pictures of over-the-counter medication boxes in order to eliminate the possibility of choosing the wrong product. It also tracks dosage time and counts down to the next scheduled dose.  Another tough one to find… Sorry, but it’s great!
7. What to Expect – Baby – Generations of moms-to-be have relied upon the wisdom of What to Expect When You’re Expecting. The beloved line of books also extends into early parenting and development. The What to Expect – Baby app makes carrying the book everywhere a snap, and also includes daily updates and trackers.
8. BabyPhone Deluxe – Instead of packing a baby monitor for trips or carting it from room to room, consider the BabyPhone app. If noise levels in the room exceed a designated level, the app automatically dials a secondary number to alert parents.
9. Infant Visual Stimulation – With one hundred and twenty black and white images designed to stimulate babies vision, the Infant Visual Stimulation app is a great resource for new parents.
10. Baby Rattle 123 – Leaving Baby’s favorite rattle at home is no longer cause for concern with the Baby Rattle 123 app, which transforms your phone into a visually and auditory stimulation tool.

All new parents need some help, so it is a great idea for the iPhone to serve multiple purposes. Check out the App Store for these and other great apps for new parents. You never knew a phone could do so much.

THANK YOU NANNY NET  – Debbie Denard

BEST NEW PARENTING BLOG: NANNY NET –   http://www.nanny.net/blog/10-iphone-apps-for-new-parents

 

RELATED LINKS:

HOW A BABY TAKES SHAPE INSIDE YOUR BODY:  http://www.babycentre.co.uk/video/pregnancy/baby-takes-shape/

WONDERFUL PBS DOCUMENTARY recommended by author, Michael Gonzalez Wallace:  http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/the-secret-life-of-the-brain/

Monitor Babies from iPhone, iPad or IPod

Love this gadget.  BabyPing recently announced the arrival of its new high security Wi-Fi baby monitoring system. The product will allow parents to hear and view their baby utilizing an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch. The system also features double-layer security that alerts parents if their baby cries, if the Wi-Fi connection drops out or if their iOS device is out of range.

 

The BabyPing kit features all the specifications of a regular baby monitor, in the form of a full color video camera with 640×480 resolution and built-in microphone, a free monitoring app for the user’s iDevice, and wireless Wi-Fi connectivity. In addition, BabyPing has developed the Smart Filter which reduces background noise and static, and Constant-Connect technology which instantly notifies the user when the baby is upset or if the connection is lost. BabyPing is also reportedly the only Wi-Fi baby monitor on the market with infrared night vision.

BabyPing will be available from February 2012.

WebMD Baby, a new free Apple iPhone app

A Free Source of Information and Advice for New Parents

By 
Published: January 25, 2012

Everyone wants a piece of a new parent — or, at least, the wallet of a new parent.

Baby Connect, an app for iPhone and Android, showing a graph of a baby’s daily activities.

Browse all the mobile app coverage that has appeared in The New York Times by category, and see what Times writers have on their phones and tablets.

WebMD Baby, a new iPhone app, has about 400 articles, 600 tips and 70 videos

App stores are part of that money rush. There’s mobile software that can help parents name their babies, soothe their babies, entertain their babies and speak to their babies in sign language.

The newest baby app of note on the market, though, WebMD Baby, is free, and it is arguably more practical and useful than many of the others combined.

WebMD Baby is available only on Apple devices, at least until the company releases an Android version later this year. It provides a strong complement to — if not a total replacement for — Baby Connect ($5 on Android andApple), the best mobile assistant for new parents.

Unlike Baby Connect, whose strengths and weaknesses I’ll detail in a moment, WebMD Baby comes packed with information. The app takes advantage of its parent company’s trove of medically related content to offer parents guidance on what to expect from their child’s physical and emotional development, as well as health-related counsel when things go wrong.

At the app’s core are roughly 400 articles, 600 tips and 70 videos.

For parents of a 1-year-old, for instance, the app recently offered a video question and answer with a pediatrician about top mistakes parents make with toddlers. (Hint: to properly calibrate discipline, issue one-minute “time outs” for 1-year-olds, two minutes for 2-year-olds, and so on.)

Oddly, the app doesn’t allow for full-screen video in landscape mode, but since this is a new app, I’d expect WebMD to fix this flaw quickly.

The app also presents daily and weekly packages of information aimed at helping parents understand a child’s development during the first year. Last week, the daily tip for a parent with a 3-week-old baby, for instance, offered details about what to expect at a one-month doctor’s visit. (There are packages for the child’s second year, as well, but at longer intervals.)

Some have criticized WebMD for publishing medical advice that might encourage readers to use its advertisers’ products, but I found the section on “Illnesses and Emergencies” to be generally free of specious advice. For now, at least, there is no advertising on the app.

WebMD Baby also has a “Baby Book” section, where you can record and store videos, pictures and notes of a child’s milestone moments. The videos and photos also remain in the device’s photography storage area, so they’re not held hostage by the app.

Thankfully, every page is designed in a way that would make it easy for a parent to use with one hand — while, presumably, holding a sleeping baby with the other.

One of the app’s shortcomings is that parents can’t peek in on the app from different devices and see the latest information. If you log information into WebMD Baby from aniPhone and then your spouse logs onto the app from an iPod Touch, for instance, it won’t show her the information you entered in the iPhone.

With Baby Connect, however, such an arrangement would work nicely. Even if you have an Android phone and your spouse has an iPhone, any time you enter new information into the app, those changes will appear on your spouse’s app the next time it’s opened.

Baby Connect lacks the information and advice that makes WebMD Baby so valuable, but it has more tracking options than its competitor. The app prompts you to create a separate page for each child. From there, parents and caregivers can track mood and activities, as well as health-related items like vaccines, temperature and medicines.

If you’d like to simply remember where you were at a given moment with the baby — so you can remember their first public tantrum, perhaps — the “My Location” button will make a record of it.

The app is generally easy to use, and it includes a helpful summary page for each child so you can scan recent entries at a glance.

That said, it can be difficult at times to understand the app’s internal logic. Seven main features are included on a child’s home page, including “Medical.” (Additional features are expected in an updated version the company plans to release this week.) When pressed, the Medical button yields a list of items like weight, or vaccines.

Alongside those main buttons on the child’s home page is one titled “More,” which leads to another screen of items like nursing, solid food and, again, vaccines. Unlike the vaccine section found through the child’s home page, though, this one includes a list of common inoculations.

If you choose one from the list, thereby indicating that your children received that particular vaccine, the app will record the event in the other “Vaccine” location. That’s helpful, but it would be much simpler to offer the list of vaccines in the original “Medical” section.

New parents have enough to figure out. They don’t need to add tricky software to the list.

Yet Baby Connect remains a more fully featured app for new parents than WebMD Baby. For people who are approaching parenthood for the first time, and who have a tendency toward extreme organization, Baby Connect is a good complement to WebMD Baby.

Otherwise, I’d leave space for WebMD Baby and feel grateful for a moment’s respite from spending money on parenting products.

Quick Calls

Fans of the comic strip Pearls Before Swine should check out Only the Pearls ($4 foriPad), which includes 250 strips, 12 animated strips and video interviews with the author. … Want a ballpark estimate of your tax refund? Consider TaxCaster by TurboTax (free onAndroid and Apple). … Asteroids Gunner (free on Apple) is a well-executed reprise of the classic Atari arcade game.

A version of this article appeared in print on January 26, 2012, on pageB6 of the New York edition with the headline: A Free Source of Information and Advice for New Parents.

Can an iPhone or iPad Help with Anorexia Nervosa Intervention

Image representing iPhone as depicted in Crunc...
Image via CrunchBase

It’s called “Photo-Therapy” and it may offer a promising intervention

 By Sidney H. Weissman, MD | January 11, 2012
Dr Weissman is on the Faculty at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis and he is Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University in Chicago.
  ________________________________________________________________________________

We now communicate in ways that are very different from those available just a decade ago. The iPhone, iPad, and similar devices also enable us to observe ourselves as we perform any number of activities. These and other new devices may have an application their designers never considered. I believe we can harness this technology to help us treat some of our patients.

Specifically, I propose that the ability of the iPhone and iPad to ”film” ourselves in real time could serve as an important therapeutic instrument in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN).

  • We know patients with AN have a delusional sense that they are overweight and have a distorted body self-perception, even when they are undernourished and near death. To address the distorted self-image, we use various medications and forms of individual, group, and family psychotherapy along with nutritional support administered with the help of dieticians.

These treatments aim to correct the patient’s delusional perception of body image and to establish life sustaining eating patterns that will maintain body weight. Correcting the patient’s delusional self-perception is seen as critical in the patient developing life-sustaining eating patterns. Over time, and for some patients, however, these treatment approaches have limited success.

Mental health professionals typically employ verbal or written communications to address and alter an anorexic patient’s distorted self image. Patients may appear to accept our therapeutic pleadings and go along with varied elements of our treatments. Secretly, however, they often don’t believe what they tell us. Thus, even when we believe our treatment has been successful, seeds of relapse often exist.

If we focus on obtaining a better understanding of how patients with AN distort their body image, perhaps we can enhance our therapeutic approaches?

If a patient with AN sees her reflection in a mirror, she typically perceives herself as overweight. However, if she is shown an iPhone image of herself immediately after it is taken, I have found that she may see herself differently — in fact, as the undernourished person she really is.

When she sees herself in the mirror, the image she sees is instantaniously fused and distorted with her self-perception as overweight. When the same individual holds an iPhone with an image of herself immediately after it is taken, a different cognitive process is involved. First she observes in the iPhone a picture of a woman and that woman’s physical characteristics. She may be able to accurately describe the physicality of the woman in the picture as extremely thin. This may occur because thebrain first registers the physicality of the person. Quickly the patient will realize that she is, in fact, the woman in the iPhone image. At this point, she may or may not continue to be able to report accurately what she now knows is her own picture.

The therapist who treats patients with AN can use the patient’s potential capacity to correctly describe the iPhone images to help her correct distortions of body image.  Let me describe an approach utilizing this knowledge that has successfully worked with some of my patients with AN.

First the patient is asked to observe and then describe her image as seen in a mirror with her therapist present. Then an iPhone image is taken. She is asked by her therapist to describe the iPhone image. If she can correctly describe her physicality in the iPhone image and distinguish it from her distorted view of the mirror image, her therapist can go on to address with the patient her distorted body image.

When a patient persistently describes the woman in the iPhone image in the same terms as she does when observing herself in the mirror, the therapist takes a picture with the patient. The therapist then asks the patient to describe separately their images. If she sees a distorted image of the therapist, the therapist and patient then work to develop a jointly shared description of the therapist. Once this is achieved, both re-examine the image of the other person in the phone image. . .  the patient. They now work together to develop a jointly shared view of the patient.

The therapist does not correct the patient’s misinterpretation of the phone image. If she has correctly described the image of the the therapist but cannot accurately describe her own image, then the therapist may remind her that both agreed on the therapist’s image. At this point, they may again see if they can come to an agreement on a description of the woman in the image. If they now can not, the therapist can explore with the patient why she felt she could not.

The psychotherapeutic  techniques used in this process are described by Frieda Fromm-Reichmann in Principles of Intensive Psychotherapy.1  “The psychiatrist should not argue . . . He should  state quite simply that he does not share the patient’s . . . interpretation or evaluation of facts . . . He should try to interest the patient in the investigation of the following questions. . . why is there a difference in the patient’s interpretation or. . . perception from those of the psychiatrist.”

By reconciling the patient’s perception of herself in the phone image and in the mirror, the patient may actually be able to correct her errors of body image and would — with additional therapeutic interventions to sustain this corrected vision and — eventually be able to maintain her weight with little or no outside help.

The additional treatment would also utilize appropriate  principles and techniques of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy as well as nutritional counseling.

Because of the risk that body image distortion and weight loss will recur, the patient may benefit from learning how to use the selective phone images throughout her life to ensure a reliable body image, regardless of whether she is in therapy.

Conclusion
These therapeutic interactions may be a useful facet of a multifaceted therapeutic approach. They are intended to reduce the power of body distortion in perpetuating AN. CBT and nutritional counseling continue as important elements in the treatment of AN. The technique to address distortion of body image may also be of use in the treatment of patients with body dysmorphic disorder.

Reference
1. Fromm-Reichman F. Principles of Intensive Psychotherapy.  University of Chicago Press, Chicago;1950:175.

The First Comprehensive Biological Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa in Fifty Years Revealed in New Book

One of America’s leading experts in eating disorders and integrative medicine presents a revolutionary new treatment plan for women and men with anorexia

Quote startAnorexia is not the disease we’ve always thought it was. It’s not just a psychiatric disorder. Anorexia is a medical illness of starvation that causes malnutrition in the body and the brain. Treatment needs to focus on correcting this malnutrition.Quote end

The first thing Dr. James M. Greenblatt wants you to know about anorexia nervosa in Answers to Anorexia (Sunrise River Press, softbound, $16.95), his breakthrough new treatment for treating and preventing the disease, is that this is no trivial condition.

“Anorexia nervosa is not just an eating disorder. It’s the most lethal psychiatric disorder on the planet. One of out of every five patients dies within twenty years of diagnosis, predominantly from suicide.”

The second thing Greenblatt, a noted expert in eating disorders and integrative medicine, wants perfectly clear is that the medical profession has failed the millions of young women—and increasingly men—ravaged by the spiral of self-imposed starvation that anorexia unleashes.

“Anorexia is not the disease we’ve always thought it was. It’s not just a psychiatric disorder. Anorexia is a medical illness of starvation that causes malnutrition in the body and the brain. Treatment needs to focus on correcting this malnutrition.”

By treating the underlying medical illness of brain starvation, Greenblatt has had success in helping anorexic patients recover. Armed with the latest research from the frontiers of brain chemistry and nutrition, he even believes that anorexia nervosa may be preventable. That’s the best news we’ve had in fifty years of treating the disease.

Greenblatt’s new nutritional paradigm resulted in his developing a highly accessible treatment regimen incorporating holistic and integrative/nutritional medicine. The nutritional model also enabled Greenblatt to develop a new diagnostic tool for determining the likely effectiveness of individual medications for the treatment of depression and anxiety that often accompany anorexia.

Many of the symptoms anorexics present, including ironically, self-starvation, are themselves expressions of a starving brain. A brain that convinces you it’s a good idea to starve is an insidious adversary. Fortunately, as Greenblatt’s research concludes, you can stop this life- threatening process with targeted nutritional interventions.

“There will always be a role for therapy and medications in the treatment of anorexia,” Greenblatt explains. “But for the first time there’s a treatment that stops the downward spiral of this disease long enough to provide effective treatment and facilitate sustained recovery.”

That will be world-changing news to the millions of families faced with the daily nightmare of “reasoning” with someone intent on starving herself. Greenblatt’s brain research has also led to the aforementioned diagnostic test—referenced electroencephalogram (rEEG)—that has been proven successful in helping doctors know which medications will work for individual patients. “It beats the trial and error method of polypharmacy hands down,” Greenblatt explains. “That’s important. The faster you can treat the symptoms of anorexia—the depression, the obsessive thoughts—the profound malnutrition—the better the chance of survival. Greenblatt has redefined our understanding of Anorexia Nervosa with his description of this life-threatening cycle that he refers to as “Malorexia.”

Answers to Anorexia presents these neurophysiological breakthroughs in language accessible to any layman. It’s a fascinating book for anyone interested in the physical damage and brain dysfunction that result from anorectic malnutrition. And a life-saver for anyone suffering through it.

For more information, visit http://www.jamesgreenblattmd.com

Media contact: Victor Gulotta, Gulotta Communications, Inc.
617-630-9286, victor(at)booktours(dot)com
http://www.booktours.com

Answers to Anorexia: A Breakthrough Nutritional Treatment That Is Saving Lives
By James M. Greenblatt, MD
Sunrise River Press
ISBN: 978-1-934716-07-6; softbound, 6 x 9, 224 pp., $16.95

Biographical Information

A pioneer in the field of integrative medicine, James M. Greenblatt, MD, has treated patients with complex eating disorders since 1988. An acknowledged eating disorder and integrative medicine expert, Dr. Greenblatt has lectured throughout the United States on the scientific evidence for nutritional interventions in psychiatry and eating disorders.

In addition to being the Chief Medical Officer of Walden Behavioral Care, Dr. Greenblatt is the Founder and Medical Director of Comprehensive Psychiatric Resources, a private integrative psychiatric practice. Dr. Greenblatt also serves as an Assistant Clinical Professor at Tufts Medical School. After receiving his medical degree and completing his psychiatry residency at George Washington University, Dr. Greenblatt went on to complete a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medical School.