Rheumatoid Arthritis Aches & Pains

You don’t want to go wakeboarding or run a marathon anymore.  All you want to do is wake up and be able to walk from your bed to the rest room without feeling like you can’t move.

Yet, suddenly you wake up feeling crippled and sore all over. 

Even your fingers hurt.  You think it’s temporary, but the pain gets worse each morning.

 

It lingers throughout the day. You wonder if it’s arthritis or osteoporosis. 

If you ache all over, chances are it’s Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).  Click on diagram to see where it hurts. 

 

EVERYWHERE!  Your feet, ankles, calves, knees, legs, back, neck, hands, arms, shoulders, wrists…all your joints hurts. 

The pain is equally distributed on both sides of your body. You start moving real s-l-o-w.

  

You tell yourself you are too young for this.  RA can hit when you’re 30 or any time later. It can affect men and women. 

But there are 2 1/2 times more women suffering from it.  It’s a long-term disease that leads to inflammation of the joints and surrounding tissues. It can also affect other organs.

 

Turns out, even a 5% weight gain could trigger it in someone who never had it. Inflammation.  Now, they’re saying with obesity on the rise –more & more people will get it. And they say the cause is unknown.  Hmm…

I’m thinking if even a slight weight gain triggers it, that’s a clue.  A certain type of food may be triggering it. 

Try the process of elimination to try to figure that out.   One more thing…I say look at the 4 E’s first whenever your health is off-balance.

 1) Emotions 2) Environment 3) Eating 4) Exercise

 

EMOTIONS:  YOU SOUND LIKE A BROKEN RECORD –  My Dad loves to say that when my Mom nags him about something.  Similarly, when you feel physical pain it can mean negativity repeating itself in your mind.

Eckhart Tolle, the author of “The Power of Now” says anger affects your physical health when you repeatedly think about something that happened in the past or you worry about the future.  

He says those thoughts cause negative emotions, which cause physical pain.  It’s the reason depression hurts or bullying.  Negative words hurt. Literally.  Negative thoughts hurt. Literally. 

Tolle says anger is contagious. No one should be walking around angry. 

 

 

Take the time to release it.  You benefit.  Everyone around you benefits.

Think of a record. If it has scratches, it skips.  If it skips, you don’t keep listening to it.  If you did, it would severely damage the record (physical pain).   The record is your mind.  Change it. 

Meditate on the present moment.  Empty your mind of all thoughts.  It’s hard to do.  Keep trying.  Go to a quiet place.  Close your eyes.  Visualize releasing mental, emotional and physical pain.  Focus on soft music, rain drops or simply your breathing.  My favorite 3 words are:  Let It Go.

ENVIRONMENT – You may not be able to change your environment, which is why eliminating anger is so important.  If you have to stay in an existing negative environment, go to a different room, step outside or go for a walk in nature. Turning off the computer and all electronic equipment helps too.

 

EXERCISE – The best exercise for RA is stretching slowly first thing in the morning, walking, yoga and swimming. 

EATING: Can Some Fats Increase Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis? (from WebMD)

Yes. Studies show that saturated fats may increase inflammation in the body. Foods high in saturated fats, such as animal products like bacon, steak, butter, and cream, may increase inflammatory chemicals in the body called prostaglandins.

Prostaglandins are chemicals that cause inflammation, pain, swelling, and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis.

In addition, some findings confirm that meat contains high amounts of arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid is a fatty acid that’s converted to inflammatory prostaglandins in the body.

Some people with rheumatoid arthritis find that a vegetarian diet helps relieve symptoms of pain and stiffness. Other people with rheumatoid arthritis, however, get no benefit from eating a diet that eliminates meat.

Is Omega-6 Fatty Acid Linked to Inflammation With Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Omega-6 fatty acids are in vegetable oils that contain linoleic acid. This group of vegetable oils includes corn oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, wheat germ oil, and sesame oil.

Studies show that a typical western diet has more omega-6 fatty acids compared to omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acid is a polyunsaturated fat found in cold-water fish.

Consuming excessive amounts of omega-6 fatty acids may promote illnesses such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. It may also promote inflammatory and/or autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Ingesting fewer omega-6 fatty acids and more omega-3 fatty acids, on the other hand, may suppress inflammation and decrease the risk of illness.

Many studies show that lowering the ratio of omega-6 fatty acids to omega-3 fatty acids contained in the diet can reduce the risk of illness.

 _____________________________________________________________________________________

  

Does Menopause Worsen Rheumatoid Arthritis?

For women with rheumatoid arthritis, going through menopause can increase the intensity of rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. The link is likely estrogen loss, but reversing that loss hasn’t proven to help. Learn what can.

The link between rheumatoid arthritis and menopause is a complicated one. Women with rheumatoid arthritis can expect that symptoms of menopause will affect their arthritis pain. However, research has not been able to precisely pinpoint whatever direct links may exist between menopause and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms.

“There’s not a lot of data showing that menopause makes a big difference in RA, and I haven’t seen that clinically,” said Scott Zashin, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and an attending physician at Presbyterian Hospital.

Estrogen and Rheumatoid Arthritis

The possible connection between rheumatoid arthritis and menopause appears to be estrogen, the female reproductive hormone that decreases in menopausal women. Researchers base this suspicion on certain key facts about rheumatoid arthritis:

  • There are 2 1/2 times as many women with rheumatoid arthritis as men, indicating that the disease likely has something to do with female biology.
  • Pregnancy floods the body with estrogen, and pregnancy is known to suppress rheumatoid arthritis symptoms.
  • Three out of four pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis experience less pain and arthritis symptoms by the end of their first trimester. After they give birth, when their estrogen levels return to normal, 9 of 10 women experience recurring rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, and the symptoms are usually more severe than before.
  • Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by a serious loss of bone density, has been linked to both menopause and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoporosis after menopause has been directly linked to reduced levels of estrogen in the body.

What the Research Shows

Research into direct links between menopause and rheumatoid arthritis is mixed:

  • One study found that post-menopausal woman who received estrogen as part of hormone replacement therapy experienced no significant improvement in their rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. The hormone therapy also did not decrease women’s risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.
  • However, rodent research has found some ties between rheumatoid arthritis and estrogen. One study discovered that rodents with rheumatoid arthritis had impaired function of an important estrogen receptor in their bodies. Another study found that estrogen therapy did suppress arthritis and bone loss in rodents.

Symptoms of Menopause and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Despite this conflicting evidence, it is clear that symptoms of menopause might increase rheumatoid arthritis pain, if only because they make a woman feel that much worse, says Zashin.

Interacting symptoms also can create specific health challenges for menopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis. These include:

  • Osteoporosis. Rheumatoid arthritis already leads to worsening bone density loss, with the inflammation around the joints causing the bones to deteriorate. Inactivity due to arthritis pain and long-term use of corticosteroids for arthritis treatment might also lead to loss of bone density in patients with RA. Menopause may hasten this process, creating even more joint pain and increasing the potential for bone fractures.
  • Loss of muscle mass. Menopause can cause a woman to lose some of her muscle mass. Muscles are crucial for supporting joints that are aching and inflamed as a result of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Fatigue. The inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis can create severe fatigue in some people. Feeling tired is also a common symptom of menopause, usually due to a lack of good sleep. Sleeplessness can compound the fatigue caused by rheumatoid arthritis symptoms.

For women who want a treatment that doesn’t involve taking medication, the answer is exercise. Exercise is an excellent therapy that can help you deal with symptoms of menopause as well as rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, particularly since they intersect. Exercise helps battle bone density loss, increase muscle mass, and improve sleep.

As researchers continue to delve into the connections between these two medical conditions, keep in mind that you have the ability to take action and combat these symptoms.

 
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
 

WHAT IS RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (RA)?

Rheumatoid arthritis is a form of arthritis in which the joints become inflamed and very painful. Women tend to get rheumatoid arthritis more than men. The synovial membranes that surrounds the joint becomes inflamed and becomes thicker. These changes make it more difficult to move the joint. It can lead to the formation of tissue that can harden and form a bony ankylosis which is a fusion of the joint that prevents any movement of the

SYMPTOMS

Rheumatoid arthritis is accompanied by pain and swelling of the affected joint and can also create a fever.

HOW TO KNOW YOU HAVE IT                                                                       

Rheumatoid arthritis can be diagnosed by a blood test that reveals a rheumatoid factor (antibodies) in the blood.   X-rays are also used to determine if there is swelling of the effected joints. 

Measures To Control Pain

 Non-pharmacologic Measures

Non-pharmacologic measures to control pain include practitioner-administered treatments such as:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

 Turns out, I’m not the only one that thinks there is a food connection. Look what I found.

CHEF FIGHTS RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS WITH ‘HERO FOODS’

Seamus Mullen, a chef and owner of the New York City-based restaurant Tertulia, was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2007.

He turned to traditional medicine to alleviate his symptoms, which worked quickly.

“I would get a tremendous pain in my joint, whether it was in my shoulder or my wrist or my knee – it would get very swollen, and it would hurt more than you can imagine,” Mullen said.

Mullen was a finalist on the Food Network’s Next Iron Chef, but a RA flare-up made it difficult for him to finish the show.

He began to question whether the food he ate was affecting his symptoms.

“Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, and our immune system directly responds to the food that we eat,” Mullen said. “We are what we eat – literally.”

Foods to feel better

 
So Mullen started experimenting with the foods he loved – and it turned out his favorites made him feel healthier.

That’s how his book, Hero Foods: How Cooking With Delicious Things Can Make Us Feel Better was created.

“I’d rather have vitamin A, E, all these important vitamins coming from greens instead of from a pill and having my liver process it,” Mullen said. ‘So, I’d rather get all the nutrients I need through a balanced diet instead of through a supplement.”

” . . . our immune system directly responds to the food that we eat. We are what we eat – literally.”

– Seamus Mullen, chef and restaurant owner

 Mullen likes to use leafy greens when he is cooking, like kale and parsley.

Mushrooms also make the list of ‘hero foods,’ both fresh and dried, since they contain immune-boosting properties.

“My feeling is that I have an autoimmune disease (and) my immune system is constantly misfiring and causing issues in my joints,” Mullen said. “Everything I can do to bolster my immune system, to strengthen it, and put it in a better position the better.”

He said eggs are ‘hero foods’ because of their high concentration of protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

Anchovies get a bad rap, he added, but if prepared correctly, they are healthy and tasty.

“Anchovies are really important for your joints,” Mullen said. “I’d rather eat anchovies than take a bunch of glucosamine pills in the morning. This, to me, is the natural way to take care of my joints.”

Mullen, whose book is featured on Rachael Ray’s website, said he wasn’t ready to let go of his dreams at the age of 38 – so he’s fighting the RA battle with every step he takes.

He offers recipes on Ray’s site, as well as tips to dealing with RA.

“We will also take a real look into the lives of people who have various kinds of hardships, and have overcome adversity to find inspirations,” Mullen said on the website. “These people will remind us every day that no matter how hard we have it, how much pain we feel, we can go on.”

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/04/27/chef-fights-rheumatoid-arthritis-with-hero-foods/#ixzz1uNaaZqgF

________________________________________________________________________________________

Further Reading:

 Related articles (updates daily — check back for the latest)

 

 

 

New study on Genetic adaptation of fat Omega-3 and Omega-6 metabolism (blogblooms.wordpress.com)

 

 

Pfizer Arthritis Pill Prompts Safety Concerns (aieverywhere.wordpress.com)

Natural Pain Relievers for Arthritis (massageenvy.com)

8 Great Home Modifications for Rheumatoid Arthritis (larkkirkwood.wordpress.com)

A Look Inside Rheumatoid Arthritis (massageenvy.com)

New Organic Medical Food Treats Rheumatoid Arthritis (aieverywhere.wordpress.com)

Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? (theadventuresofarthritisnfibromyalgia.wordpress.com

8 Great Home Modifications for Rheumatoid Arthritis (larkkirkwood.wordpress.com)

 

A Look Inside Rheumatoid Arthritis (massageenvy.com)

New Organic Medical Food Treats Rheumatoid Arthritis (aieverywhere.wordpress.com)

Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? (theadventuresofarthritisnfibromyalgia.wordpress.com)

Deciding on Rheumatoid Arthritis Surgery (everydayhealth.com)

 

More later…looking into claims that breast milk relieves RA.   If you have RA and something has worked for you, let us know.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

  

  

  • A tertulia is a social gathering with literary or artistic overtones, especially in Iberia or Latin America. The word is originally Spanish

 

 

  • Tertulia Restaurant NYC – (646) 559-9909 – 359 6th Ave.  

 

 

Meantime…

5 Foods to Lift Your Mood

Senior editor of Caring.com, Paul Spencer Scott says to try these smart choices when your mood needs a little boost.

The right foods — like the following five — can stabilize blood sugar, eliminate mood swings, and boost neurotransmitters in the brain, all factors that influence your emotions.

1. An omelet — just don’t skip the yolk

Eat it for: The B vitamins and protein. Egg yolks are the vitamin-B-rich part of the egg.

Other examples: Lean beef, wheat germ, fish, poultry

Why they help: A diet rich in B vitamins can help lessen the severity of depression symptoms. B vitamins, especially B-6 and B-12, can help improve neural function — the way the neurotransmitters of the brain send signals, which helps govern mood. There’s also a growing link between vitamin B deficiency and depression. A 2010 study of 3,000 older adults followed over 12 years found that those with lower intake of these vitamins had a higher risk of depression, according to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The protein in eggs (as with lean meats) helps you feel satisfied longer, stabilizing blood sugar. And eggs can be consumed in a variety of ways, from scrambled to used as a French toast batter to boiled and chopped up as a salad topper — so long as you go easy on the accompanying animal products that are high in saturated fats, like bacon or butter.

2. Nuts and seeds

Eat it for: The magnesium

Examples: Pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, cashews, almonds, peanuts. (Green leafy vegetables and whole grains are also high in magnesium.)

Why they help: Magnesium, a mineral found naturally in nuts and seeds, influences production of serotonin, a “feel-good” brain chemical. Magnesium also affects overall energy production.

Bonus: Nuts are also a good source of protein and healthy fats. And as a whole food, they make a healthy alternative to processed snacks, provided you choose unsalted and unsweetened varieties. Salt and sugared coatings don’t add any health benefits and may make you overeat because they set up cravings in the brain for more and more salt or sugar.

3. Cold-water fish

Eat it for: The omega-3 fatty acids

Examples: Wild salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies, tuna (not more than once per week), rainbow trout, mackerel. Fish-oil supplements are a practical alternative for those who don’t eat these cold-water fish at least three times a week, Reardon says.

Why they help: There’s a reason fish is known as “brain food.” Fatty fish such as wild salmon contain the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, which has been shown to increase the membrane quality and nerve function of gray matter in the brain. Twenty percent of the gray matter in the brain is composed of DHA. Some studies have found that DHA consumption especially increases gray matter in the amygdala, the hippocampus, and the cingulate, three areas of the brain associated with mood. People with severe depression have less gray matter in these areas.

Fish is also a great source of lean protein, which stabilizes blood sugar. Eating small amounts of protein with meals can help keep your mood on a more even keel.

4. Ancient grains

Eat it for: The complex carbohydrates

Examples: Quinoa, millet, teff, amaranth, spelt, barley

Why they help: Complex carbohydrates take longer to digest, which means they don’t cause spikes in blood sugar that can create roller-coaster moods. Complex carbs also increase levels of serotonin in the brain.

While any whole grain is good, so-called “ancient grains” are even better, according to Reardon, because they’re less likely to be man-modified and processed. Packaged, processed, and refined foods made with wheat flour and sugar, in contrast, tend to be digested quickly, causing cause blood sugar to spike. When this happens, the body responds with an oversecretion of insulin, which winds up moving too much sugar into cells — and blood sugars plummet. The end result: poorer concentration, fatigue, mood swings, intense cravings, and overeating.

Ancient grains are increasingly available at mainstream grocery stores and big-box stores such as Costco and Sam’s Club. Look where rice products are shelved. Many ancient grains can be cooked like pasta or rice and served in their place as side dishes, in casseroles, or as a base for fish or chicken.

Bonus: Some ancient grains are a whole-grain alternative for those who are allergic to wheat or have gluten intolerance. (Barley, though, contains gluten.)

5. Green tea

Drink it for: The amino acid L-theanine

Examples: Hot green tea, brewed iced green tea — including flavored varieties like jasmine green tea or berry green tea

Why it helps: L-theanine is an amino acid found mainly in tea leaves; it’s been shown by EEG tests to stimulate alpha brain waves. This can improve focus while also having a calming effect on the body.

“Despite the caffeine, the L-theanine in green tea seems to be profoundly relaxing, with effects that last up to eight hours,” Reardon says. L-theanine is easily absorbed and can cross the blood-brain barrier, adding to its effectiveness.

Clinical depression is a serious illness that requires treatment beyond nutrition, changing what you eat can help beat garden-variety blues caused by stress, and will boost low energy, too.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, be sure to visit: http://www.caring.com

This content was originally published by Caring.com: “5 Food to Eat When You’re Depressed” and this excerpt reprinted here with permission.


___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Other non-food things to do

  • Get plenty of sunshine. Natural sunlight is a proven cure for depression.
  • Engage in regularexerciseat least three times per week. Exercise lifts and mood and alters brain chemistry in a positive way.
  • Experience laughter. It’s goodmedicine.
  • Take a quality superfood supplement to get even morenaturalmedicine from the world of plants.

Four more foods for beating depression from Naturalnews.com


Brown Rice:Contains vitamins B1 and B3, andfolic acid. Brown rice is also a low-glycemic food, which means it releases glucose into the bloodstream gradually, preventingsugarlows and mood swings. Brownricealso provides many of the tracemineralswe need to function properly, as well as being a high-fiber food that can keep the digestive system healthy and lowercholesterol. Instant varieties of rice do not offer these benefits. Any time you see “instant” on a food label, avoid it.

Brewer’s Yeast:ContainsvitaminsB1, B2 and B3. Brewer’s yeast should be avoided if you do not tolerate yeast well, but if you do, mix a thimbleful into any smoothie for your daily dose. Thissuperfoodpacks a wide assortment ofvitamins and mineralsin a small package, including 16amino acidsand 14 minerals. Amino acids are vital for the nervous system, which makes brewer’s yeast a no-brainer for treating depression.

Cabbage:Contains vitamin C and folic acid. Cabbage protects against stress, infection and heart disease, as well as many types of cancers, according to the American Association for Cancer Research. There are numerous ways to getcabbageinto your diet; toss it in a salad instead of lettuce, use cabbage in place of lettuce wraps, stir fry it in your favorite Asian dish, make some classic cabbage soup orjuiceit. To avoid gas aftereatingcabbage, add a few fennel, caraway or cuminseedsbefore cooking. Cabbage is also a good source of blood-sugar-stabilizingfiber, and the raw juice of cabbage is a knowncurefor stomach ulcers.

Also worth mentioning:Foods likeraw cacao, dark molasses and brazilnuts(high in selenium) are also excellent for boosting brain function and eliminating depression. Get rawcacaoand brazil nuts atNature’s First Law. Another source for cacao isNavitas Naturals.

Things to avoid

If you feel you are depressed or at risk for depression, you also need to avoid certain foods and substances. Some commonly prescribed drugs — such as antibiotics, barbiturates, amphetamines, pain killers, ulcer drugs, anticonvulsants, beta-blockers, anti-Parkinson’s drugs, birth control pills, highbloodpressure drugs, heart medications and psychotropic drugs — contribute to depression. If you are taking any of these, don’t quit them without talking to yourdoctor; but be aware that they may be contributing to your condition by depleting your body of depression-fighting vitamins and minerals.

You should also avoid caffeine, smoking and foods high infatand sugar. Keeping your blood sugar stable and getting B vitamins is important for stabilizing your mood. Cacao can be good for mood because it releases endorphins inthe brain, but watch out for milk chocolate and candy varieties high in sugar.

###

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/020611.html#ixzz1sJ20Y5CM

Stay healthy! 🙂

6 Nutrients for Your Brain’s Health

The Pie of excellent brain health includes:  Nutrition, Physical Activity, Mental Stimulation, Socialization & Spirituality.  I would add Sleep & Fresh Air.  Click on image to enlarge it.

I explore nutrition because the first study, to use nutrient levels in the blood to analyze the effect of diet on memory and thinking skills, and brain volume says nutritional factors do influence brain health.  It makes sense that we need to feed our mind well as much as our body.  Good input.  Good output.  Feeding your brain well may ward off memory loss, dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease.  The findings appeared in Neurology, a journal from the American Academy of Neurology.

The 6 nutrients linked to good memory and thinking skills are:

  1. omega-3 fatty acids (salmon, tuna, mackerel and trout are particularly high in omega-3s)
  2. vitamins B (meats, fish, eggs, cheese & some cereals)
  3. vitamin C (orange juice, broccoli, red peppers, dark green vegetables, strawberries & kiwi)
  4. vitamin D (natural sunlight)
  5. vitamin E (vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, leafy greens, whole grains, wheat germ)
  6. vitamin B-12 (clams, oysters, mussels, liver, caviar, octopus, salmon, tuna, cod, trout, bluefish, crab, lobster, beef, lamb, cheese, egg yolks, more below)
People with high blood levels of these nutrients:
  • Scored better on thinking tests than those who had low blood levels of these nutrients.
  • Their brains also showed less shrinkage, a sign of brain health.

People with Alzheimer’s typically have smaller brains than those without the disease.  What causes brain shrinkage? Trans fats. That’s the unhealthy type of fat. People with high levels of trans fats scored lower on thinking and memory tests.   Where are unhealthy trans fats found?


So, keep your thinking and memory sharp by sticking with nutritious foods.

The study, part of the Oregon Brain Aging Study, involved 104 people, average age 87. Other than advanced age, they had few risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia.

“These results need to be confirmed, but obviously it is very exciting to think that people could potentially stop their brains from shrinking and keep them sharp by adjusting their diet,” said study author Gene Bowman of Oregon Health and Science University in Portland.

By ALZinfo.org, The Alzheimer’s Information Site. Reviewed by William J. Netzer, Ph.D., Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation at The Rockefeller University.

Sources: Christy C. Tangney, Nikolaos Scarmeas: “The Good, Bad, and Ugly? How Blood Nutrient Concentrations May Reflect Cognitive Performance.” Neurology Vol 78 No 1, 2012.

G. L. Bowman, L.C. Silbert, D. Howieson, et al: “Nutrient Biomarker Patterns, Cognitive Funciton, and MRI Measures of Brain Aging.” Neurology Vol 78, No. 1, 2012.

For More Information please visit Alzheimer’s Research Foundation at http://www.alzinfo.org

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Other Vitamin B12 Rich Foods

Fortified Cereals*
List of Cereals High in Vitamin B12
20μg (333% RDA) per 100 gram serving 16μg (267% RDA) in an average bowl (2 cups) (80 grams) 8μg (133% RDA) per cup (40 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Cereals
Liverwurst Sausage 13.46μg (224% RDA) per 100 gram serving 2.42μg (40% RDA) per slice (18 grams) 3.77μg (63% RDA) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Liverwurst Sausage
Fortified Energy Bars* 12.24μg (204% RDA) per 100 gram serving 5.39μg (90% RDA) per bar (44 grams) 2.7μg (45% RDA) in half a bar (22 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Energy Bars
Fois Gras (Goose Liver Pâté) 9.4μg (157% RDA) per 100 gram serving 1.22μg (20% RDA) per tablespoon (13 grams) 2.63μg (44% RDA) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fois Gras (Goose Liver Pâté)
Emu Steak 9.37μg (156% RDA) per 100 gram serving 36.92μg (615% RDA) per tablespoon (394 grams) 7.96μg (133% RDA) per ounce (85 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Emu Steak
New England Clam Chowder 4.8μg (80% RDA) per 100 gram serving 12.1μg (202% RDA) per cup (252 grams) 1.54μg (26% RDA) in a fluid ounce (32 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for New England Clam Chowder
Manhattan Clam Chowder 3.3μg (55% RDA) per 100 gram serving 7.92μg (132% RDA) per cup (240 grams) 0.99μg (17% RDA) in a fluid ounce (30 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Manhattan Clam Chowder
Luncheon Meat* 5.14μg (86% RDA) per 100 gram serving 1.44μg (24% RDA) per one ounce slice (28 grams) 2.88μg (48% RDA) in two slices (56 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Luncheon Meat
Hard Salami* 2.8μg (47% RDA) per 100 gram serving 3.16μg (53% RDA) in one 4 ounce package (113 grams) 0.28μg (5% RDA) per slice (10 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Hard Salami
Whey Powder 2.37μg (40% RDA) per 100 gram serving 3.44μg (57% RDA) per cup (145 grams) 0.19μg (3% RDA) per tablespoon (8 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry Sweet Whey
Yogurt (No Fat) 0.61μg (10% RDA) per 100 gram serving 1.49μg (25% RDA) per cup (8oz) (245 grams) 0.69μg (12% RDA) per 4oz serving (half-container) (113 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Plain Yogurt (No Fat)
Yogurt (Whole) 0.37μg (6% RDA) per 100 gram serving 0.91μg (15% RDA) per cup (8oz) (245 grams) 0.42μg (7% RDA) per 4oz serving (half-container) (113 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Plain Yogurt (Whole)
Skim Milk 0.53μg (9% RDA) per 100 gram serving 1.3μg (22% RDA) per cup (245 grams) 0.16μg (3% RDA) in a fluid ounce (31 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Non-Fat Milk
Whole Milk 0.44μg (7% RDA) per 100 gram serving 1.07μg (18% RDA) per cup (244 grams) 0.14μg (2% RDA) in a fluid ounce (31 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Full Fat Milk
Low-Fat Buttermilk 0.22μg (4% RDA) per 100 gram serving 0.54μg (9% RDA) per cup (245 grams) 0.07μg (1% RDA) in a fluid ounce (31 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Low-fat Buttermilk
Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite) 0.5μg (8% RDA) per 100 gram serving 1.44μg (48% RDA) per cup (288 grams) 0.03μg (1% RDA) per teaspoon (6 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Yeast Extract Spread
Cured Ham (Lean) 0.65μg (11% RDA) per 100 gram serving 0.91μg (15% RDA) per cup (140 grams) 0.55μg (9% RDA) in a 3 ounce serving (85 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Extra Lean Cured Ham
Chicken (Lean) 0.31μg (5% RDA) per 100 gram serving 0.43μg (7% RDA) per cup chopped (140 grams) 0.21μg (3% RDA) in a half-cup (70 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lean Roasted Chicken
Fortified Soymilk* 1.11μg (19% RDA) per 100 gram serving 2.7μg (45% RDA) per cup (243 grams) 0.3μg (5% RDA) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Soymilk
Fortified Tofu* 2.36μg (39% RDA) per 100 gram serving 1.86μg (31% RDA) per serving (1/4 packet) (79 grams) 0.7μg (11% RDA) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Tofu

*Amount of vitamin B12 may vary greatly between products. Be sure to check nutrition labels for the exact amount of vitamin B12 from each individual product.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I can’t talk about the brain without mentioning some amazing, brainiac friends I adore, who have written books I love.  Check out my friend, Spencer’s book, “The Brain Mechanic”.  Great read!  http://www.amazon.com/The-Brain-Mechanic-Maximize-Emotional/dp/0757315569

To learn more about Spencer Lord, you can visit his website:  http://www.thebrainmechanic.com/

The book is also available on Audio: http://www.learnoutloud.com/Resources/Authors-and-Narrators/Spencer-Lord/21441

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

And my friend, Michael’s book, “Super Body, Super Brain” is another great read!  http://www.amazon.com/Super-Body-Brain-Workout-That/dp/B005CDTVKA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1334456103&sr=8-1

To learn more about Michael Gonzalez Wallace, you can visit his website at: http://www.superbodysuperbrain.com/

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Stay healthy!
Maria Dorfner

maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

SHINE ON: Foods for Healthy, Glowing Skin

Well, I received a lot messages from my last blog saying my face isn’t shiny at all…that it’s GLOWING. 

Ha. Thank you.  Turns out, some health experts agree. 

While Negative Nancys point out how celebs like Gwenyth Paltrow are “too shiny” other experts tell you how to GET shiny skin in the name of good health and wellness.

Healthy skin IS actually moisturized from the inside out, so the expert dermatologists are correct. 

Plus, I prefer to error on the side of GOOD HEALTH  so shine on Gwenyth!   We can always matte with more powder anyway.

Meantime, here’s how to nourish your skin from the inside/out:

Foods that make Skin Beautiful & Shiny

Everyone wants to have a beautiful and shiny skin.  A healthy lifestyle i.e. daily exercise, adequate sleep as well as nutritionally-balanced diet helps to get a beautiful skin and improve overall health.

Consume a healthy and well-balanced diet that rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, whole grains to ensure your skin gets all the nutrients it requires.

Foods that make Skin Beautiful & ShinyMake Skin Beautiful & Shiny by eating below foods:

 

Walnuts

For a healthy skin, the best-known essential fatty acids i.e. omega 3 and omega 6 must be in balance. Walnuts are an excellent source of Omega-3 fatty acids, which help to make skin smoother and younger looking. Walnuts also provide other health benefits, for example put shine in hair, increase vision properties, and help to build strong bones. To enjoy their benefits, you don’t need to consume cupfuls of walnuts. Just consume handful of walnuts or throw some in your pasta, salad, or dessert.

Green Vegetables

Dark green vegetables are great source of nutrients and antioxidants. They contain potassium, vitamin C, vitamin A, β-carotene, iron, vitamin B6, omega-3 fatty acids and folic acid in good amount. Vitamin A helps in the formation of new cells; thus it keeps the skin, eyes and hair beautiful, shiny and bright. The good content of iron contained in these vegetables can recover iron-deficiency anemia, and make the skin shiny and ruddy.

Garlic

Only a small clove of garlic offers so many health benefits. Garlic has natural blood thinner properties so it improves blood circulation. Also, it is a good source of anti-oxidants which destroy free radicals and prevent premature aging. People having oily and acne prone skin can also get benefit from garlic due to anti-septic properties of it. In many ways garlic can be used to battle beauty problems; however regular intake of fresh garlic can help to prevent the topical use of garlic. Consume a clove of minced or chopped garlic every day to get all the beneficial properties.

Green Tea

In the list of skin-friendly beverages, green tea is on top as it is a storehouse of polyphenols. Green tea is one of the best foods for healthy skin as it protects cells and helps to prevent skin cancer and other skin-related disorders. Whether you take it orally or applied on the skin directly, the anti-inflammatory properties of green tea would surely give you glowing skin. Green tea can decrease the risk of damage from ultraviolet light (the burning rays of the sun), and thus decrease the risk of skin cancer. All these properties of green tea are beneficial to skin health overall.

Ginger

Fresh ginger roots contain volatile oils, phenol compounds which are utilized to treat inflammatory conditions, digestive disorders and many other ailments. For beautiful skin, circulation of blood is very important as when circulation is increased, puffiness is decreased and the blood is better capable to provide skin cells with nutrients/take waste away. Ginger increases blood flow, stimulates skin, and will provide a warming effect when utilized to cleanse skin.

Dark Chocolate

Many people have misconceptions that chocolate is responsible for acne but they are not aware about the fact that chocolate is actually helpful to get beautiful skin. Consumption of dark chocolate keeps the skin hydrated for longtime and protects it from sun damage, which is almost contrary to acne belief. Before you include dark chocolate in your diet, remember that the best type of chocolate has at least 60 percent cacao and high flavanol content.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are the richest source of lycopene, the anti-aging antioxidant. Lycopene present in tomatoes is more easily absorbed by body when it is taken in cooked or processed form. So, ensure to take tomato juice, canned tomato sauce, and ketchup. Besides being an excellent source of the antioxidant lycopene, tomatoes are also regarded as a high-carotenoid fruit. One study has found that lycopene-rich tomato paste helps to prevent sunburn when it is combined with olive oil and applied on skin daily for ten weeks.

Avocados

Avocado is a high-fat fruit which contains vitamins A, D, and E in good amount. Also, it is an excellent source of biotin, vitamin H. Due to all these nutrients, avocado offers a natural way to keep skin moisturized. Also, it helps to soften the skin and prevent brittle hair and nails. It also works well topically. Peel the fruit and mash an avocado; apply the mashed flesh on your skin. Let it on skin for 15 minutes and then rinse it off with a cool washcloth. If you are prone to acne, don’t use it on your skin too frequently.

Nutritionist, Lisa Drayer, MA, says the Top 10 Foods for gorgeous skin and hair are:

1.   Blueberries

2.  Wild Salmon

3.  Spinach

4.  Oysters

5.  Tomatoes

6.  Walnuts

7.   Kiwis

8.  Dark Chocolate

9.  Yogurt

10.  Sweet Potatoes

Fortunately, those are all favorites of mine and you can add my favorite snack to the list as a bonus.  Almonds are a super food for super skin.  Love it.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Overview of Skin from The Cleveland Clinic:

Basics

Skin is the largest organ on our body, made up of several different components, including water, protein, lipids and different minerals and chemicals. It takes a lot to protect you, too: just about six pounds (that’s roughly how much your skin would weigh by itself). Throughout your life your skin will change, for better or worse. In fact, your skin will regenerate itself approximately every 27 days. Proper care and treatment is essential to maintaining the health and vitality of this crucial protection.

What your skin demands daily

It’s easy to skip that glass of water during the haste of your daily routines or to cleanse yourself. But over time, those bad habits can take a toll on your skin. Each day you should make certain to provide your skin with

  • Plenty of water.
  • Thorough cleansing – You should perform this twice daily. At night, make sure you remove all your make-up and cleanse properly before going to bed.
  • Balanced nutrition.
  • Toning – that is, after you cleanse with your bar soap or other cleanser, make sure you use a formulated toner or astringent to remove fine traces of oil, dirt, and make-up that you may have missed when cleansing.
  • Moisturizing – this is a necessary step even for those who have oily skin. There are plenty of moisturizers on the market that are oil-free.

Over the course of your life, you should pay attention to all parts of your skin. Familiarize yourself with it, so you’ll notice any changes that might occur, such as different moles or patches that might require further attention.

This information serves as an overview only, and should not replace a professional’s advice.

Skin’s structure

Epidermis: The outer layer

It’s the thinnest layer, but it’s responsible for protecting you from the harsh environment, with five layers of its own: stratum germinativum, stratum spinosum, stratum granulosum, stratum lucidum, and stratum corneum. The epidermis also hosts different types of cells: keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. Keratinocytes produce the protein known as keratin, the main component of the epidermis. Melanocytes produce your skin pigment, known as melanin. Langerhans cells prevent things from getting into your skin!

Dermis: The middle layer

This is the layer responsible for wrinkles. The dermis is a complex combination of blood vessels, hair follicles, and sebaceous (oil) glands. Here, you’ll find collagen and elastin, two proteins necessary for skin health because they offer support and elasticity. Fibroblasts are the cells you’ll find in this layer, because they synthesize collagen and elastin. This layer also contains pain and touch receptors.

Hypodermis: The fatty layer

Reduction of tissue in this layer is what contributes to sagging skin. This layer is also known as the subcutis. It hosts sweat glands, and fat and collagen cells, and is responsible for conserving your body’s heat and protecting your vital inner organs.

The skin’s proteins

 

Collagen:

It’s the most abundant protein in the skin, making up 75 percent of your skin. This is also your fountain of youth, for it’s responsible for warding off wrinkles and fine lines. Over time, environmental factors and aging diminish your body’s ability to produce collagen.

Elastin:

Think elastic. This protein is found with collagen in the dermis.

It’s another protein, responsible for giving structure to your skin and organs. As with collagen, elastin is affected by time and the elements. Diminished levels of this protein cause your skin to wrinkle and sag.

Keratin:

This dominant protein in your skin makes up hair, nails and the surface layer of the skin. Keratin is what forms the rigidity of your skin.

Can’t find the health information you’re looking for?

This information is provided by the Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or health care provider. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________

More Skin care Tips from THE MAYO CLINIC:

Good skin care — including sun protection and gentle cleansing — can keep your skin healthy and glowing for years to come.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Don’t have time for intensive skin care? Pamper yourself with the basics. Good skin care and healthy lifestyle choices can help delay the natural aging process and prevent various skin problems. Get started with these five no-nonsense tips.

1. Protect yourself from the sun

One of the most important ways to take care of your skin is to protect it from the sun. A lifetime of sun exposure can cause wrinkles, age spots and other skin problems — as well as increase the risk of skin cancer.

For the most complete sun protection:

  • Use sunscreen. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. When you’re outdoors, reapply sunscreen every two hours — or more often if you’re swimming or perspiring.
  • Seek shade. Avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun’s rays are strongest.
  • Wear protective clothing. Cover your skin with tightly woven long-sleeved shirts, long pants and wide-brimmed hats. Also consider laundry additives, which give clothing an additional layer of ultraviolet protection for a certain number of washings, or special sun-protective clothing — which is specifically designed to block ultraviolet rays.

2. Don’t smoke

Smoking makes your skin look older and contributes to wrinkles. Smoking narrows the tiny blood vessels in the outermost layers of skin, which decreases blood flow. This depletes the skin of oxygen and nutrients that are important to skin health. Smoking also damages collagen and elastin — the fibers that give your skin its strength and elasticity. In addition, the repetitive facial expressions you make when smoking — such as pursing your lips when inhaling and squinting your eyes to keep out smoke — can contribute to wrinkles.

If you smoke, the best way to protect your skin is to quit. Ask your doctor for tips or treatments to help you stop smoking.

3. Treat your skin gently

Daily cleansing and shaving can take a toll on your skin. To keep it gentle:

  • Limit bath time. Hot water and long showers or baths remove oils from your skin. Limit your bath or shower time, and use warm — rather than hot — water.
  • Avoid strong soaps. Strong soaps and detergents can strip oil from your skin. Instead, choose mild cleansers.
  • Shave carefully. To protect and lubricate your skin, apply shaving cream, lotion or gel before shaving. For the closest shave, use a clean, sharp razor. Shave in the direction the hair grows, not against it.
  • Pat dry. After washing or bathing, gently pat or blot your skin dry with a towel so that some moisture remains on your skin.
  • Moisturize dry skin. If your skin is dry, use a moisturizer that fits your skin type. For daily use, consider a moisturizer that contains SPF.

4. Eat a healthy diet

A healthy diet can help you look and feel your best. Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins. The association between diet and acne isn’t clear — but some research suggests that a diet rich in vitamin C and low in unhealthy fats and processed or refined carbohydrates might promote younger looking skin.

5. Manage stress

Uncontrolled stress can make your skin more sensitive and trigger acne breakouts and other skin problems. To encourage healthy skin — and a healthy state of mind — take steps to manage your stress. Set reasonable limits, scale back your to-do list and make time to do the things you enjoy. The results might be more dramatic than you expect.

 

Stay Healthy!
maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

Maria Dorfner has worked in major market broadcasting for almost four decades. In 1993, she began specializing in medical/health news. She founded NewsMD Communications, a multiple-award winning company specializing in health. Her stories have been featured on ABC’s Good Morning America, NBC’s Today Show, CBS This Morning, Fox, CNN, and multiple other stations. She has produced the JAMA  (Journal of the American Medical Association) report airing weekly on networks, In 1989, she helped launch CNBC. She later helped launch MedPage Today, The Cleveland Clinic News Service and more.
Her awards include a Freddie for Excellence in Medical Reporting Award, Medical Reporting Scholarship from the American Medical Association (AMA) and Upjohn Pharmacia, Who’s Who in American Women.
She has also produced several original talk show pilots into major national syndication. She is the author of 3 books including “Healthy Within” nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in non-fiction. She is a national honors English and Political Science graduate ofPace University Dyson School of Arts and Sciences, where she was Miss Pace University and was awarded a writing scholarship from NBC News to Columbia University in New York City.  She is an avid swimmer, nature lover and sometimes stand-up comedian.
Most recently, she created BoldHealth on BoldTV and served as producer and host for a year, prior to the NYC studio closing due to Covid-19. In Spring 2021, her 24-Hour health channel launches. 

 

“Make time daily to eat well, exercise, hydrate, get out in nature and relax.” -Maria Dorfner

Thank you half a million readers! You can follow more medical, health and wellness tips by following Maria on Twitter @Maria_Dorfner or Linked In at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mariadorfner or find me on Facebook

Maria Dorfner
Maria Dorfner

10 HEALTHY FOOD CHOICES

1.  BANANAS – Fiber, potassium keeps blood pressure in check.

  
 
 
 2.  BEANS – Fiber, protein, iron, B vitamins, zinc, magnesium, antioxidants.
  
  3.  BERRIES – Antioxidants, boost brain power.
 
  
 
4.  APPLES – Fiber, protects brain cells from tissue damaging free radicals
 
 
 
5.  OATMEAL – Fiber, omega-3‘s, helps burn belly fat
  
 
6.  SALMON – Improves mood, omega 3’s
 
 
 
 
  7.  SPINACH – Loaded with vitamins C, K, A & folate, great brain food, improves mood
 
  
 
8.  YOGURT – Boost immune system, protein
 
 
 9.  KIWI – Vitamin C, potassium
 
  
 
 
10.  PINEAPPLE –  Vitamin C, good for skin.  No knives?  Pick up easy to peel tangerines.
 
 
Related articles