Breakthrough: Mi-Eye2 Diagnoses Joint Injuries With Tiny Camera

TRICE MEDICAL closes $19.3M in Series C financing for their tiny needle-based camera to analyze joint injuries and expedite orthopedic diagnosis without the need for an MRI.

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Mi-Eye2 is a hand-held imaging scope which received FDA-clearance.  It enables doctors to diagnose a sports-related injury in the office, without an MRI.

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It consists of a hypodermic needle with a small camera tethered to a Microsoft surface tablet that shows high-definition pictures.

 

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Jeffrey O’Donnell, Sr. who is President and CEO of Trice Medical says this latest round of financing is a “significant milestone” and will help expand the company’s U.S. market.

Check out CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez report:

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CBS 2’s DR. MAX GOMEZ: If you’ve ever injured your knee it can be hard to tell exactly what’s causing the pain, so the doctor usually sends you for an expensive MRI and maybe an arthroscopy in the O.R. to take a look inside. But what if you could do a scope in the doctor’s office cheaper and safer.

Lemouchi Soufinae injured his knee in a car accident two years ago. Since then he hasn’t been able to play his beloved soccer, because of the pain in his knee.

“I can’t walk more than three blocks, have to lay down, have trouble sleeping at night, lot of strong pain,” he said.

DR. MAX GOMEZ: Two MRIs later, it still wasn’t completely clear what was causing his knee pain.

Lemouchi, Liz Meris has been having severe knee pain. “I couldn’t kneel or straighten without pain, can’t get out of car, swelling in back of knee, hurts to walk, feels unstable,” she said.

DR. MAX GOMEZ: Worse yet, Liz is claustrophobic in an MRI.

“I hate em, I’m claustrophobic. I’m out, I’m in, I’m out again,” she said.

DR. MAX GOMEZ:  The next is usually a trip into the operation room to look around by sticking a scope in the knee. It’s expensive and requires anesthesia. Why not do that in the office, under a local anesthesia?

Thanks to a tiny scope with a hi-def camera on the tip, doctors can do in the office what once took a trip to the O.R.

“It’s a huge game changer, been trying to do for 10 to 15 years, clarity and resolution are now tremendous,” Dr. James Gladstone, Mt. Sinai Health System said.

DR. MAX GOMEZ:  Using only a local anesthesia, Dr. Gladstone inserts the MI-Eye-2™ into Liz’s knee. She was actually watching the same thing Dr. Gladstone was seeing.

It allows him to check and see what and where there’s damage inside the knee.

“Almost as good as O.R. scope, and in many ways better than MRI because it can give you direct visualization,” Dr. Gladstone said.

DR. MAX GOMEZ:  Better yet, if the damage is minimal it saves the patient a trip to the O.R. for a conventional scope, and here’s the best part; it costs under $500 to do this in the doctor’s office as opposed to the $1,500 or $2,000 for an MRI and thousands more for an O.R. scope.

Almost any joint that you can scope can be done with the MI-Eye™: shoulder, wrist, ankle, elbow.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION on THE INNOVATIVE MI-EYE2 VISIT:

http://www.tricemedical.com

 

Also, check out Dr. Max Gomez’s new book available for preorder on Amazon:

“Cells Are the New Cure”

by Robin Smith, MD + Max Gomez, Ph,D; Foreword by Sanjay Gupta, MD of CNN

https://www.amazon.com/Cells-Are-New-Drugs-Bre…/…/1944648801

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Maria Dorfner, a 33 year veteran of broadcast news is the founder of this blog.

Contact:  maria.dorfner@yahoo.com

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15 Things Your Walk Reveals About Your Health

 

Paula Spencer Scott, Caring.com senior editor discovered there really is something to the way he or she moves.  Cue Aerosmith.
 

 
 
The following are 15 walking styles which reveal a whole lot about your health.  If you find one that describes you or someone you know, click on the link below to find out more information about it.
 

1. Walking at a snail’s pace may reveal: Shorter life expectancy

The average speed was 3 feet per second (about two miles an hour). Those who walked slower than 2 feet per second (1.36 miles per hour) had an increased risk of dying.   Walking speed is a reliable marker for longevity, according to a University of Pittsburgh analysis of nine large studies, reported in a January 2011 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

2.  Walking with not too much arm swing may  reveal: Lower back trouble

If someone is walking without much swing to the arm, it’s a red flag that the spine isn’t being supported as well as it could be, because of some kind of limitation in the back’s mobility. Back pain or a vulnerability to damage can follow.

3.  One foot slaps the ground may reveal: Ruptured disk in back, possible stroke

Sometimes experts don’t have to see you walk — they can hear you coming down the hall. A condition called “foot slap” or “drop foot” is when your foot literally slaps the ground as you walk.   A ruptured disk in the back is a common cause, since it can compress a nerve that travels down the leg.

4.  A confident stride in a woman may reveal: Sexual satisfaction

Your stride and gait don’t always indicate bad things.  Women who have a fluid, energetic stride seem to be more likely to easily and often have vaginal orgasms, researchers said.

5.  A short stride may reveal: Knee or hip degeneration

When the heel hits the ground at the beginning of a stride, the knee should be straight. If it’s not, that can indicate a range-of-motion problem in which something is impairing the ability of the knee joint to move appropriately within the kneecap.

6.  Dropping the pelvis or shoulder to one side may reveal: A back problem

Muscles called the abductors on the outside of the hips work to keep the pelvis level with each step we take. So while we’re lifting one leg and swinging it forward, and standing on the other, the abductors keep the body even — unless those muscles aren’t working properly.

7.  Bow legged stride may reveal: Osteoarthritis

Bowlegs (also called genu varum) happen because the body can’t be supported adequately; the knees literally bow out.

8.  Knock-kneed appearance may reveal: Rheumatoid arthritis

In knock-knee (genu valgum, or valgus knee), the lower legs aren’t straight but bend outward.  Sometimes osteoarthritis can also result in knock-knees, depending which joints are affected.

9.  A shortened stride on turns and when maneuvering around things may reveal: Poor physical condition

Balance is a function of coordination between three systems: vision, the inner ear, and what’s called “proprioception,” which is the joints’ ability to tell you their position. The joints can do this because of receptors in the connective tissue around them. But the quality of the receptors is related to how much motion the joint experiences.

10.  A flat step without much lift may reveal: Flat feet, bunions, neuromas

Flat feet are obvious at a glance: There’s almost no visible arch (hence one of the condition’s names, “fallen arches”). But other conditions can also cause a flat walk.

 

11.  Shuffling feet may reveal: Parkinson’s disease

Shuffling — bending forward and having difficulty lifting feet off the ground — isn’t an inevitable aspect of aging. It’s a distinct gait that may indicate that someone has Parkinson’s disease.  The person’s steps may also be short and hesitant

12.  Walking on tiptoes, both feet may reveal: Cerebral palsy or spinal cord trauma

It’s related to overactive muscle tone, caused by stretch receptors that fire incorrectly in the brain. When the toe-walking happens on both sides, it’s almost always because of damage high in the spinal column or brain, such as cerebral palsy or spinal cord trauma.

13.  Walking on tiptoes, one foot may reveal: Stroke

Doctors assessing toe-walking look for symmetry: Is it happening on both sides or only one? When a person toe-walks only on one side, it’s an indicator of stroke, which usually damages one side of the body.

14. A bouncing gait may reveal: Unusually tight calf muscles

Specialists can see the heel-off, the first part of a normal step, happen a bit too quickly, because of tight calf muscles.

15.  One higher arch and/or a pelvis that dips slightly may reveal: One leg is shorter than the other

Limb (or leg) length discrepancy simply means that one leg is shorter than the other. You can be born with limb discrepancy or get it as the result of knee or hip replacements, if limbs don’t line up perfectly after healing.  Shoe inserts usually can make up for a quarter-inch discrepancy; surgery is sometimes recommended for larger differences.

Read the entire article here: http://www.caring.com/articles/things-walk-reveals-about-health

 

This content was originally published by Caring.com: “15 Things Your Walk Reveals About Your Health” and this excerpt reprinted here with permission.