Getting Vitamins From Food vs. Supplements

The vitamin supplement industry, is targeted to reach $24.69 Billion in 2026.

It’s is rising with good reason. Our food isn’t what it used to be when I was a child, and has been tainted from everything from GMOs to fake ingredients.

https://www.nutritioninsight.com/news/highly-nutritious-meat-substitutes-on-the-market-cannot-be-absorbed-by-the-human-body-study-flags.html

That said, it’s important, more than ever, to select high quality vitamins with ingredients that don’t include sugar, like many of the gummy brands these days.

Yet, in the following article, a nutritionist at the Cleveland Clinic says to avoid B12 supplements.

Vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) plays an essential role in red blood cell formation, cell metabolism, nerve function and the production of DNA, the molecules inside cells that carry genetic information.

The Cleveland Clinic nutritionist recommends only ever getting B12 from food, including Milk, Cereal, Egg Yolks, Plain Yogurt, Salmon, Tuna, Clams, Red Meat, Liver, Kidney.

Link to article: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/vitamin-b12/

Below is the problem with that advice. Let’s start with MILK:

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I hate to sound like Spanky in The Little Rascals saying, “Don’t drink the milk!” “Why?” “It’s spoiled!” but be aware:

Milk and other dairy products are the top source of saturated fat in the American diet, contributing to heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease. Studies have also linked dairy to an increased risk of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers.

Interesting they used to deliver milk right to our homes in bottles. Pre-Amazon days, there was The Milk Man.

Health Concerns About Dairy

https://www.pcrm.org › nutrition-information › health-co…

Cereal

Most packaged breakfast cereals are ultra-processed. EWG recommends limiting consumption of these foods, whether organic or conventional. A diet high in ultra-processed food is linked to an increased risk of depression, obesity, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and cancer. Jan 3, 2022

Cereal offenders: potentially harmful ingredients in ‘healthy …

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https://www.ewg.org › news-insights › news › 2022/01

CEREAL contains harmful ingredients

Cereal offenders: potentially harmful ingredients in ‘healthy’ breakfast…Many breakfast cereals claim to be a healthy way to start the day. Their boxes feature cute, colorful characters…

Health Concerns About DairyAvoid the Dangers of Dairy With a Plant-Based Diet

YOGURT Concerns: Yogurt: Not As Healthy As We Thought?

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Yogurt: Not As Healthy As We Thought?Condé NastDietitians weigh in on a new study.

RED MEAT risks:

Eating too much red meat could be bad for your health. Sizzling steaks and juicy burgers are staples in many people’s diets. But research has shown that regularly eating red meat and processed meat can raise the risk of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke and certain cancers, especially colorectal cancer.Dec 2, 2020

Is Eating Red Meat Bad For You? – Scripps Health

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https://www.scripps.org › News Items

Is Eating Too Much Red Meat Bad for You? Eating too much red meat can raise your health risks. Try moderation.

FISH

It’s also possible to develop mercury poisoning from eating too much seafood, even if the varieties have lower levels of mercury. The FDA states that in small amounts, certain types of fish with lower mercury levels may be okay for adults to eat once or twice per week.

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Mercury Poisoning: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, and More

https://www.healthline.com › health › mercury-poisoning

Understanding Mercury PoisoningHere’s what you need to know about mercury poisoning, including the basics about mercury poisoning from eating f…

LIVER AND KIDNEY

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Potential Risks of Organ Meat

While organ meats are highly nutritious foods, they also contain a lot of cholesterol (especially the liver and heart). High cholesterol levels raise your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Therefore, it’s recommended that organ meats be eaten in moderation.=

Final Thoughts:

Eat nutritious foods, but there’s nothing wrong with taking a daily vitamin or supplementing with B12 or any other vitamin you may be lacking.

I recommend everyone visits a General Practitioner to get blood work done, to determine if you’re deficient in anything, which may be causing unwanted symptoms, such as fatigue.

Then, review what foods contain those nutrients, and if you can benefit from adding a supplement.

Look up the Mediterranean diet, which is most common in Blue Zone areas, which are known for longevity. Here’s a link for Reference:


https://www.bluezones.com/2015/04/the-blue-zones-solution-secrets-of-the-worlds-healthiest-people-9-questions-for-dan-buettner/

Breakfast: Egg whites and veggies in the morning are beneficial.

Lunch: Fill your plate with vegetables in the afternoon (making them in olive oil and garlic make them tasty)

Dinner: Grilled salmon (limit per week), chicken, black beans with a side of veggies are a healthy choice.

Snacks: Great choices are blueberries, cherries, almonds, walnuts or pumpkin seeds.

Beverages: Stay hydrated with water and avoid soda or sweetened beverages. If you need a pick-me-up, look into Functional Beverages without sugar or calories, but a bit of caffeine without the crash feeling you get after drinking coffee. A lot of people like to drink orange juice in the morning and fruit, but be aware there is sugar in that, so if you are diabetic or pre-diabetic (which a lot of people aren’t aware they are) you want to stay away from that as you may experience a crash after your blood sugar drops after consuming it.

Soon, I’ll review the best brands in Vitamin Supplements, since it’s a growing market, and you want to make sure they are high-quality and best-in-class.

I do like brands are making it easier to carry vitamins while traveling, so will take a look at those, as well as the best in personalized vitamins.

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RELATED LINKS:


Here’s a list of the best vitamins to take daily:

https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/best-vitamins-to-take-daily#_noHeaderPrefixedContent

Best foods for your brain or memory loss:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/11-brain-foods

Worst foods for your brain’s health:

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/brain-health-experts-agree-absolute-213000688.html

If you’re looking for supplements that are sugar-free, caffeine free, dairy free, soy free, non-GMO with no preservatives, color, flavors or sweeteners that are all natural Vegan you can check out vitamins from Amare.com (link below):

Vitamins You Need Now To Stay Healthy

Great listen if you want to ensure you will prevent or get a mild case if you get Covid-19.

PODCAST LISTEN HERE: http://podwithmeaja.com/defeating-the-invisible-enemy

 
 
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Takeaways:

Firstly, get consistent sleep. If you have problems falling asleep 1 mg. of melatonin.

Stay hydrated beginning with when you first wake up in the morning.

Tylenol is damaging to your liver. Only take it if a fever reaches 103 degrees.

Make sure you get Vitamins D, C, zinc, magnesium, A and K2

Empower yourself by keeping your immune system strong at all times.

FOODS CONTAINING VITAMINS

 

MAGNESIUM

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VITAMIN D

VITAMIN C

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VITAMIN A

K2

ZINC

2 DROPS OF IODINE

VISUALS OF HEALTHY FOOD:

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Stay Hydrated. Start drinking water first thing in the morning. Avoid soda and soft drinks.

 

Exercise Daily. Stretch. Move even if indoors.

Get at least 10 minutes of natural sunshine a few times a week.

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Set aside daily quiet time. No TV. No noise. Quiet your mind. Meditate. It’s a good time to give gratitude.

Stay healthy! Stay safe!

Blog contact: Maria.Dorfner@yahoo.com

How To Tell If You Have A Vitamin B12 Deficiency

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As many as one in five adults are vitamin B12 deficient. 

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Many people don’t recognize symptoms or understand the risk.

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If left untreated, B12 deficiency can cause damage to nerve cells and serious neurological problems, such as memory loss and dementia.

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Those most at risk include:

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  • People over the age of 60 (2 in 5 adults over 60 are deficient)

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  • Women, especially pregnant women on a vegetarian diet

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  • People with gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn’s and celiac disease

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  • Those with diabetes who are taking metformin

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Vitamin B12 deficiency is a serious medical problem that affects an estimated 48 million Americans.

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If left untreated, this condition can cause irreversible damage to nerve cells and other co-morbidities.

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Most people – even those who are at highest risk like the elderly and those with gastrointestinal problems – aren’t aware of the detrimental effects that a deficiency in vitamin B12 can have on their overall health.

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Here to tell you more is Ralph Green, M.D. Ph. D. and Peter Shaw, M.D. who I had the pleasure to interview here: http://bcove.me/k8m7v1c0

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Ralph Green, M.D. Ph.D., of the UC Davis Health System, is considered one of the top global experts on the topic of vitamin B12 deficiency. Dr. Green discusses in-depth the importance of understanding and managing vitamin B12 deficiency.

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Peter Shaw, M.D., is the Chief Medical Officer of Emisphere discusses specifics about a new oral option to manage B12 deficiency without the need for an injection.
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Now, there is a new oral  option to manage B12 deficiency without the need of an injection.

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Cg’s: 
Ralph Green, M.D., Ph.D., FRCPath, Medical Director and Distinguished Professor in Pathology and Medicine, UC Davis Health System Medical Diagnostics Outreach Laboratory
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Peter Shaw, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, Emisphere joins him to answer questions.
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Did you know?
·       It is estimated that 48 million adults/1 in 5 adults may have B12 deficiency.
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·       As many as 25 million or 43 percent (2 in 5) of people over the age of 60 may have B12 deficiency.
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·       B12 is particularly important for pregnant women and the development of a fetus’ neurological function.
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·       B12 deficiency can occur with a range of conditions in which there is an impaired capacity to absorb vitamin B12, including pernicious anemia, Crohn’s disease, and celiac disease, which are common in women.
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·       B12 deficiency is often overlooked, yet early detection and management is crucial because, if not treated, it can lead to permanent nerve damage and serious neurological problems, such as memory loss and even dementia.
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Dr. Ralph Green is internationally renowned and considered one of the top in his field in the world. In this satellite interview, he will educate viewers about medical B12 deficiency – what it is, who is most at risk, and why physicians should be more frequently checking for this deficiency. Dr. Green will be joined by Dr. Peter Shaw, Chief Medical Officer, Emisphere, who will discuss recent advances in this area and discuss a new treatment option available that can normalize B12 levels without the need for an injection.
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FOR MORE INFORMATION: https://eligenb12.com/patient/
 
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MORE ABOUT DR. RALPH GREEN:
Ralph Green is a clinical pathologist, specializing in diseases of the blood. Immediate past chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of California, Davis, Dr. Green serves as Medical Director of the UC Davis Health System Medical Diagnostics Outreach Laboratory. He is internationally recognized for his research, which focuses on studying how deprivation or metabolic disruption of B-complex vitamins, iron, and other micronutrients affect the blood, cardiovascular system, nervous system, and the aging process. He has studied the role of nutrient deficiencies in dementia, coronary artery disease, and stroke. Dr. Green has served as an adviser to National Institutes of Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control, and the American Heart Association.
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MORE ABOUT DR. PETER SHAW:
Peter Shaw serves as Chief Medical Officer at Emisphere. Dr. Shaw has 25 years’ experience as a practicing physician in the UK. He retired from his Primary Care practice in 2007 with considerable experience in many different specialties including; general and orthopedic surgery, urology, obstetrics and gynecology, general medicine, cardiology, chest medicine, and transplant medicine.
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LINK TO INTERVIEW:  http://bcove.me/k8m7v1c0
headshot  Maria Dorfner is the founder of MedCrunch.